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A Dark Record: Criminal Discourse And The African American Literary Project, 1721-1864, Brian Baaki 2016 Graduate Center, City University of New York

A Dark Record: Criminal Discourse And The African American Literary Project, 1721-1864, Brian Baaki

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

A Dark Record charts the emergence and traces the evolution of a central figure in American culture, the myth of the black criminal. It does so both to explore the ideological effects of print, and to present an alternative history of African American literature. Historians have long maintained that the association of African Americans with crime solidified in our national culture during the post-Reconstruction period, the nadir for African American civil rights, with a corresponding rise in the over-policing of black individuals and communities. For its part, my study looks back from the post-Reconstruction period, and examines the role earlier ...


“Oh, God! To Think Man Ever Comes Too Near His Home!”: Thomas Hood’S Poem “The Lee Shore” As A Source For Moby-Dick, Robert J. O’Hara 2016 Selected Works

“Oh, God! To Think Man Ever Comes Too Near His Home!”: Thomas Hood’S Poem “The Lee Shore” As A Source For Moby-Dick, Robert J. O’Hara

Robert J. O’Hara

Chapter 23 of Moby-Dick, “The Lee Shore,” is constructed around a central simile that likens the enigmatic character Bulkington to a struggling ship that must crowd all sail off shore in order to avoid being wrecked upon the leeward land. Although the comfortable port “would fain give succor,” says the narrator Ishmael, “in that gale, the port, the land, is that ship’s direst jeopardy.” Previous scholars have suggested that Melville’s lee-shore imagery may have been derived from either the whaling narratives of Henry Cheever or the paintings of J.M.W. Turner. I argue that Melville’s source ...


American Undergraduates Undone: Social And Intellectual Dysfunction On Campus, Noelle P. Jones 2016 Washington University in Saint Louis

American Undergraduates Undone: Social And Intellectual Dysfunction On Campus, Noelle P. Jones

Arts & Sciences Electronic Theses and Dissertations

The pivotal, formative years of typical undergraduates, ages 18-22, represent a time when students mold their distinctive identities, social personalities, and intellects more intensively than during any other period of their lives. Developmental theorists Arthur W. Chickering and Linda Reisser call this process “journeying toward individuation—the discovery and refinement of one’s unique way of being—and also toward communion with other individuals and groups, including the larger national and global society” (35). In today’s college climate, students flummox and astound parents, professors, and researchers due to their individual immaturity and disengagement with learning. Although these complaints identify ...


A Daring Voice: Confessional Poetry Of The 1970s From Argentina And The United States, Julia Eva Leverone 2016 Washington University in St. Louis

A Daring Voice: Confessional Poetry Of The 1970s From Argentina And The United States, Julia Eva Leverone

Arts & Sciences Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Daring to confront difficult socio-political realities on the page, Argentine and United States poets writing in the late 1960s and early 1970s strove against systems of silence. Implementing direct and indirect poetics, each set of poets embodied, in differing and overlapping ways, elements of the confessionalist mode, at once relational and witnessing. Their poetry in collections from these particular years reflected the risk in their auto-positioning as subjects within their poems and with complex relationships with their audience, and in their usage of language, sometimes fragmented, protective, or urgent. They committed personal experience to the page, and in conveying their ...


"Both Nourished At My Grandmother's Breast": Eating, Feeding, And The Subverted Female Ideal In Jacobs' Incidents In The Life Of A Slave Girl, Catherine Ventura 2016 Seton Hall University

"Both Nourished At My Grandmother's Breast": Eating, Feeding, And The Subverted Female Ideal In Jacobs' Incidents In The Life Of A Slave Girl, Catherine Ventura

Seton Hall University Dissertations and Theses (ETDs)

This essay analyzes the relationship between Harriet Jacobs’ representations of womanhood in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl and the domestic ideal which promoted a woman’s role as nurturer and nourisher. The main female characters in the text, particularly Mrs. Flint, Aunt Martha, and Linda Brent, highlight the distorted nature of womanhood in the context of slavery and point to the subversion and perversion of the nineteenth-century ideals associated with True Womanhood. Each element of the ideal—piety, purity, submissiveness, and domesticity—is, at first glance, seemingly upheld by these women, but a closer analysis of their ...


Natural Elements Representing The Cycle Of Life And Death Through Whitman’S “Song Of Myself” And “When Lilacs Last In The Dooryard Bloom’D”, Priya Patel 2016 Seton Hall University

Natural Elements Representing The Cycle Of Life And Death Through Whitman’S “Song Of Myself” And “When Lilacs Last In The Dooryard Bloom’D”, Priya Patel

Seton Hall University Dissertations and Theses (ETDs)

In Emerson’s essay “The Poet,” he writes that we have “no genius in America” and that we need to find a poet who can be America’s Shakespeare. He continues to say that “America is a poem in our eyes; its ample geography dazzles the imagination…” Not long after Emerson published “The Poet,” Walt Whitman emerged becoming “The Poet” that Emerson was seeking to find. Whitman soon became the “one who would sing of the new country in a new voice.”

In 1855, Whitman published his first edition of Leaves of Grass and shed light to the wonderful landscapes ...


The Lightbringer: A Novel, Brett L. Butler 2016 Abilene Christian University

The Lightbringer: A Novel, Brett L. Butler

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

The Lightbringer is about a collision of two worlds: the world of a contemporary South Florida town and the magical world of Zariel, bringing with it the universal threat of the Terra. Childhood friends, Breck and Tom, are thrown into the middle of an ancient conflict between the Terra—a collection of alien races that have been transformed by darkness—and the forces of good. After an encounter with a magical pool of golden water, the boys must learn to use their new abilities to protect against the growing Terranox army. In the midst of their struggle, however, a mysterious ...


New Appalachians Of The Twenty-First Century: Reinventing Metanarratives And Master-Images Of Southern Appalachian Literature, Kelsey Alannah Solomon 2016 East Tennessee State University

New Appalachians Of The Twenty-First Century: Reinventing Metanarratives And Master-Images Of Southern Appalachian Literature, Kelsey Alannah Solomon

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

The Appalachian studies tradition ascertains that Appalachian people politically, socially, and academically represent a heterogeneous minority group of our own. In post-capitalistic America, however, the Appalachian region serves as a hotspot for media misrepresentation and tourism that perpetuate through works of fiction, nonfiction, and scholarship both negative and positive stereotypes in the overall American consciousness. Twenty-first-century Appalachian authors, I contend, are reinventing Appalachia from its postmodern rubble through fictionalized reconceptualizations of our region’s history, shifts in our collective consciousness from anthropocentric to ecocentric, and subversions of the heteronormative discourse of our internal colony through explorations of the psychosexual. The ...


Keats And America: Attitudes And Appropriations, Jessica Hall 2016 East Tennessee State Universtiy

Keats And America: Attitudes And Appropriations, Jessica Hall

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

While John Keats never traveled to America and only wrote a handful of admittedly hostile lines about it in his poetry, American writers and readers have consistently regarded Keats as one of the greatest and most influential poets of the past two centuries. His critical reputation in America has been stable since the 1840s, enduring throughout changing tastes and movements, and his biography and work have been utilized in manifold appropriations by American poets and writers. I examine Keats’s attitude toward the United States—which was in conflict with the general feeling regarding the country by his fellow Romantic ...


William Faulkner's Southern Landscape, Rachel V. Ford 2016 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

William Faulkner's Southern Landscape, Rachel V. Ford

English Undergraduate Honors Theses

The American South is a region full of rich and complicated history, undergoing slavery, war, poverty, ecological devastation, and racial violence. One of the most famous and distinctly southern writers of the twentieth century is William Faulkner, whose works challenge the idealistic Lost Cause mentality of white supremacy and highlight major issues within southern society. Faulkner’s writings are set in Mississippi, grounded with a distinct sense of place. The southern landscape provides more than simply a backdrop to the stories, but plays an active role in plot and character development. This thesis examines three of Faulkner’s novels, discussing ...


“Insane For The Destination:” Disrupting The Teleological Impulses Of Sylvia Plath’S Ariel And Adrienne Rich’S Diving Into The Wreck, Noah Christopher Brooksher 2016 College of William and Mary

“Insane For The Destination:” Disrupting The Teleological Impulses Of Sylvia Plath’S Ariel And Adrienne Rich’S Diving Into The Wreck, Noah Christopher Brooksher

College of William & Mary Undergraduate Honors Theses

Despite their complex poetry, the critical scholarship of Sylvia Plath and Adrienne Rich has been dominated by oversimplistic and reductive biographical and feminist readings that fail to engage with the nuanced texts. By contrast, this paper intends to examine these poets through a post-structuralist feminist framework. Not only does such a perspective challenge pre-existing critical assumptions of both poets’ work, but it also draws attention to their key differences: their treatment of selfhood and history. In Ariel, Plath’s rejection of a final, transcendent telos informs a poetics that challenges the romantic humanist view of the uniform subject predicated on ...


Telling The Stories That Can't Be Told: Translating War In Hemingway, Vonnegut, And O'Brien, Emily A. Nye 2016 College of William and Mary

Telling The Stories That Can't Be Told: Translating War In Hemingway, Vonnegut, And O'Brien, Emily A. Nye

College of William & Mary Undergraduate Honors Theses

Telling the Stories that Can't Be Told: Translating War in Hemingway, Vonnegut, and O'Brien poses an examination on the use of innovative literary techniques in three examples of twentieth century war literature: Ernest Hemingway's In Our Time, Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five, and Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried. Among others, this thesis considers the use of modernist and post-modernist techniques, as well as the conscious articulation of literary genesis as a means of achieving authenticity in war literature.


"Out Of The Dark Confinement!" Physical Containment In Mid-Nineteenth-Century American Protest Literature, Allison Lane Tharp 2016 The University of Southern Mississippi

"Out Of The Dark Confinement!" Physical Containment In Mid-Nineteenth-Century American Protest Literature, Allison Lane Tharp

Dissertations

Most scholarship on American protest literature tends to focus on the protest literature of specific, politically marginalized groups, such as black protest, women’s protest, or working class protest. My project redefines how we read nineteenth-century American protest literature by investigating the connections between the protest texts of these three marginalized groups. In particular, I argue that mid-nineteenth-century protest authors incorporate images of physical confinement and entrapment within their texts to expose to privileged readers the physical and ideological containment and control marginalized subjects encounter in their daily lives. Drawing from rhetorical theories of argumentation and audience engagement, and incorporating ...


"In The Land Of Tomorrow": Representations Of The New Woman In The Pre-Suffrage Era, Natalie B. O'Neal 2016 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

"In The Land Of Tomorrow": Representations Of The New Woman In The Pre-Suffrage Era, Natalie B. O'Neal

Dissertations, Theses, and Student Research: Department of English

This digital anthology explores feminism in selected short fiction by women writers from the 1911 run of the popular women’s magazines Woman’s Home Companion, Ladies’ Home Journal, and The Farmer’s Wife. This fiction furthered the women’s rights movement by allowing women to imagine a world similar to their own with a heroine who voiced their desires and enacted change. Rather than the more experimental, inaccessible literature of avant garde high modernist writers consumed by the upper class, popular fiction reached a wider, middle class audience and was more effective at producing a progressive zeitgeist following the ...


“I Don’T. I Don’T! I Don’T Hate It! I Don’T Hate It!” The Function Of Place In William Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom!, Ashley Garver 2016 Lake Forest College

“I Don’T. I Don’T! I Don’T Hate It! I Don’T Hate It!” The Function Of Place In William Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom!, Ashley Garver

Senior Theses

This paper explores the literary concept of place in William Faulkner’s novel Absalom, Absalom! I argue that as an inheritor of Naturalism, Faulkner frames his novel around the deterministic quality of place, suggesting that the South as a geographic and cultural region determines the fate of his characters. Faulkner’s narrative structure, which relies on the acts of storytelling and imaginative re-creation, challenges what is real and what is imagined in our conception of place and forces the reader to participate in a process of making meaning that reveals Faulkner’s theory of a cursed South. The events in ...


Lineages Of The Literary Left: Essays In Honor Of Alan M. Wald, Howard Brick, Robbie Lieberman, Paula Rabinowitz 2016 Kennesaw State University

Lineages Of The Literary Left: Essays In Honor Of Alan M. Wald, Howard Brick, Robbie Lieberman, Paula Rabinowitz

Robbie Lieberman

For nearly half a century, Alan M. Wald’s pathbreaking research has demonstrated that attention to the complex lived experiences of writers on the Left provides a new context for viewing major achievements as well as instructive minor ones in United States fiction, poetry, drama, and criticism. His many publications have illuminated the creative lives of figures such as James T. Farrell, Willard Motley, Muriel Rukeyser, Philip Rahv, Richard Wright, Ann Petry, Kenneth Fearing, and Arthur Miller. He has delved into a consideration of Sidney Hook and pragmatism, brought attention to debates within tendencies associated with Cannonism and Shachtmanism, and ...


Empathy In Its Entirety, Callie Reymann 2016 Wright State University

Empathy In Its Entirety, Callie Reymann

Best Integrated Writing

Reymann critically analyzes three novels through the lens of empathy and then applies her critical analysis and observations to her experiences as a person diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome.


Conflicting Cultural Identity And The Baz Benin In Edwidge Danticat’S Claire Of The Sea Light, Kellianne Rinearson 2016 Wright State University

Conflicting Cultural Identity And The Baz Benin In Edwidge Danticat’S Claire Of The Sea Light, Kellianne Rinearson

Best Integrated Writing

Rinearson explores the connection between the gangs in Edwidge Danticat’s Claire of the Sea Light and mythological figures in Haitian folklore thus adding nuance to the discussion of Caribbean cultural identity.


The Grimké Sisters: Radical Defenders Of Women’S Rights And Abolition, Megan Bailey 2016 Wright State University

The Grimké Sisters: Radical Defenders Of Women’S Rights And Abolition, Megan Bailey

Best Integrated Writing

Bailey examines the intersection of gender and religion in the abolition movement of the American Civil War and argues that the Grimké sisters’ effectiveness in preaching against slavery was undermined by the perception that they were too radical.


Best Integrated Writing 2016 - Complete Edition, 2016 Wright State University

Best Integrated Writing 2016 - Complete Edition

Best Integrated Writing

Best Integrated Writing includes excellent student writing from Integrated Writing courses taught at Wright State University. The journal is published annually by the Wright State University Department of English Language and Literatures.


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