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Explosives Engineering Commons

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Full-Text Articles in Explosives Engineering

Additive Manufacturing Of Liners For Shaped Charges, Jason Ho, Cody Lough, Phillip R. Mulligan, Edward C. Kinzel, Catherine E. Johnson Aug 2018

Additive Manufacturing Of Liners For Shaped Charges, Jason Ho, Cody Lough, Phillip R. Mulligan, Edward C. Kinzel, Catherine E. Johnson

Geosciences and Geological and Petroleum Engineering Faculty Research & Creative Works

A Shaped Charge (SC) is an explosive device used to focus a detonation in a desired direction, and has applications in oil extraction, weaponry and demolition. The focusing relies on a void in the explosive mass, shaped by a metal liner that becomes a super-heated projectile during detonation. Additive Manufacturing (AM) allows greater design freedom and geometric complexity for the liner portion of the SC. Specifically, hierarchical structuring and functional grading can potentially provide greater velocity, directionality, and efficiency. In this work, Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is used to explore different geometries for an SC liner made out of SS ...


An Investigation Of Combined Thermal Weakening And Mechanical Disintegration Of Hard Rock, George Bromley Clark, T. F. Lehnhoff, Vernon Dale Allen, Mahendrakumar Ramkrishna Patel Jan 1973

An Investigation Of Combined Thermal Weakening And Mechanical Disintegration Of Hard Rock, George Bromley Clark, T. F. Lehnhoff, Vernon Dale Allen, Mahendrakumar Ramkrishna Patel

Mining Engineering Faculty Research & Creative Works

"The research under modified Contract No. H0220068 has been devoted to experimental thermal-mechanical fragmentation of Missouri red granite in place, and to supporting theoretical analyses. The results of the previous year's experimental work showed that thermal stresses are several times more effective in fragmenting hard rock when they are created within the rock rather than upon the surface. Also, large blocks {4-foot cubes) are not adequate to simulate the response of in situ rock.

Based upon laboratory tests an experimental round was designed analogous to an explosive blasting round with coiled wire heating elements placed in drill holes. Three ...