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Bilingual, Multilingual, and Multicultural Education Commons

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Full-Text Articles in Bilingual, Multilingual, and Multicultural Education

(Mis)Labeled: The Challenge Of Academic Capital Formation For Hmong American High School Students In An Urban Setting, Anna Chiang, Joshua Fisher, William Collins, Marie Ting Apr 2015

(Mis)Labeled: The Challenge Of Academic Capital Formation For Hmong American High School Students In An Urban Setting, Anna Chiang, Joshua Fisher, William Collins, Marie Ting

Journal of Southeast Asian American Education and Advancement

The Model Minority Myth for Asians as a group disguises the challenges facing Hmong and other underrepresented Southeast Asian groups. Using the theoretical framework of Academic Capital Formation (ACF), this qualitative study examines the implications of the Model Minority Myth by focusing on the experiences and educational challenges of Hmong American high school students in an urban setting in the Midwest. Results from this study alludes to a bimodal pattern of achievement amongst the Asian American Pacific Islander community, emphasizing the importance of increasing visibility for underrepresented Southeast Asians, such as Hmong Americans, with regards to access to higher education.


Strategies For Tutors Developing Long-Term Relationships With English As Second Language Students In Writing Centers, Andrew Yim Apr 2015

Strategies For Tutors Developing Long-Term Relationships With English As Second Language Students In Writing Centers, Andrew Yim

Purdue Writing Lab/Purdue OWL Graduate Student Presentations

This poster is looking at strategies for tutors looking to develop long-term relationships with ESL and ELL students in writing centers. The strategies that are included within this poster are taken from my own experiences and other readings. Furthermore, the poster looks at different writing centers throughout the United States that have programs that encourage these long-term relationships.


To Correct Or Not To Correct: The Ethics Of Addressing Grammar In Writing Center Tutorials, Vicki R. Kennell Apr 2015

To Correct Or Not To Correct: The Ethics Of Addressing Grammar In Writing Center Tutorials, Vicki R. Kennell

Purdue Writing Lab/Purdue OWL Presentations

Although students often ask for grammar help, writing center tutors are conflicted over whether and how much to provide such help because of how they internalize the tutoring mandates found in training manuals, tutoring literature, and writing center policies. This results in disconnects between what happens in tutorials and what tutors and writers think happens, with grammar being prioritized regardless of stated agendas or document needs. Solutions to this problem include educating writers and instructors, as well as educating tutors to address grammar productively when and if it is warranted.


Acculturative And Psychosocial Predictors Of Academic-Related Outcomes Among Cambodian American High School Students, Khanh Dinh, Traci L. Weinstein, Su Yeoung Kim, Ivy K. Ho Jan 2015

Acculturative And Psychosocial Predictors Of Academic-Related Outcomes Among Cambodian American High School Students, Khanh Dinh, Traci L. Weinstein, Su Yeoung Kim, Ivy K. Ho

Journal of Southeast Asian American Education and Advancement

This study examined the acculturative and psychosocial predictors of academic-related outcomes among Cambodian American high school students from an urban school district in the State of Massachusetts. Student participants (N = 163) completed an anonymous survey that assessed demographic characteristics, acculturative experiences, intergenerational conflict, depression, and academic-related outcomes. The main results indicated that acculturative and psychosocial variables were significant predictors of academic-related outcomes. Specifically, Cambodian and Anglo/White cultural orientations and depression played significant roles across the four dimensions of academic-related outcomes, including grade point average, educational aspirations, beliefs in the utility of education, and psychological sense of school membership. This ...


[Special Issue On Hmong Newcomers To Saint Paul Public Schools] The Affective Consequences Of Cultural Capital: Feelings Of Powerlessness, Gratitude, And Faith Among Hmong Refugee Parents, Bic Ngo Jan 2015

[Special Issue On Hmong Newcomers To Saint Paul Public Schools] The Affective Consequences Of Cultural Capital: Feelings Of Powerlessness, Gratitude, And Faith Among Hmong Refugee Parents, Bic Ngo

Journal of Southeast Asian American Education and Advancement

In education research, the analysis of the role of cultural capital has focused primarily on its role in parent involvement. Little attention has been paid to how cultural capital affects the attitudes or feelings of parents about their worth and roles as parents. In this article I examine the impact of the exclusionary characteristic of cultural capital on refugee Hmong parents from Wat Tham Krabok. I highlight themes of uncertainty, powerlessness, gratitude and faith that parents repeatedly raised when speaking about their childrens education. I suggest that paying attention to the affectiveemotionalconsequences of cultural capital is critical for understanding the ...


[Special Issue On Hmong Newcomers To Saint Paul Public Schools] Supporting Hmong Newcomers Academic And Social Transition To Elementary School, Martha Bigelow, Letitia Basford, Esther Smidt Jan 2015

[Special Issue On Hmong Newcomers To Saint Paul Public Schools] Supporting Hmong Newcomers Academic And Social Transition To Elementary School, Martha Bigelow, Letitia Basford, Esther Smidt

Journal of Southeast Asian American Education and Advancement

When elementary aged Hmong children were resettled in St. Paul Public Schools after the closing of the Wat Tham Krabok refugee camp in Thailand, their families largely enrolled them in either a Transitional Language Center or a Language Academy program. This study reports on the perceptions teachers and educational assistants had about how well these programs met the needs of this unique population of newcomers. Findings show that the Transitional Language Centers were better able to ease the adjustment to school for the Hmong newcomers because of the safe, bilingual environment they created.