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Who Really Said What? Mobile Historical Situated Documentary As Liminal Learning Space, Owen Gottlieb 2016 Rochester Institute of Technology

Who Really Said What? Mobile Historical Situated Documentary As Liminal Learning Space, Owen Gottlieb

Articles

This article explores the complexities and affordances of historical representation that arose in the process of designing a mobile augmented reality video game for teaching history. The process suggests opportunities to push the historical documentary form in new ways. Specifically, the article addresses the shifting liminal space between historical fiction narrative, and historical interactive documentary narrative. What happens when primary sources, available for examination are placed inside of a historically inspired narrative, one that hews closely to the events, but creates drama through dialogues between player and historical figure? In this relatively new field of interactive historical situated documentary, how ...


The 12 Covenants Of Pinchas Hurwitz: How An 18th-Century Eastern European Kabbalist Jew Produced One Of The First Hebrew Bestsellers, David B. Ruderman 2016 University of Pennsylvania

The 12 Covenants Of Pinchas Hurwitz: How An 18th-Century Eastern European Kabbalist Jew Produced One Of The First Hebrew Bestsellers, David B. Ruderman

Departmental Papers (History)

The Book of the Covenant (Sefer ha-Brit) was one of the most popular Hebrew books read by modern Jews, as reflected in 40 editions spanning two centuries, including three Yiddish and six Latino translations. Part scientific encyclopedia, part manual of mystical ascent, and part plea to Jews to embrace a universal ethics, the work was widely influential in an era of radical change and internal debate for Jews as well as for others. The amazing popularity of the author, the Eastern European Jew Pinchas Hurwitz (1765-1821), stemmed from his kabbalistic pedigree. He offered his readers an exciting compendium of scientific ...


America Abandoned: German-Jewish Visions Of American Poverty In Serialized Novels By Joseph Roth, Sholem Asch, And Michael Gold, Kerry Wallach 2016 Gettysburg College

America Abandoned: German-Jewish Visions Of American Poverty In Serialized Novels By Joseph Roth, Sholem Asch, And Michael Gold, Kerry Wallach

German Studies Faculty Publications

In 1930, Hungarian- born Jewish author Arthur Holitscher’s book Wiedersehn mit Amerika: Die Verwandlung der U.S.A. (Reunion with America: The Trans-formation of the U.S.A.) was reviewed by one J. Raphael in the German- Jewish Orthodox weekly newspaper, Der Israelit. This reviewer concluded: “Despite its good reputation, America is a strange country. And Holitscher, whose relationship to Judaism is not explicit, but direct, has determined that to be the case for American Jews as well.” The reviewer’s use of the word “strange” (komisch) offers powerful insight into the complex perceptions of America held by many ...


Molded From Clay: The Portrayal Of Jews Through The Golem In Yudel Rosenberg’S The Golem And The Wondrous Deeds Of The Maharal Of Prague And Gustav Meyrink’S Der Golem, Reynolds Nelson Hahamovitch 2016 College of William and Mary

Molded From Clay: The Portrayal Of Jews Through The Golem In Yudel Rosenberg’S The Golem And The Wondrous Deeds Of The Maharal Of Prague And Gustav Meyrink’S Der Golem, Reynolds Nelson Hahamovitch

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis examines and compares Yudel Rosenberg’s The Golem and the Wondrous Deeds of the Maharal (1909) and Gustav Meyrink’s Der Golem (1915). These texts brought monumental changes to the Golem legend and brought the creature for the first time into popular modern literature. This thesis pays particular attention to how Rosenberg and Meyrink bind the Golem legend to the portrayal of the Jew in contemporary Jewish and non-Jewish discourses. I conclude my discussion of these two novels by examining them in light of the Finis Ghetto program, an urban renewal program which almost completely destroyed Prague’s ...


"Review Of The ‘Grammar Of Sacrifice’: A Generativist Study Of The Israelite Sacrificial System In The Priestly Writings With A ‘Grammar’ Of Σ", Dale Launderville OSB 2015 College of Saint Benedict/Saint John's University

"Review Of The ‘Grammar Of Sacrifice’: A Generativist Study Of The Israelite Sacrificial System In The Priestly Writings With A ‘Grammar’ Of Σ", Dale Launderville Osb

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Case Study Two: Jewish Time Jump: New York, Owen Gottlieb 2014 Rochester Institute of Technology

Case Study Two: Jewish Time Jump: New York, Owen Gottlieb

Articles

Gottlieb presents an early case study of his mobile augmented reality game Jewish Time Jump: New York design on the ARIS platform for the iPhone and iPad (iOS). The game is set on-location in Washington Square Park in New York city. Players in 5th-7th grade take on the role of time-traveling reporters, landing on site on the eve of the Uprising of 20,000, the largest women-led strike in U.S. History. Based on their GPS location they receive media from over 100 years in the past, interactive with digital characters as they work to gather a story for the ...


Jewish Folklore As Counterculture, Dan Ben-Amos 2014 University of Pennsylvania

Jewish Folklore As Counterculture, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

A literacy divide runs deep in Jewish society. The scribes, the priests, and the prophets who wrote the Bible referred to the folk on the other side of the divide as ha-'am (the people), and the sages, who taught the books that followed, called them 'olam (the world population). Both terms resonate in subsequent Jewish languages. The Yiddish word 'amkha (all the people), and its analogue in Judeo-Spanish, povlacho, have their roots in the Bible where the concept of the "people" is ubiquitous. It occurs in a variety of forms as kol ha-'am (all the people), 'am ha- ...


Literary Innovation In Yiddish Sea Travel Narratives, Ken Frieden 2013 Syracuse University

Literary Innovation In Yiddish Sea Travel Narratives, Ken Frieden

Ken Frieden

Sea travel was an influential literary genre in Europe in the eighteenth century, and this genre subsequently influenced enlightened and Hasidic Jewish circles. As a result, the genre of sea narratives assumed a significant role in the rise of modern Hebrew and Yiddish literature. This article considers the place of Yiddish sea narratives--adapted from Campe's Reisebeschreibungen and in Hasidic writings--in the early nineteenth century. Both enlightened and Hasidic authors shaped modern Yiddish and Hebrew prose.


Book Review -- A Woman's Voice By Morris Rosenthal, Jeanne Bohannon 2010 Kennesaw State University

Book Review -- A Woman's Voice By Morris Rosenthal, Jeanne Bohannon

Jeanne Law Bohannon

No abstract provided.


Shulchan Arukh, Amy Milligan 2010 Old Dominion University

Shulchan Arukh, Amy Milligan

Women's Studies Faculty Publications

[First Paragraph] The Shulchan Arukh, literally translated as "The Set Table," is a compilation of Jewish legal codes. Written in the sixteenth century, it represents the first codification of Jewish law that is universally accepted by religiously observant Jews. It encompasses laws observed by both Ashkenazic Jews, those with German and eastern European roots, and Sephardic Jews, those with Spanish and Middle Eastern roots. Rabbi Yosef Karo composed the work in an effort to provide an authoritative legal text that would help to guide Jews in properly observing religious obligations. Although he composed the text before subdivisions of Judaism existed ...


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