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Urban Studies and Planning Commons

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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Urban Studies and Planning

How A School Salad Bar Can Be A Learning Experience, Too, Robert Gottlieb, Michelle Mascarenhas Nov 1999

How A School Salad Bar Can Be A Learning Experience, Too, Robert Gottlieb, Michelle Mascarenhas

UEP Faculty & UEPI Staff Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Labor Makes A Stand In Los Angeles, Peter Dreier, Kelly Candaele Oct 1999

Labor Makes A Stand In Los Angeles, Peter Dreier, Kelly Candaele

UEP Faculty & UEPI Staff Scholarship

No abstract provided.


How Do We Bridge The Housing Gap?, Peter Dreier, Jan Breidenbach Sep 1999

How Do We Bridge The Housing Gap?, Peter Dreier, Jan Breidenbach

UEP Faculty & UEPI Staff Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Treat Welfare Recipients Like Workers: Pay Them A Wage, Peter Dreier, Fernando Gapasin Aug 1999

Treat Welfare Recipients Like Workers: Pay Them A Wage, Peter Dreier, Fernando Gapasin

UEP Faculty & UEPI Staff Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Looking To Sinclair For A Happy End To A Tale Of Two L.A.S, Peter Dreier, Robert Gottlieb Jun 1999

Looking To Sinclair For A Happy End To A Tale Of Two L.A.S, Peter Dreier, Robert Gottlieb

UEP Faculty & UEPI Staff Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Low-Wage Workers Miss A Tax Break, Peter Dreier Jan 1999

Low-Wage Workers Miss A Tax Break, Peter Dreier

UEP Faculty & UEPI Staff Scholarship

No abstract provided.


What Does Smart Growth Mean For Housing?, Karen A. Danielsen, Robert E. Lang, William Fulton Jan 1999

What Does Smart Growth Mean For Housing?, Karen A. Danielsen, Robert E. Lang, William Fulton

Public Policy and Leadership Faculty Publications

Barely noticed amid the returns from the 1998 midterm elections was a quiet revolution that goes to the heart of how and where Americans live. While most news accounts focused on the high-profile candidate elections, voters across the nation-in Democratic and Republican areas alike-approved more than 160 state and local ballot measures intended to preserve open space and limit urban sprawl.

The coalition forming around the idea of limiting sprawl includes environmentalists, farmers, big-city mayors, and some developers. But perhaps most important, the so-called "smart growth" movement also includes many suburban voters who are fed up with growth. For example ...