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Visualizing Native People In Philadelphia's Museums: Public Views And Student Reviews, Margaret Bruchac Jan 2018

Visualizing Native People In Philadelphia's Museums: Public Views And Student Reviews, Margaret Bruchac

Department of Anthropology Papers

Material representations of Indigenous history in public museums do more than merely present the past. Exhibitions are always incomplete and idiosyncratic, revealing only a small window into the social worlds of diverse human communities. Museums create, in essence, staged assemblages: compositions of objects, documents, portraits, and other material things that have been filtered through an array of influences. These influences—museological missions, collection processses, curatorial choices, loan possibilities, design concepts, research specialties, funding options, consultant opinions, space limitations, time limits, logistical challenges, etc.—will be unique for each museum and each collection. Taken together, they will inevitably determine which objects ...


Levi Levering's Headdress: Blurring Borders And Bridging Cultures, Margaret Bruchac Dec 2017

Levi Levering's Headdress: Blurring Borders And Bridging Cultures, Margaret Bruchac

Department of Anthropology Papers

The feather headdress labeled 38-2-1 in the Penn Museum Collection is richly colored and composed of many types of materials. It consists of a felt cap with a leather forehead band covered with a panel of vivid loomed beadwork (in orange, blue, yellow, and white tipi shapes) and two beaded rosettes (blue, yellow, white, and red) on either end of the band. Hanging from each side are ear pendants made of buckskin with metal beads attached, and dyed downy feathers and long ribbons trail from the headdress. Extending from the top of the band are felt cylinders (faded perhaps due ...


Object Matters: Considering Materiality, Meaning, And Memory, Margaret Bruchac Dec 2017

Object Matters: Considering Materiality, Meaning, And Memory, Margaret Bruchac

Department of Anthropology Papers

How do indigenous objects in museum collections "speak" to those who create, collect, curate, display, and observe them? The material traces in these objects obviously evoke connections to particular aesthetic values, beliefs, and practices, but do they also retain memories of the artisans who created them? Can these objects communicate across cultural and temporal boundaries? Do they have agency, outside of the people who handle them? How might the Native American objects in the Penn Museum, in particular, represent a "bundle of relations" that entangle collectors, collections, and communities?1 Students in my Fall 2017 "Anthropology of Museums" course at ...


Tangled Memories Of Wampum Diplomacy In Philadelphia, Margaret Bruchac Dec 2017

Tangled Memories Of Wampum Diplomacy In Philadelphia, Margaret Bruchac

Department of Anthropology Papers

Throughout North America, Indigenous Native American and First Nations histories are often presented as fragments of a broken past. Isolated objects, historical markers, archaeological sites, lost memories, curious folklore, and uninhabited places evoke memories of something that happened long ago, to someone else, in another time. The influential tribal individuals and nations who shaped and experienced those events are often depicted as tangential to the narrative of the emerging American nation, and imagined to have vanished from the scene. Yet, Indigenous histories are best seen as part of an on-going stream of events that are never entirely past, even (especially ...


In Situ 2017: University Of Pennsylvania Undergraduate Research Journal, Samantha Sharon Ashok, Ivana Kohut, Jessie Lu, Emma Mcnamara, Arielle Mae Pierson May 2017

In Situ 2017: University Of Pennsylvania Undergraduate Research Journal, Samantha Sharon Ashok, Ivana Kohut, Jessie Lu, Emma Mcnamara, Arielle Mae Pierson

In Situ

No abstract provided.


Anthrofest 2016, Antonia Diener, Megan Bridges, Eileen Wang, Zhenia Bemko, Benjamin Reynolds, Alexandria Mitchem, Ashley Terry, Ivana Kohut, Kelly Bridges Feb 2016

Anthrofest 2016, Antonia Diener, Megan Bridges, Eileen Wang, Zhenia Bemko, Benjamin Reynolds, Alexandria Mitchem, Ashley Terry, Ivana Kohut, Kelly Bridges

Anthrofest

The University of Pennsylvania anthropology annual undergraduate research conference known as ANTHROFEST brings together undergraduates involved in research across all concentrations in anthropology, as well as faculty and the broader undergraduate and graduate community. Each year, select students present and discuss their original research to the community at Penn. The conference is open to the public.


Sign And Image: Representations Of Plants On The Warka Vase Of Early Mesopotamia, Naomi F. Miller, Philip Jones, Holly Pittman Jan 2016

Sign And Image: Representations Of Plants On The Warka Vase Of Early Mesopotamia, Naomi F. Miller, Philip Jones, Holly Pittman

University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology Papers

The Warka Vase is an iconic artifact of Mesopotamia. In the absence of rigorous botanical study, the plants depicted on the lowest register are usually thought to be flax and grain. This analysis of the image identified as grain argues that its botanical characteristics, iconographical context and similarity to an archaic sign found in proto-writing demonstrates that it should be identified as a date palm sapling. It confirms the identification of flax. The correct identification of the plants furthers our understanding of possible symbolic continuities spanning the centuries that saw the codification of text as a representation of natural language.


Anthrofest 2015, Monica Fenton, Patrick Armstrong, Jim Elghammer, Jose Romero, Kristen Myers, Julia Chaterjee, Antonia Diener, Tanvi Mittall Feb 2015

Anthrofest 2015, Monica Fenton, Patrick Armstrong, Jim Elghammer, Jose Romero, Kristen Myers, Julia Chaterjee, Antonia Diener, Tanvi Mittall

Anthrofest

The University of Pennsylvania anthropology annual undergraduate research conference known as ANTHROFEST brings together undergraduates involved in research across all concentrations in anthropology, as well as faculty and the broader undergraduate and graduate community. Each year, select students present and discuss their original research to the community at Penn. The conference is open to the public.


Agro-Pastoral Strategies And Food Production On The Achaemenid Frontier In Central Asia: A Case Study Of Kyzyltepa In Southern Uzbekistan, Xin Wu, Naomi F. Miller, Pam Crabtree Jan 2015

Agro-Pastoral Strategies And Food Production On The Achaemenid Frontier In Central Asia: A Case Study Of Kyzyltepa In Southern Uzbekistan, Xin Wu, Naomi F. Miller, Pam Crabtree

University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology Papers

This article discusses aspects of the agro-pastoral economy of Kyzyltepa, a late Iron Age or Achaemenid period (sixth–fourth century BC) site in the Surkhandarya region of southern Uzbekistan. The analysis integrates archaeobotanical and zooarchaeological analyses with textual references to food production and provisioning in order to examine local agro-pastoral strategies. Preliminary results suggest an economy that included both an intensive agricultural component, with summer irrigation of millet, and a wider-ranging market-oriented pastoral component that provided meat to the settlement.


Indigenous Knowledge And Traditional Knowledge, Margaret Bruchac Jan 2014

Indigenous Knowledge And Traditional Knowledge, Margaret Bruchac

Department of Anthropology Papers

Over time, Indigenous peoples around the world have preserved distinctive understandings, rooted in cultural experience, that guide relations among human, non-human, and other-than human beings in specific ecosystems. These understandings and relations constitute a system broadly identified as Indigenous knowledge, also called traditional knowledge or aboriginal knowledge. Archaeologists conducting excavations in Indigenous locales may uncover physical evidence of Indigenous knowledge (e.g. artifacts, landscape modifications, ritual markers, stone carvings, faunal remains), but the meaning of this evidence may not be obvious to non-Indigenous or non-local investigators. Researchers can gain information and insight by consulting Indigenous traditions; these localized knowledges contain ...


My Sisters Will Not Speak: Boas, Hunt, And The Ethnographic Silencing Of First Nations Women, Margaret Bruchac Jan 2014

My Sisters Will Not Speak: Boas, Hunt, And The Ethnographic Silencing Of First Nations Women, Margaret Bruchac

Department of Anthropology Papers

First Nations women were instrumental to the collection of Northwest Coast Indigenous culture, yet their voices are nearly invisible in the published record. The contributions of George Hunt, the Tlingit/British culture broker who collaborated with anthropologist Franz Boas, overshadow the intellectual influence of his mother, Anislaga Mary Ebbetts, his sisters, and particularly his Kwakwaka'wakw wives, Lucy Homikanis and Tsukwani Francine. In his correspondence with Boas, Hunt admitted his dependence upon high-status Indigenous women, and he gave his female relatives visual prominence in film, photographs, and staged performances, but their voices are largely absent from anthropological texts. Hunt faced ...


Decolonization In Archaeological Theory, Margaret Bruchac Jan 2014

Decolonization In Archaeological Theory, Margaret Bruchac

Department of Anthropology Papers

Decolonizing approaches in archaeology emerged as a means to counter the dominance of colonial ideologies and improve the accuracy of Indigenous representations. Historically, the routines of mainstream archaeological practices have been shaped by Western (primarily elite Euro-American) beliefs and categories. Although Indigenous people have long been used as informants, Western scientists have exerted control over Indigenous property, and Indigenous knowledges and concerns have been pushed to the margins. Decolonizing has both political and practical effects; it alters power relations among scientists and subjects, while also expanding the volume and accuracy of available Indigenous data.


Anthrofest 2013, Charles Washington, Mike Chen, Lisa Doi, Sabine Harrington, Kyle De Sandes-Moyer, Liz Jacobs, Marguerite Leone, Divya Mishra Feb 2013

Anthrofest 2013, Charles Washington, Mike Chen, Lisa Doi, Sabine Harrington, Kyle De Sandes-Moyer, Liz Jacobs, Marguerite Leone, Divya Mishra

Anthrofest

The University of Pennsylvania anthropology annual undergraduate research conference known as ANTHROFEST brings together undergraduates involved in research across all concentrations in anthropology, as well as faculty and the broader undergraduate and graduate community. Each year, select students present and discuss their original research to the community at Penn. The conference is open to the public.


Raised Fields As Monumental Farmed Landscapes, Lake Titicaca, South America, Clark L. Erickson Jan 2013

Raised Fields As Monumental Farmed Landscapes, Lake Titicaca, South America, Clark L. Erickson

Department of Anthropology Papers

Circumstances Under Which the Garden was Investigated

In the 1960s and 1970s, vast landscapes of abandoned pre-Columbian raised fields were documented in Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Colombia, Suriname, and Guyana. This form of intensive agriculture is associated with large and dense sedentary populations and in some cases sustained complex sociopolitical organizations. Raised fields are large elevated planting platforms designed to provide drainage and improve soil conditions and fertility. Deep water-filled canals alongside the platforms provide moisture during dry periods, protect crops against frost, and produce organic matter for sustained harvests.


Gordion: Managing An Open-Air Archaeological Site As A Garden, Naomi F. Miller Aug 2012

Gordion: Managing An Open-Air Archaeological Site As A Garden, Naomi F. Miller

University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology Papers

Vegetation cover is managed to enhance the preservation of the archaeological ruins at Gordion, Turkey. We use our knowledge of the habits and growth cycles of the native vegetation to determine which plants should be encouraged or discouraged to grow in the excavated. For the surfaces of tumuli and unexcavated settlement mounds, minimal intervention can have dramatic results for remarkably little effort, and can be thought of as parkland. In particular, fencing to keep animals and children off the biggest mound allowed the vegetation cover to improve rapidly, so there is much less erosion. The excavated area with exposed architecture ...


On The Edge Of Empire: 2008 And 2009 Excavations At Oğlanqala, Azerbaijan, Lauren Ristvet, Hilary Gopnik, Veli Bakhshaliyev, Hannah Lau, Safar Ashurov, Robert Bryant Apr 2012

On The Edge Of Empire: 2008 And 2009 Excavations At Oğlanqala, Azerbaijan, Lauren Ristvet, Hilary Gopnik, Veli Bakhshaliyev, Hannah Lau, Safar Ashurov, Robert Bryant

Department of Anthropology Papers

The nature of political complexity in the Caucasus has emerged as a significant research question in Near Eastern archaeology. Until recently, archaeological developments in Azerbaijan have been left out of this discussion. Two seasons of survey and excavation undertaken by the Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences and the University of Pennsylvania at the Iron Age site of Oğlanqala in the Naxçıvan Autonomous Republic of Azerbaijan have begun to clarify the local origins of an Iron Age polity and its relationship to major Near Eastern empires, including Urartu, Achaemenid Persia, and Parthia. Situated in the northern half of the fertile Şərur ...


Anthrofest 2012, Jennifer Mcauley, Alexander Niculescu, Paul Mitchell, Julia Mclean, Monika Wasik, Myles Karp, Ollin Venegas, Alex Tickle Feb 2012

Anthrofest 2012, Jennifer Mcauley, Alexander Niculescu, Paul Mitchell, Julia Mclean, Monika Wasik, Myles Karp, Ollin Venegas, Alex Tickle

Anthrofest

The University of Pennsylvania anthropology annual undergraduate research conference known as ANTHROFEST brings together undergraduates involved in research across all concentrations in anthropology, as well as faculty and the broader undergraduate and graduate community. Each year, select students present and discuss their original research to the community at Penn. The conference is open to the public.


Mobility And Variation In Chalcolithic North Gujarat, India (Ca 3600 – 1800 Bc), Suzanne Harris Aug 2011

Mobility And Variation In Chalcolithic North Gujarat, India (Ca 3600 – 1800 Bc), Suzanne Harris

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

Nine relatively obscure sites in the northern plain of Gujarat, India: Loteshwar, Santhli, Datrana, Nagwada, Langhnaj, Zekhada, Ratanpura and Kanewal; demonstrate a broad range of material culture traditions present in this region throughout the fourth through second millennia BC. This diversity results from the numerous economic strategies employed by the inhabitants of this region, the most important of which is mobility. Most of the sites reviewed in this work are the remains of temporary occupations, which are usually ascribed to pastoral nomads. Although pastoralism was an important subsistence strategy, a closer examination of the material culture and features at these ...


A Molecular Anthropological Study Of Altaian Histories Utilizing Population Genetics And Phylogeography, Matthew Dulik May 2011

A Molecular Anthropological Study Of Altaian Histories Utilizing Population Genetics And Phylogeography, Matthew Dulik

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

This dissertation explores the genetic histories of several populations living in the Altai Republic of Russia. It employs an approach combining methods from population genetics and phylogeography to characterize genetic diversity in these populations, and places the results in a molecular anthropological context. Previously, researchers used anthropological, historical, ethnographic and linguistic evidence to categorize the indigenous inhabitants of the Altai into two groups – northern and southern Altaians. Genetic data obtained in this study were therefore used to determine whether these anthropological groupings resulted from historical processes involving different source populations, and if the observed geographical and anthropological separation between northern ...


Leaves That Sway: Gold Xianbei Cap Ornaments From Northeast China, Sarah Laursen May 2011

Leaves That Sway: Gold Xianbei Cap Ornaments From Northeast China, Sarah Laursen

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

Over the last fifty years, rich finds of gold objects have been uncovered in China’s northeastern Liaoning province. These tombs belonged to a tribe of steppe nomads called the Murong Xianbei who settled north of the Great Wall during the Han dynasty and established a succession of short-lived states called Yan that ruled parts of Northeast Asia during the third to fifth centuries CE. Until now, the history of the Murong and the rapidly emerging field of Murong archaeology have been published almost exclusively in Chinese. This dissertation seeks to rectify the lack of Western scholarship about this unique ...


Anthrofest 2011, Jennifer Mcauley, Elaine Yang, Molly Hude, Sascha Murillo, Hayley Germack, Madeleine Macks, Myles Karp, Paul Mitchell, Lydia Gau, Cassandra Turcotte, Kym Cole, Sarah Macintosh, Catalina Villamil, Lauren Kapsalakis Feb 2011

Anthrofest 2011, Jennifer Mcauley, Elaine Yang, Molly Hude, Sascha Murillo, Hayley Germack, Madeleine Macks, Myles Karp, Paul Mitchell, Lydia Gau, Cassandra Turcotte, Kym Cole, Sarah Macintosh, Catalina Villamil, Lauren Kapsalakis

Anthrofest

The University of Pennsylvania anthropology annual undergraduate research conference known as ANTHROFEST brings together undergraduates involved in research across all concentrations in anthropology, as well as faculty and the broader undergraduate and graduate community. Each year, select students present and discuss their original research to the community at Penn. The conference is open to the public.


Travel And The Making Of North Mesopotamian Polities, Lauren Ristvet Feb 2011

Travel And The Making Of North Mesopotamian Polities, Lauren Ristvet

Department of Anthropology Papers

The emergence of political complexity in northern Mesopotamia ca. 2600 b.c. constituted an important cultural revolution which transformed how people within nascent states understood their communities. This study explores the relationship between inclusive and exclusive political strategies and free and limited access to a range of political and ritual spaces in cities and the countryside. First, it considers how the spatial organization of new cities constructed a particular type of political authority. Second, it reanalyzes several cultic monuments in light of the Ebla texts and Syrian ritual scenes and suggests that they formed pilgrimage networks that were interconnected with ...


Introduction: Sustainable Lifeways, Naomi F. Miller, Katherine M. Moore Jan 2011

Introduction: Sustainable Lifeways, Naomi F. Miller, Katherine M. Moore

University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology Papers

No abstract provided.


The Dualities Of Endurance: A Collaborative Historical Archaeology Of Ethnogenesis At Brothertown, 1780-1910, Craig N. Cipolla May 2010

The Dualities Of Endurance: A Collaborative Historical Archaeology Of Ethnogenesis At Brothertown, 1780-1910, Craig N. Cipolla

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

The Brothertown Indian community formed in the late 18th century when segments of several tribal groups from coastal northeastern North America broke away from their home settlements to move west together. What united the community was a shared belief in Christianity, a dedication to practices of agriculture, and hopes of escaping the land politics and corrupting influences of colonial culture on the East Coast. This dissertation investigates the ethnogenesis, evolution, and endurance of the Brothertown Indian community from the perspective of collaborative historical archaeology. In doing so, it aims to reassess theories of culture, identity, and discourse in the modern ...


Philadelphia Foodways Ca. 1750-1850: An Historical Archaeology Of Cuisine, Teagan A. Schweitzer May 2010

Philadelphia Foodways Ca. 1750-1850: An Historical Archaeology Of Cuisine, Teagan A. Schweitzer

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

This research utilizes historical archaeology in the examination of the foodways and food landscape of Philadelphia ca. 1750-1850. The method employed here combines archaeological and documentary research to explore historic food habits and culinary practices. Primary research consists of analysis of animal bones from three sites located in and around Philadelphia including the Speaker’s House, Stenton, and the National Constitution Center. Additionally archaeobotanical materials are examined from the National Constitution Center site. These datasets are combined with faunal and floral analyses from other Philadelphia archaeological sites in order to facilitate an examination of the foodways of the city as ...


From Food And Fuel To Farms And Flocks: The Integration Of Plant And Animal Remains In The Study Of The Agropastoral Economy At Gordion, Turkey, Naomi F. Miller, Melinda A. Zeder, Susan R. Arter Dec 2009

From Food And Fuel To Farms And Flocks: The Integration Of Plant And Animal Remains In The Study Of The Agropastoral Economy At Gordion, Turkey, Naomi F. Miller, Melinda A. Zeder, Susan R. Arter

University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology Papers

The site of Gordion, Turkey, provides a case study of the integrated use of archaeobiological data. Associations between botanical and faunal remains suggest a continuum of land‐use practices. At one end, high ratios of the seeds of wild plants versus cultivated cereal grains (calculated as count/weight) and high proportions of the bones of sheep, goat, and deer are signatures of a subsistence economy focused on pastoral production. At the other, low wild/cereal ratios along with high proportions of the bones of cattle, pig, and hare indicate an economy more focused on agriculture. Based on the millennium‐long ...


Power Politics In The Xiongnu Empire, Bryan K. Miller Aug 2009

Power Politics In The Xiongnu Empire, Bryan K. Miller

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

This thesis employs an integrated approach of the historical and archaeological evidence relevant to the study of the Xiongnu empire (3rd century BC – 1st century AD) in an attempt to construct new contexts of understanding the political strategies for securing and ensuring power, legitimacy, and authority in the steppes. I have relied upon the full corpus of Chinese records which address the Xiongnu entity, synthesized the entirety of excavated materials in China, South Siberia, and Mongolia which relate to the Xiongnu phenomenon, and incorporated new survey and excavation data from two regions of the Xiongnu empire. Through the course of ...


The Khalub-Tree In Mesopotamia: Myth Or Reality?, Naomi F. Miller, Alhena Gadotti Jan 2009

The Khalub-Tree In Mesopotamia: Myth Or Reality?, Naomi F. Miller, Alhena Gadotti

University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology Papers

No abstract provided.


Gold Before The Palaces: Crafting Jewelry And Social Identity In Minoan Crete, Jane Hickman Jan 2008

Gold Before The Palaces: Crafting Jewelry And Social Identity In Minoan Crete, Jane Hickman

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

During the period c. 2000 – 1800 BC, the first civilization was established in Europe, as illustrated by the development of palace-centered societies in Minoan Crete. However, the extent to which stratified society existed before the second millennium BC is unclear. This study focuses on the development of ranked society in prepalatial Crete, as evidenced by the manufacturing, use, and deposition of gold and silver jewelry. Indications of social stratification are also explored in the material remains of sites where jewelry was recovered.

Research objectives include an investigation of where, how, and why new forms of jewelry appeared in Crete and ...


Serendipity: Secrets Of The Mudballs, Naomi F. Miller, Kimberly E. Leaman, Julie Unruh Nov 2006

Serendipity: Secrets Of The Mudballs, Naomi F. Miller, Kimberly E. Leaman, Julie Unruh

University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology Papers

A surprising amount of archaeological discovery consists simply of connecting the disparate bits of information that an average archaeologist holds in her mind. Such a connection occurred recently at the Museum’s research project in Gordion, Turkey, leading us to a new insight into ancient textile production.