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UMass Metabolic Network Publications

Biochemistry

Metabolism

Publication Year

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Molecular Biology

Critical Role For Arginase 2 In Obesity-Associated Pancreatic Cancer, Tamara Zaytouni, Pei-Yun Tsai, Daniel S. Hitchcock, Cory D. Dubois, Elizaveta Freinkman, Lin Lin, Vicente Morales-Oyarvide, Patrick J. Lenehan, Brian M. Wolpin, Mari Mino-Kenudson, Eduardo M. Torres, Nicholas Stylopoulos, Clary B. Clish, Nada Y. Kalaany Aug 2017

Critical Role For Arginase 2 In Obesity-Associated Pancreatic Cancer, Tamara Zaytouni, Pei-Yun Tsai, Daniel S. Hitchcock, Cory D. Dubois, Elizaveta Freinkman, Lin Lin, Vicente Morales-Oyarvide, Patrick J. Lenehan, Brian M. Wolpin, Mari Mino-Kenudson, Eduardo M. Torres, Nicholas Stylopoulos, Clary B. Clish, Nada Y. Kalaany

UMass Metabolic Network Publications

Obesity is an established risk factor for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Despite recent identification of metabolic alterations in this lethal malignancy, the metabolic dependencies of obesity-associated PDA remain unknown. Here we show that obesity-driven PDA exhibits accelerated growth and a striking transcriptional enrichment for pathways regulating nitrogen metabolism. We find that the mitochondrial form of arginase (ARG2), which hydrolyzes arginine into ornithine and urea, is induced upon obesity, and silencing or loss of ARG2 markedly suppresses PDA. In vivo infusion of (15)N-glutamine in obese mouse models of PDA demonstrates enhanced nitrogen flux into the urea cycle and infusion of ...


Cancer Metabolism: Fueling More Than Just Growth, Namgyu Lee, Dohoon Kim Dec 2016

Cancer Metabolism: Fueling More Than Just Growth, Namgyu Lee, Dohoon Kim

UMass Metabolic Network Publications

The early landmark discoveries in cancer metabolism research have uncovered metabolic processes that support rapid proliferation, such as aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect), glutaminolysis, and increased nucleotide biosynthesis. However, there are limitations to the effectiveness of specifically targeting the metabolic processes which support rapid proliferation. First, as other normal proliferative tissues also share similar metabolic features, they may also be affected by such treatments. Secondly, targeting proliferative metabolism may only target the highly proliferating "bulk tumor" cells and not the slower-growing, clinically relevant cancer stem cell subpopulations which may be required for an effective cure. An emerging body of research indicates ...