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Full-Text Articles in Law and Race

Examining Racial & Ethnic Disparities In The Reach Of The Medicare Shared Savings Program, Lindsey Arneson Dec 2019

Examining Racial & Ethnic Disparities In The Reach Of The Medicare Shared Savings Program, Lindsey Arneson

Capstone Experience

It is important to understand the quality of health care for racial and ethnic minorities covered under the largest U.S. government-run insurance program, Medicare, because the demographics of the U.S. are becoming older and more diverse. A new value-based program under Medicare is the Shared Savings Program (MSSP), which creates incentives to improve care quality and health outcomes for Medicare beneficiaries with a specific focus on increasing the provision of preventive care services. This capstone project aims to understand the representation of racial/ethnic minority Medicare beneficiaries, namely African Americans/Blacks and Hispanics/Latinxs, that receive care from ...


Critical Reviews Of Flawed Research On Prostitution, Donna M. Hughes Nov 2019

Critical Reviews Of Flawed Research On Prostitution, Donna M. Hughes

Dignity: A Journal on Sexual Exploitation and Violence

No abstract provided.


Population Law And Policy: From Control And Contraception To Equity And Equality, Victoria Mather Oct 2019

Population Law And Policy: From Control And Contraception To Equity And Equality, Victoria Mather

St. Mary's Law Journal

Abstract forthcoming


Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review Sep 2019

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Got Mylk?: The Disruptive Possibilities Of Plant Milk, Iselin Gambert May 2019

Got Mylk?: The Disruptive Possibilities Of Plant Milk, Iselin Gambert

Brooklyn Law Review

Milk is one of the most ubiquitous and heavily regulated substances on the planet—and perhaps one of the most contested. It is tied closely to notions of purity, health, and femininity, and is seen as so central to human civilization that our own galaxy—the Milky Way—is named after it. But despite its wholesome reputation, milk has long had a sinister side, being bound up with the exploitation of the (human and nonhuman) bodies it comes from and being a symbol of and tool for white dominance and superiority. The word itself, in verb form, means “to exploit ...


Chronic Harm, Ann Kennedy Apr 2019

Chronic Harm, Ann Kennedy

William & Mary Journal of Race, Gender, and Social Justice

No abstract provided.


"I Assumed Chicago Would Be In The Forefront": Comments On The Movement To End Prostitution With Survivor-Leader Brenda Myers-Powell, Jody Raphael Apr 2019

"I Assumed Chicago Would Be In The Forefront": Comments On The Movement To End Prostitution With Survivor-Leader Brenda Myers-Powell, Jody Raphael

Dignity: A Journal on Sexual Exploitation and Violence

For many years in the 2000’s, researcher Jody Raphael, teamed with prostitution-survivor Brenda Myers-Powell, undertook a myriad of speaking engagements in the Chicago metropolitan area, intended to raise awareness of the violence and coercion in the sex trade industry. Ten years ago, they were asked to make a video of their presentation. Recently, Dignity editors came across the video and asked for an update on the conversation. This piece is the result.


Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review Feb 2019

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Ethical Cannabis Lawyering In California, Francis J. Mootz Iii Dec 2018

Ethical Cannabis Lawyering In California, Francis J. Mootz Iii

St. Mary's Journal on Legal Malpractice & Ethics

Cannabis has a long history in the United States. Originally, doctors and pharmacists used cannabis for a variety of purposes. After the Mexican Revolution led to widespread migration from Mexico to the United States, many Americans responded by associating this influx of foreigners with the use of cannabis, and thereby racializing and stigmatizing the drug. After the collapse of prohibition, the federal government repurposed its enormous enforcement bureaucracy to address the perceived problem of cannabis, despite the opposition of the American Medical Association to this new prohibition. Ultimately, both the states and the federal government classified cannabis as a dangerous ...


Undocumented Citizens Of The United States: The Repercussions Of Denying Birth Certificates, Anna L. Lichtenberger Jan 2018

Undocumented Citizens Of The United States: The Repercussions Of Denying Birth Certificates, Anna L. Lichtenberger

St. Mary's Law Journal

Abstract forthcoming


Open Source: The Enewsletter Of Rwu Law 09-22-2017, Roger Williams University School Of Law Sep 2017

Open Source: The Enewsletter Of Rwu Law 09-22-2017, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Beyond The Money: Expected (And Unexpected) Consequences Of America's War On Drugs, Cynthia Brown Jun 2017

Beyond The Money: Expected (And Unexpected) Consequences Of America's War On Drugs, Cynthia Brown

Lincoln Memorial University Law Review

The purpose of this paper is to provide a high-level survey of our nation’s prohibition policies within the context of the costs of the law enforcement efforts upholding those policies. The discussion will offer a cursory review of the economic expense of the war on drugs with tangential coverage of the constitutional, institutional and intangible expenses that are inseparable from an assessment of the costs of America’s drug control efforts. Part I provides a historical review of illicit drug use in the United States, while Part II supplies the evolution of the country’s efforts to codify its ...


Tackling The Social Determinants Of Health: A Central Role For Providers, Jessica Mantel Mar 2017

Tackling The Social Determinants Of Health: A Central Role For Providers, Jessica Mantel

Georgia State University Law Review

Americans’ poor health and high health care costs largely stem from social, environmental, and behavioral factors that adversely impact health. Yet, health care providers traditionally have neglected the social determinants of health, focusing instead on medically treating patients’ symptoms. As a result, addressing the social determinants of health has primarily been the domain of government and community groups. Unfortunately, the efforts of the public health and social services sectors are stymied by chronic underfunding, a situation unlikely to change in the current political environment. This article identifies a potential solution to this problem: recent health care reforms that encourage health ...


Whose Responsibility Is It To Prep For Safe Sex? Archaic Hiv Criminalization And Modern Medicine, Brigid Bone Jan 2017

Whose Responsibility Is It To Prep For Safe Sex? Archaic Hiv Criminalization And Modern Medicine, Brigid Bone

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

This Note traces the history of HIV and its impact on the homosexual community, with a focus on criminal statutes that attempted to regulate the actions of individuals with HIV, and how those statutes can be evaluated considering modern advancements against the virus. Bone addresses the state of HIV criminalization bearing in mind medical treatments, such as Highly Effected Antiretroviral Treatment (HAART) and Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP), as well as conviction rates among those who engage in sexual activity while HIV positive. Bone proposes amending current criminalization statutes in a way that would de-stigmatize the conversation that surrounds the virus while ...


Black Health Matters: Disparities, Community Health, And Interest Convergence, Mary Crossley Oct 2016

Black Health Matters: Disparities, Community Health, And Interest Convergence, Mary Crossley

Michigan Journal of Race and Law

Health disparities represent a significant strand in the fabric of racial injustice in the United States, one that has proven exceptionally durable. Many millions of dollars have been invested in addressing racial disparities over the past three decades. Researchers have identified disparities, unpacked their causes, and tracked their trajectories, with only limited progress in narrowing the health gap between whites and racial and ethnic minorities. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the movement toward value-based payment methods for health care may supply a new avenue for addressing disparities. This Article argues that the ACA’s requirement that ...


Newsroom: Horwitz On Marijuana Legalization 7/15/2016, John S. Kiernan, Roger Williams University School Of Law Jul 2016

Newsroom: Horwitz On Marijuana Legalization 7/15/2016, John S. Kiernan, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Politically Correct Eugenics, Seema Mohapatra Jan 2016

Politically Correct Eugenics, Seema Mohapatra

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Beyond Baby Steps An Empirical Study Of The Impact Of Environmental Justice Executive Order 12898, Elizabeth Ann Glass Geltman, Gunwant Gill, Miriam Jovanovic Jan 2016

Beyond Baby Steps An Empirical Study Of The Impact Of Environmental Justice Executive Order 12898, Elizabeth Ann Glass Geltman, Gunwant Gill, Miriam Jovanovic

Publications and Research

This study evaluated the impact of Executive Order (EO) 12898 to advance environmental justice. We conducted a review evaluating the frequency and effective use of EO 12898 since execution with particular focus following President Obama’s Plan EJ 2014. We found that both EO 12898 and Plan EJ 2104 had little, if any, impact on federal regulatory decision making. To the extent federal agencies discussed EO 12898, most did so in boilerplate rhetoric that satisfied compliance but was devoid of detailed thought or analysis. In the 21st year, with the exception of the Environmental Protection Agency, very little federal regulatory ...


Do Black Lives Matter? Race As A Measure Of Injury In Tort Law, 18 Scholar: St. Mary's L. Rev. & Soc. Just. 41 (2016), Alberto Bernabe Jan 2016

Do Black Lives Matter? Race As A Measure Of Injury In Tort Law, 18 Scholar: St. Mary's L. Rev. & Soc. Just. 41 (2016), Alberto Bernabe

UIC John Marshall Law School Open Access Faculty Scholarship

Discussions of race-related issues are a constant in American society. Within the last year alone, there have been several high profile events that have prompted important debates about race. Most of the events attracting nationwide attention involved the conduct of law enforcement agents, including incidents in which unarmed black men died at the hands of police officers, peaceful protests that turned violent following the failure to indict the police officers involved in those cases and the use of excessive force on black teenagers attending social events and while at school. Other events included the racial identity controversy regarding a member ...


Can Access To A Medical-Legal Partnership Benefit Patients With Asthma Who Live In An Urban Community?, Robert Pettignano, Lisa Bliss, Sylvia Caley Nov 2015

Can Access To A Medical-Legal Partnership Benefit Patients With Asthma Who Live In An Urban Community?, Robert Pettignano, Lisa Bliss, Sylvia Caley

Sylvia B. Caley

Approximately one in 10 children in the U.S. has a diagnosis of asthma. African American and low-income children are more likely to be diagnosed with asthma. They are more likely to suffer the worse outcomes because of low socioeconomic status and environmental exposures. A medical-legal partnership is an interdisciplinary collaboration between a medical entity such as a hospital or clinic and a legal entity such as a lawyer, law school, or legal aid society created to address barriers to health care access and limitations to well-being. Addressing the legal concerns of these patients can improve access to medical services ...


Keynote Remarks: Re-Tooling Law And Legal Education For Food System Reform: Food Law And Policy In Practice, Emily M. Broad Leib Jul 2015

Keynote Remarks: Re-Tooling Law And Legal Education For Food System Reform: Food Law And Policy In Practice, Emily M. Broad Leib

Seattle University Law Review

Thank you for the opportunity to be with you today and to take part in this symposium on the important role law schools and lawyers can play in changing our food system. Food preferences and food choices are incredibly personal, but the way we produce and consume food, and its impacts on our environment, public health, and the safety of ourselves and others, make it a pressing societal issue as well.


The 2014 Farm Bill: Farm Subsidies And Food Oppression, Andrea Freeman Jun 2015

The 2014 Farm Bill: Farm Subsidies And Food Oppression, Andrea Freeman

Seattle University Law Review

The 2014 Farm Bill ushered in some significant and surprising changes. One of these was that it rendered the identity of all the recipients of farm subsidies secret. Representative Larry Combest, who is now a lobbyist for agribusiness, first introduced a secrecy provision into the bill in 2000. The provision, however, only applied to subsidies made in the form of crop insurance. Until 2014, the majority of subsidies were direct payments and the identity of the people who received them was public information. In fact, the Environmental Working Group’s release of the list of recipients led to a series ...


Toward A Structural Theory Of Implicit Racial And Ethnic Bias In Health Care, Dayna Bowen Matthew Jan 2015

Toward A Structural Theory Of Implicit Racial And Ethnic Bias In Health Care, Dayna Bowen Matthew

Articles

No abstract provided.


Empowering And Protecting Patients: Lessons For Physician-Assisted Suicide From The African-American Experience, Leslie E. Wolf, Patricia A. King Oct 2014

Empowering And Protecting Patients: Lessons For Physician-Assisted Suicide From The African-American Experience, Leslie E. Wolf, Patricia A. King

Leslie E. Wolf

No abstract provided.


Insurance Mandates: Colorectal Cancer Screening Utilization And Racial/Ethnic Disparities, Michael Preston Aug 2014

Insurance Mandates: Colorectal Cancer Screening Utilization And Racial/Ethnic Disparities, Michael Preston

Michael Preston

Colorectal Cancer is the third most common cancer found in men and women in the United states. In 2014, the American Cancer Society estimates over 136,000 new cases of colorectal cancer and approximately 50,000 deaths. Although the overall death rate for colorectal cancer has decreased over the past 20 years, disparities remain among medically underserved populations.


The Human Costs Of “Free Association”: Socio-Cultural Narratives And The Legal Battle For Micronesian Health In Hawai'i, 47 J. Marshall L. Rev. 1377 (2014), Susan Serrano Jan 2014

The Human Costs Of “Free Association”: Socio-Cultural Narratives And The Legal Battle For Micronesian Health In Hawai'i, 47 J. Marshall L. Rev. 1377 (2014), Susan Serrano

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Health Care, Title Vi, And Racism's New Normal, Dayna Bowen Matthew Jan 2014

Health Care, Title Vi, And Racism's New Normal, Dayna Bowen Matthew

Articles

No abstract provided.


Aggressive Policing And The Mental Health Of Young Urban Men, Amanda Geller, Jeffrey Fagan, Tom Tyler, Bruce Link Jan 2014

Aggressive Policing And The Mental Health Of Young Urban Men, Amanda Geller, Jeffrey Fagan, Tom Tyler, Bruce Link

Faculty Scholarship

We provide the first population-based analysis of the mental health implications of contemporary policing. Many cities have adopted “proactive” policing models, which engage citizens – often aggressively – at low levels of suspicion. We survey young men on their experiences of police encounters and subsequent mental health. We conducted a population-based phone survey of 1,261 young men in New York City. Respondents reported how many times they were approached by New York Police Department (NYPD) officers, what these encounters entailed, any trauma they attributed to the stops, and their overall anxiety. Data were analyzed using cross-sectional regressions. Participants reporting more police ...


Preface, Paul A. Lombardo Jan 2012

Preface, Paul A. Lombardo

Paul A. Lombardo

Introduction to a volume chronicling the 20th Century North Carolina eugenic sterilization program and the investigative journalism that prompted the state to apologize for it


Litigating Against An Epidemic: Hiv/Aids And The Promise Of Socioeconomic Rights In South Africa, Nathaniel Bruhn Sep 2011

Litigating Against An Epidemic: Hiv/Aids And The Promise Of Socioeconomic Rights In South Africa, Nathaniel Bruhn

Michigan Journal of Race and Law

With one of the highest incidence rates in the world, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has taken a large toll on South Africa. Despite medical advances that have made the disease more manageable, many South Africans still do not have access to the medicines needed to control the disease. At the same time, the Constitution of South Africa grants individuals far-reaching socioeconomic rights, including the right to access health care. This Comment explores the intersection of the socioeconomic rights and the HIV/AIDS crisis. Although the Constitutional Court has developed a deferential approach to enforcing socioeconomic rights, substantial room remains to ...