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Patent Pilot Program Perspectives: Patent Litigation In The Northern District Of Illinois, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 348 (2018) Jan 2018

Patent Pilot Program Perspectives: Patent Litigation In The Northern District Of Illinois, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 348 (2018)

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

A Patent Pilot Program, or PPP, is geared towards giving designated judges in various districts more experience with patent cases. The Volume 17 RIPL Executive Board interviewed several participating judges in the Northern District of Illinois’ PPP.

This note is comprised of interviews with Judge Thomas M. Durkin, Judge Matthew F. Kennelly, and Judge Rebecca R. Pallmeyer of the United States District Court, Northern District of Illinois; taken over the course of May and June of 2017 by the Volume 17 RIPL Board members Kaylee Willis and Benjamin Lockyer. Its contents compile a uniform effort by both the judges interviewed ...


Ahead Of His Time: Cardozo And The Current Debates On Professional Responsibility, 34 Touro L. Rev. 63 (2018), Alberto Bernabe Jan 2018

Ahead Of His Time: Cardozo And The Current Debates On Professional Responsibility, 34 Touro L. Rev. 63 (2018), Alberto Bernabe

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


I Dissent: The Federal Circuit’S “Great Dissenter,” Her Influence On The Patent Dialogue, And Why It Matters, 19 Vand. J. Ent. & Tech. 873 (2017), Daryl Lim Jan 2017

I Dissent: The Federal Circuit’S “Great Dissenter,” Her Influence On The Patent Dialogue, And Why It Matters, 19 Vand. J. Ent. & Tech. 873 (2017), Daryl Lim

Faculty Scholarship

This Article is the first study to comprehensively explore the centrality of the patent dialogue at the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, the nation’s principal patent court from empirical, doctrinal, and policy perspectives. It offers several insights into how the Federal Circuit reaches consensus and when it does not, serving as a window into its inner workings, a reference to academics, judges, and attorneys alike. More broadly, this Article provides a template to study the “legal dialogue” of other judges at the Federal Circuit, those in other Circuits, as well as those in other areas of the ...


“Who Is Really Deciding Your Case?” A Path To Restore Judicial Independence And Impartiality After Citizens United, 51 J. Marshall L. Rev. 167 (2017), Anthony Morelli Jan 2017

“Who Is Really Deciding Your Case?” A Path To Restore Judicial Independence And Impartiality After Citizens United, 51 J. Marshall L. Rev. 167 (2017), Anthony Morelli

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Enhancing Justice Administration In Nigeria Through Information And Communications Technology, 32 J. Marshall J. Info. Tech. & Privacy L. 89 (2016), Halima Doma Jan 2016

Enhancing Justice Administration In Nigeria Through Information And Communications Technology, 32 J. Marshall J. Info. Tech. & Privacy L. 89 (2016), Halima Doma

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

The end of the twentieth century brought about the system of In-formation Communication Technologies (“ICT”) which represents the start of a new era. Communication is faster and more efficient than ever before. As a result, the world is brought closer together. Our means of communication and social interactions have changed dramatically. Due to the technological communication advances, we are no longer tied to our desks to make phone calls or have to travel thousands of miles for meetings. ICT enables us to contact friends, family and business colleagues at the touch of a button whatever the time, wherever the place ...


The Call And The Response: The Call, The 1991 Open Letter From Federal Judge A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., And The 25 Years Of Response From Justice Clarence Thomas, 49 J. Marshall L. Rev. 925 (2016), Angela Mae Kupenda Jan 2016

The Call And The Response: The Call, The 1991 Open Letter From Federal Judge A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., And The 25 Years Of Response From Justice Clarence Thomas, 49 J. Marshall L. Rev. 925 (2016), Angela Mae Kupenda

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


What Reversals And Close Cases Reveal About Claim Construction: The Sequel, 13 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 525 (2014), Thomas Krause, Heather Auyang Jan 2014

What Reversals And Close Cases Reveal About Claim Construction: The Sequel, 13 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 525 (2014), Thomas Krause, Heather Auyang

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

This article updates and elaborates on last year’s What Close Cases and Reversals Reveal About Claim Construction at the Federal Circuit. Like the previous article, this article provides empirical insight into claim construction at the Federal Circuit, by approaching the question with two unique and distinct subsets of data: (1) “reversals” of all district court claim construction decisions since Phillips v. AWH, and (2) “close cases,” or post-Markman claim construction cases that had dissents in which a currently-active judge participated. The past year’s reversals data once again confirms that district courts persistently favor narrow claim interpretations in cases ...


Supreme Court Leaks And Recusals: A Response To Professor Steven Lubet’S Scotus Ethics In The Wake Of Nfib V. Sebelius, 47 Val. U. L. Rev. 925 (2013), Kevin Hopkins Jan 2013

Supreme Court Leaks And Recusals: A Response To Professor Steven Lubet’S Scotus Ethics In The Wake Of Nfib V. Sebelius, 47 Val. U. L. Rev. 925 (2013), Kevin Hopkins

Faculty Scholarship

As Professor Steven Lubet notes in his article, Stonewalling, Leaks, and Counter-Leaks: SCOTUS Ethics in the Wake of NFIB v. Sebelius, the ethical conduct of Supreme Court Justices has once again gained national attention. This time, however, the context for public outcry is due to actions of an in-house source who released confidential information to a member of the press concerning the voting behavior and the overall sentiments of members of the Court's minority in one of the most significant and controversial rulings of the year: NFIB v. Sebelius (the "Affordable Care Act"). Professor Lubet uses this leaking of ...


The Law And Science Of Video Game Violence: What Was Lost In Translation?, 31 Cardozo Arts & Ent. L.J. 297 (2013), William K. Ford Jan 2013

The Law And Science Of Video Game Violence: What Was Lost In Translation?, 31 Cardozo Arts & Ent. L.J. 297 (2013), William K. Ford

Faculty Scholarship

"[A]s a general rule," writes Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Edward Humes, "courts don't do science very well."' Susan Haack, a professor of law and philosophy, elaborates on why this may be true, offering several reasons for "deep tensions" between science and law. The reasons offered by Haack may be less of a concern where the dispute involves litigation against the government on significant questions of public policy. Recent decisions assessing the constitutionality of laws restricting minors' access to violent video games therefore offer an opportunity to examine how well the courts handled scientific evidence in a situation lacking some ...


We, The Judges: The Legalized Subject And Narratives Of Adjudication In Reality Television, 81 Umkc L. Rev. 1 (2012), Cynthia D. Bond Jan 2012

We, The Judges: The Legalized Subject And Narratives Of Adjudication In Reality Television, 81 Umkc L. Rev. 1 (2012), Cynthia D. Bond

Faculty Scholarship

At first a cultural oddity, reality television is now a cultural commonplace. These quasi-documentaries proliferate on a wide range of network and cable channels, proving adaptable to any audience demographic. Across a variety of types of "reality" offerings, narratives of adjudication replete with "judges," "juries," and "verdicts"-abound. Do these judgment formations simply reflect the often competitive structure or subtext of reality TV? Or is there a deeper, more constitutive connection between reality TV as a genre and narratives of law and adjudication? This article looks beyond the many "judge shows" popular on reality TV (e.g., Judge Judy') to ...


Session I: The Legacy Of Justice Arthur Goldberg, 29 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 285 (2012), Samuel R. Olken, Gerald Berendt, Gilbert A. Cornfield, Gilbert Feldman, David Stebenne, Milton I. Shadur Jan 2012

Session I: The Legacy Of Justice Arthur Goldberg, 29 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 285 (2012), Samuel R. Olken, Gerald Berendt, Gilbert A. Cornfield, Gilbert Feldman, David Stebenne, Milton I. Shadur

The John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

No abstract provided.


New Law, Old Cases, Fair Outcomes: Why The Illinois Supreme Court Must Overrule People V Flowers, 43 Loy. U. Chi. L.J. 727 (2012), Timothy P. O'Neill Jan 2012

New Law, Old Cases, Fair Outcomes: Why The Illinois Supreme Court Must Overrule People V Flowers, 43 Loy. U. Chi. L.J. 727 (2012), Timothy P. O'Neill

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Law And The Argumentative Theory, 90 Or. L. Rev. 837 (2012), Timothy P. O'Neill Jan 2012

Law And The Argumentative Theory, 90 Or. L. Rev. 837 (2012), Timothy P. O'Neill

Faculty Scholarship

Like many law professors, I have coached my share of moot court teams. As you probably know, in most competitions students either choose or are assigned one side of the case to brief. But for the oral argument segment of the competition, students must argue both sides of the case, “on-brief” and “off-brief,” often in alternate rounds.

At the end of a competition, with their heads still swimming with arguments and counterarguments, students will sometimes ask, “OK, so can you tell us which is the correct side?” I always say, “Of course I can. . . . The correct side is always the ...


Free Speech For Judges And Due Process For Litigants: The Elimination Of First And Fourteenth Amendment Mutual Exclusivity In Siefert V. Alexander, 46 J. Marshall L. Rev. 333 (2012), Margaret Mares Jan 2012

Free Speech For Judges And Due Process For Litigants: The Elimination Of First And Fourteenth Amendment Mutual Exclusivity In Siefert V. Alexander, 46 J. Marshall L. Rev. 333 (2012), Margaret Mares

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Judges, Friends, And Facebook: The Ethics Of Prohibition, 24 Geo. J. Legal Ethics 281 (2011), Samuel Vincent Jones Jan 2011

Judges, Friends, And Facebook: The Ethics Of Prohibition, 24 Geo. J. Legal Ethics 281 (2011), Samuel Vincent Jones

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Freedom Of Information Act Trial, 61 Am. U. L. Rev. 217 (2011), Margaret B. Kwoka Jan 2011

The Freedom Of Information Act Trial, 61 Am. U. L. Rev. 217 (2011), Margaret B. Kwoka

Faculty Scholarship

This Article examines the paucity of Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) cases that go to trial and courts' preference for resolving these disputes at the summary judgment stage. Using traditional legal analysis and empirical evidence, this Article explores whether we should expect FOIA cases to go to trial and how the scarcity of FOIA trials compares to the trial rate in civil litigation generally. It concludes that the unusual use of summary judgment in FOIA cases has unjustifiably all but eliminated FOIA trials, which occur in less than 1 % of FOIA cases. It further examines how conducting FOIA trials in ...


What Do We Mean By An Independent Judiciary, 38 Ohio N.U. L. Rev. 133 (2011), Michael P. Seng Jan 2011

What Do We Mean By An Independent Judiciary, 38 Ohio N.U. L. Rev. 133 (2011), Michael P. Seng

Faculty Scholarship

Issues continue to arise about judicial independence in the United States. The term judicial independence is often not defined with precision. Judicial independence has its roots in the doctrine of separation of powers. It is also grounded in due process and in ethical standards that require judges to be competent and impartial decision-makers. Judicial independence depends upon society having faith in the integrity of the courts. Accountability is thus the handmaid of an independent judiciary. This article defines both the structures and the ethical standards that ensure an independent judiciary.


In His Own Words: The Career Of Chief Judge Paul Michel, 10 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 301 (2011), Gene Quinn Jan 2011

In His Own Words: The Career Of Chief Judge Paul Michel, 10 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 301 (2011), Gene Quinn

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


Comments On Paul R. Michel's Contributions To Justice, 10 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 279 (2011), James F. Holderman Jan 2011

Comments On Paul R. Michel's Contributions To Justice, 10 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 279 (2011), James F. Holderman

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


Chief Judge Michel's Current And Future Contributions To Improving U.S. Intellectual Property Rights, 10 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 299 (2011), Herbert C. Wamsley Jan 2011

Chief Judge Michel's Current And Future Contributions To Improving U.S. Intellectual Property Rights, 10 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 299 (2011), Herbert C. Wamsley

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


A Capitalist Joker: The Strange Origins, Disturbing Past, And Uncertain Future Of Corporate Personhood In American Law, 44 J. Marshall L. Rev. 643 (2011), David H. Gans, Douglas T. Kendall Jan 2011

A Capitalist Joker: The Strange Origins, Disturbing Past, And Uncertain Future Of Corporate Personhood In American Law, 44 J. Marshall L. Rev. 643 (2011), David H. Gans, Douglas T. Kendall

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Reshaping The Traditional Limits Of Affirmative Duties Under The Third Restatement Of Torts, 44 J. Marshall L. Rev. 319 (2011), Victor E. Schwartz, Christopher E. Appel Jan 2011

Reshaping The Traditional Limits Of Affirmative Duties Under The Third Restatement Of Torts, 44 J. Marshall L. Rev. 319 (2011), Victor E. Schwartz, Christopher E. Appel

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Law As Hidden Architecture: Law, Politics, And Implementation Of The Burnham Plan Of Chicago Since 1909, 43 J. Marshall L. Rev. 375 (2010), Richard J. Roddewig Jan 2010

Law As Hidden Architecture: Law, Politics, And Implementation Of The Burnham Plan Of Chicago Since 1909, 43 J. Marshall L. Rev. 375 (2010), Richard J. Roddewig

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


The International Criminal Court: From Rome To Kampala, 43 J. Marshall L. Rev. 515 (2010), Philippe Kirsch Jan 2010

The International Criminal Court: From Rome To Kampala, 43 J. Marshall L. Rev. 515 (2010), Philippe Kirsch

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Justice Sutherland Reconsidered, 62 Vand. L. Rev. 639 (2009), Samuel R. Olken Jan 2009

Justice Sutherland Reconsidered, 62 Vand. L. Rev. 639 (2009), Samuel R. Olken

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Role Of Juries In Managing Patent Enforcement: Judge Howard Markey's Opinions And Writings, 8 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. (Special Issue) 41 (2009), John R. Alison Jan 2009

The Role Of Juries In Managing Patent Enforcement: Judge Howard Markey's Opinions And Writings, 8 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. (Special Issue) 41 (2009), John R. Alison

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

In the 1970s, a trial by jury was rare in patent cases. By the time Chief Judge Markey left the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in 1989, jury trials had become the norm. Throughout Judge Markey’s time on the bench he exerted great energy to promote, define, and improve the role of law juries in patent cases. This speech by Judge Markey’s former law clerk, John R. Alison, discusses the three Markey Principles. The first principle of Judge Markey is the fundamental right to a jury trial in patent cases. Second, proceedings in jury ...


When Is Lying Illegal? When Should It Be? A Critical Analysis Of The Federal False Statements Act, 43 J. Marshall L. Rev. 111 (2009), Steven R. Morrison Jan 2009

When Is Lying Illegal? When Should It Be? A Critical Analysis Of The Federal False Statements Act, 43 J. Marshall L. Rev. 111 (2009), Steven R. Morrison

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Role Of The Office Of The Administrative Law Judges Within The United States International Trade Commission, 8 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 216 (2009), Carl C. Charneski Jan 2009

The Role Of The Office Of The Administrative Law Judges Within The United States International Trade Commission, 8 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 216 (2009), Carl C. Charneski

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930 makes unlawful, specifically, the importation of products that infringe intellectual property rights. The U.S. International Trade Commission (“ITC”) is the forum in which all section 337 proceedings are adjudicated and, within the ITC, the Office of Administrative Law Judges handles all these proceedings. Section 337 cases can be exceedingly complex and technical, and the Administrative Law Judges (“ALJ”) are the initial triers of fact, administrators, and decision makers in every case. Thus, the amount of work that the ALJs—along with their staff—must meet to see these cases to completion ...


The Legacy Of Judge Howard T. Markey, 8 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. (Special Issue) 1 (2009), Antonin Scalia Jan 2009

The Legacy Of Judge Howard T. Markey, 8 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. (Special Issue) 1 (2009), Antonin Scalia

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

On September 16, 2008, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States Antonin Scalia delivered a speech on the legacy of the late Howard T. Markey. The speech was given at The John Marshall Law School’s The Legacy of Judge Howard T. Markey Symposium, held at the law school in Chicago, Illinois. The text of the speech appears here.


Obviousness Before And After Judge Markey, 8 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. (Special Issue) 9 (2009), Mark J. Abate Jan 2009

Obviousness Before And After Judge Markey, 8 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. (Special Issue) 9 (2009), Mark J. Abate

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Chief Judge Howard T. Markey left an everlasting mark on the meaning of obviousness under 35 U.S.C. § 103. Chief Judge Markey viewed all inventions as combinations of old elements because, in his own words, “Only God works from nothing. Man must work with old elements.” Chief Judge Markey’s obviousness jurisprudence can be characterized by three fundamental principles. First, he looked at an invention as a whole. Second, he looked for real world evidence of nonobviousness because it was a reliable indicator of obviousness. Third, he avoided the dangers of hindsight bias by looking for a reason to ...