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Information literacy

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Volume 23 Issue 4 Introduction, Esther Moberg Apr 2018

Volume 23 Issue 4 Introduction, Esther Moberg

OLA Quarterly

Llamas, Adulting 101, Henna Art, Raptors, and Trivia. Most people in Oregon typically would not think of these words in connection with their local library. Yet, all of these are programs that have been served up in our local libraries just in the past year alone. With hundreds of programs covering even more diverse topics than these, perhaps the more typical things people think about when it comes to programs are an author talk, storytime, or book talk in the library. These are still staple library programs, but with this Oregon Library Association Quarterly issue we will be sharing some ...


Adulting 101: Know Your Audience, Teresa Lucas Apr 2018

Adulting 101: Know Your Audience, Teresa Lucas

OLA Quarterly

During the winter of 2017, I began to see a common topic on library programming group threads centering around ideas such as teaching basic life skills to young and new adults that may not have been taught at home or school. Around the same time, Clara Piazzola, the library’s young adult assistant, came to me to share an idea that was buzzing around her library school discussion boards. She told me about a program idea that would teach young people necessary skills to help them survive in the grownup world. Talk about a coincidence! I gave her the go ...


Pierce Library’S Night Against Procrastination, Sarah Ralston Apr 2018

Pierce Library’S Night Against Procrastination, Sarah Ralston

OLA Quarterly

There is a reason we are probably all familiar with the term “all-nighter,” whether we work in academia or elsewhere. The tendency to procrastinate is so common; most of us are likely to have had the experience of writing a paper late into the night before it is due or making a last-ditch attempt to learn concepts the night before a final exam. There are many strategies for dealing with, preventing, or avoiding procrastination, but a group of students and tutors at the European University Viadrina (EUV) in Frankfurt/Oder, Germany, came up with a novel twist on the traditional ...


Sushi, Stem, Or Goat Yoga: Successful Library Programming Apr 2018

Sushi, Stem, Or Goat Yoga: Successful Library Programming

OLA Quarterly

Llamas, Adulting 101, Henna Art, Raptors, and Trivia. Most people in Oregon typically would not think of these words in connection with their local library. Yet, all of these are programs that have been served up in our local libraries just in the past year alone. With hundreds of programs covering even more diverse topics than these, perhaps the more typical things people think about when it comes to programs are an author talk, storytime, or book talk in the library. These are still staple library programs, but with this Oregon Library Association Quarterly issue we will be sharing some ...


The Art Of The Trade: A New/Old Take On Resource Sharing, Ann Scheppke Apr 2018

The Art Of The Trade: A New/Old Take On Resource Sharing, Ann Scheppke

OLA Quarterly

The Salem Public Library had been awarded a grant from the American Library Association and FINRA, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority. The award included a six-week installation of a traveling exhibit called Thinking Money, designed to introduce basic concepts of financial literacy to teens, tweens, and young adults. The 50 libraries that received the Thinking Money grant were charged with partnering with community organizations to create at least four programs based on the exhibit’s theme.

Finding community partners was not at all difficult. Credit unions and financial planners were only too happy to conduct classes and give presentations, but ...


Building Community At The Library With Coffee And Conversation, Amy Honisett, Rachael Short, Kate Schwab Apr 2018

Building Community At The Library With Coffee And Conversation, Amy Honisett, Rachael Short, Kate Schwab

OLA Quarterly

As communities and individuals struggle with houselessness and housing insecurity, library staff must adapt in order to help our patrons fulfill needs. In 2013, Multnomah County Library (MCL) and the Multnomah County Department of County Human Services surveyed library patrons about library use. The survey identified that about 18.6 percent of visitors to Central Library—the county system’s main branch, located in downtown Portland— are people experiencing houselessness. These patrons visit the library more frequently than patrons who are not experiencing houselessness, and they tend to stay at the library longer than the latter group.

Because patrons experiencing ...


Library Takeovers: After Hours Nerf Games And More At The Corvallis-Benton County Public Library, Bonnie Brzozowski, Elizabeth Johnson, Kristy Kemper Hodge Apr 2018

Library Takeovers: After Hours Nerf Games And More At The Corvallis-Benton County Public Library, Bonnie Brzozowski, Elizabeth Johnson, Kristy Kemper Hodge

OLA Quarterly

The Corvallis-Benton County Public Library (CBCPL) has been hosting action-packed after-hours events for all ages since July 2017. Referred to as Takeovers, these events involve crafts, video games, Nerf games, and more—all while the library is closed. Each Takeover event is tailored to a specific age group (either tweens, teens, or adults) and people from outside that age group are not permitted in the library during the event. Takeovers are all about having fun and connecting with others and have proven to be incredibly popular; for example, registration and attendance caps are necessary for the Tween Takeovers to be ...


The Alvin M. And Betty Josephy Library Of Western History And Culture, Rich Wandschneider Feb 2018

The Alvin M. And Betty Josephy Library Of Western History And Culture, Rich Wandschneider

OLA Quarterly

Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce died in exile on the Colville Indian Reservation in Washington State in 1904, after being rebuffed on two trips to Wallowa County, Oregon, to convince the local citizenry to allow him to buy land. He asked to be allowed to live out his days in the “land of winding waters” that held the bones of his father and his people. Denied, he lived out his days on the Colville, befriended by University of Washington professor Edmond Meany, and famously photographed by Meany’s friend, Edward Sheriff Curtis. A few short years after that Wallowa ...


Volume 23 Issue 3 Introduction, Buzzy Nielsen Feb 2018

Volume 23 Issue 3 Introduction, Buzzy Nielsen

OLA Quarterly

The Oregon library community consistently amazes me with its innovative, enterprising, and patron-focused activities. Indeed, we hear about these many activities through Libs-Or, OLA conferences, and this journal. While certainly not by design, many of the voices we hear come from libraries along the I-5 corridor. Cool things happen in those libraries, of course, but this issue of the OLA Quarterly amplifies voices we hear less frequently: the rural institutions that constitute the majority of the libraries in Oregon.

I have spent most of my career working in small and rural libraries. My first library job was at my hometown ...


Community Needs-Based Planning For Rural Library Success, Jeremy Skinner Feb 2018

Community Needs-Based Planning For Rural Library Success, Jeremy Skinner

OLA Quarterly

I am a librarian from rural southern Oregon, and my community is a stereotype. NPR correspondent Jeff Brady visited our town during the summer of 2017 for a story highlighting rural communities in decline (Brady, 2017). We were a convenient case study. Our natural resource industry has been dying a slow and loud death for decades, our voters have notoriously voted down numerous tax levies, and Jeff Brady just happened to grow up here. Brady being a national business correspondent from Philadelphia, we were the perfect stereotype for a piece that closed with his grim statement: “Overall, the economic prospects ...


Stories Of Southern Oregon = Communities + Libraries + Museums + University, Maureen F. Battistella, Charlene Prinsen, Thalia Truesdell Feb 2018

Stories Of Southern Oregon = Communities + Libraries + Museums + University, Maureen F. Battistella, Charlene Prinsen, Thalia Truesdell

OLA Quarterly

Collaborations often have the best outcomes because conversations among those with diverse experiences, varied institutional affiliations, and cross-discipline training bring breadth and depth of perspective. The Stories of Southern Oregon project was a good example of how libraries, museums, and academics can work together to surface important historical content, build community, and strengthen relationships. Thanks to a 2017 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Common Heritage program, Southern Oregon University faculty partnered with the Eagle Point and Ruch branches of the Jackson County Library District and local museums to collect stories and images of heritage work-life like logging ...


Oregon’S County Law Libraries: Providing Legal Information And Reference Assistance Across The Miles, Sue Ludington Feb 2018

Oregon’S County Law Libraries: Providing Legal Information And Reference Assistance Across The Miles, Sue Ludington

OLA Quarterly

In Oregon, all 36 counties are statutorily required to “operate a free law library that is convenient and available at reasonable hours; or provide free law library services at one or more locations that are convenient and available at reasonable hours” (Or. Rev. Stat. § 9.815). County law libraries have been around for more than a century in Oregon; however, what those libraries look like today and the depth of services or resources they offer vary dramatically statewide. In rural and small counties, especially, there may be limited (or nonexistent) resources, physical space, and staffing. Despite the challenges, many counties ...


Ready2learn Five Years Later, Jennifer Costley Feb 2018

Ready2learn Five Years Later, Jennifer Costley

OLA Quarterly

In July of 2013, the first Ready2Learn library card was issued in Eastern Oregon. At the time, Project Ready2Learn had the support of the Library Services and Technology Act, Governor Kitzhaber, Oregon College Savings Plan (OCSP), Greater Oregon Behavioral Health Inc. (GOBHI) and a committed team of librarians ready to prove that frequent library use is directly connected to success in school. Fast forward to today and what you have left is GOBHI, the librarians, and some pretty compelling evidence that what we are doing is working.

On paper, the purpose of Ready2Learn was to increase kindergarten readiness. However, the ...


Sharing For The Greater Good: A High School And Community College Partnership To Cultivate Information Literacy In A Rural Community, Jacquelyn Ray, Delia Fields Feb 2018

Sharing For The Greater Good: A High School And Community College Partnership To Cultivate Information Literacy In A Rural Community, Jacquelyn Ray, Delia Fields

OLA Quarterly

“Mind the gap” is a phrase heard umpteen times when riding the London Underground subway system. That same advice was heeded in eastern Oregon, where it prompted an Information Literacy (IL) collaboration project between a high school and a community college librarian who forged a “dynamic duo” in an attempt to bridge noticeable gaps in the information literacy skills of their students.

Students in both high school and college struggle with aspects of information literacy. These knowledge and habit “gaps” are wide ranging—from initial question asking, to entering the scholarly conversation and finding their voice, to evaluating the myriad ...


Agriculture And Art Meet At The Library, Brian Vegter Feb 2018

Agriculture And Art Meet At The Library, Brian Vegter

OLA Quarterly

In July 2015, I was approached by Perry Stokes, Director of Baker County Library District and President of Libraries of Eastern Oregon (LEO), about an arts program that was being funded through ArtPlace America. If you didn’t know, LEO is the nation’s largest geographic library consortium, and we seek to enhance civic engagement, social capital, and the personal development of individuals. Fifteen counties and more than 50 public libraries in Oregon make up LEO, from Hood River to Ontario, Baker City to Lakeview, and just about everywhere in between, with a few exceptions in Central Oregon. The idea ...


Book Review: Information Literacy In The Workplace, Lore Guilmartin Jan 2018

Book Review: Information Literacy In The Workplace, Lore Guilmartin

Communications in Information Literacy

No abstract provided.


Re-Imagining The One-Shot: The Case For Transformational Teaching, Cinthya Ippoliti Jan 2018

Re-Imagining The One-Shot: The Case For Transformational Teaching, Cinthya Ippoliti

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, Innovative Pedagogy

Coined by Jack Mezirow, and translated for classroom application by George Slavich and Philip Zimbardo (2012), transformational teaching seeks to increase student “mastery of key course concepts while transforming their learning-related attitudes, values, beliefs, and skills”. The Framework for Information Literacy has caused a widespread shift in how we approach instruction in librarianship as students explore newfound roles as information creators, disseminators, and evaluators. But this is only one of many stops along a journey of self-realization and discovery that they make throughout the duration of a course. Information literacy and transformational teaching share parallel goals and pedagogical methodologies which ...


Letting Our Values And History Guide Us: Inspiration For Libraries From Myles Horton, Annie Downey Oct 2017

Letting Our Values And History Guide Us: Inspiration For Libraries From Myles Horton, Annie Downey

OLA Quarterly

In the aftermath of the horrifying racist marches, violence, and murder at the University of Virginia at Charlottesville in August 2017, people across the country have looked to history and shared values to help them clear their heads and find ways to move America forward. In explaining his decision to take down a statue of Robert E. Lee from Duke University’s campus, president Vincent E. Price argued that removing the statue was a way to express Duke’s institutional values, including a “commitment to justice, not discrimination; to civil protest, not violence; to authentic dialogue, not rhetoric; and to ...


Volume 23 Issue 2 Introduction, Elsa Loftis Oct 2017

Volume 23 Issue 2 Introduction, Elsa Loftis

OLA Quarterly

Libraries and archives are community spaces that acquire, organize, preserve, and make available resources for our patrons. Library workers connect people to these resources in various ways (technical services, reference, instruction, and more). It is noble and wonderful work, and it begs some interesting questions: is acquisition, organization, preservation, or dissemination a series of passive acts? Are libraries impartial spaces that give the real estate on their shelves to the words and ideas of others without judgment or context?

So, what does critical librarianship mean, exactly, and how is it practiced? To think about this, we look at librarianship through ...


But How Do We Do Critical Librarianship?, Kelly Mcelroy Oct 2017

But How Do We Do Critical Librarianship?, Kelly Mcelroy

OLA Quarterly

Critical librarianship asks us to look more closely at the sociopolitical world both inside and out of our libraries. Indeed, a lot has happened in the world since I first saw the call for this special issue of OLA Quarterly. First, there was the exposure of an internal memo from a Google employee that denied that women were capable tech workers. Last week, there were escalating threats between Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un about possible nuclear detonations. I finished writing in the wake of white supremacist demonstrations and violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, and as an unprecedented storm geared up ...


Critical Library Management: Administrating For Equity, Candise Branum, Turner Masland Oct 2017

Critical Library Management: Administrating For Equity, Candise Branum, Turner Masland

OLA Quarterly

Social justice and critical theory frameworks have been utilized to discuss library pedagogy and cataloging, but librarians have been slow in applying critical theory to how we actually manage libraries and lead staff. Management is not glamorous; rather, many still hold the traditional view of management as upholding hierarchical values. At its core, both libraries and management are about people, and library managers and administrators have the power to formulate and uphold the library’s values.

Libraries do not exist in a vacuum; we work to empower the communities we work with, and social justice issues directly impact our patrons ...


Critical Librarianship Oct 2017

Critical Librarianship

OLA Quarterly

Libraries and archives are community spaces that acquire, organize, preserve, and make available resources for our patrons. Library workers connect people to these resources in various ways (technical services, reference, instruction, and more). It is noble and wonderful work, and it begs some interesting questions: is acquisition, organization, preservation, or dissemination a series of passive acts? Are libraries impartial spaces that give the real estate on their shelves to the words and ideas of others without judgment or context?

Libraries and archives are community spaces that acquire, organize, preserve, and make available resources for our patrons. Library workers connect people ...


Working Class In The Library, Robert Schroeder Oct 2017

Working Class In The Library, Robert Schroeder

OLA Quarterly

Portland State University is an urban, access university. This means that students don’t face nearly as many academic barriers, such as entrance exams, in order to attend PSU as opposed to other colleges. Nevertheless, students do encounter many hidden barriers that affect their chances of getting into, staying at, and graduating from PSU—barriers associated with race, gender, citizenship, abilities, and the topic of this article—socioeconomic status. We need to acknowledge that all of these characteristics intersect and play out differently, so it’s hard to look at just one of these characteristics at a time. “Working class ...


Storytime Can Be Social Justice Time, Natasha F. Campbell Oct 2017

Storytime Can Be Social Justice Time, Natasha F. Campbell

OLA Quarterly

Library storytimes are resources through which children can learn literacy skills, but they also have the potential for even greater impact. Families also use storytimes to gain valuable social interactions.

Libraries currently offer storytimes in response to community needs and values, and looking at storytime through a social justice lens gives library staff an opportunity to share and model valuable lessons in acceptance, inclusion, kindness, and empathy.

Resources exist to help storytime providers re-evaluate their storytimes and make incremental changes that can reap big benefits for attendees.


Critically Interrogating Oregon History In The Archives: Spanish Heritage Learners In The Pcun Records, David Woken Oct 2017

Critically Interrogating Oregon History In The Archives: Spanish Heritage Learners In The Pcun Records, David Woken

OLA Quarterly

Critical librarianship has emerged over the past decade or so as one of the main thrusts of the library profession’s longstanding commitment to social justice. Growing from the application of insights from critical theory to libraries as an institution, the critical librarianship movement explores how hierarchies of power, particularly those around race, gender, sexuality, and class, shape our work, and how we can challenge our profession’s complicity in those hierarchies. Critical librarianship’s insights have been applied perhaps most thoroughly in the areas of cataloging and classification and, especially, information literacy instruction (Garcia, 2015). Critical information literacy instruction ...


Communicating Science For Everyday Use, Jason Hackett Oct 2017

Communicating Science For Everyday Use, Jason Hackett

Seek

For decades, farmers and ranchers learned best practices and better ways to raise their crops and livestock through printed publications and in-person gatherings called field days. Both methods were spearheaded by scientific experts from the university and delivered by extension agents. They were — and are — efficient and successful means of sharing knowledge. Whatever their individual choices, person-to-person contact remains at the center of their communication. The difference is in the delivery.


Fake News And Information Literacy: Creating Resources To Develop Source Evaluation Skills At The University Of Oregon Libraries, Carolina Hernandez Aug 2017

Fake News And Information Literacy: Creating Resources To Develop Source Evaluation Skills At The University Of Oregon Libraries, Carolina Hernandez

OLA Quarterly

In the months following the 2016 presidential election, much discussion has occurred regarding the proliferation of “fake news” and what impact it may have had on the election results. Regardless of whether there was an actual increase in fake news in the last year, it is certainly true that interest in the topic has increased dramatically. Interest appeared to peak in January, according to Google Trends (Google Trends, n.d.). Widespread concern over how to prevent the spread of this problem has lead to possible solutions cropping up often.

Though often excluded from these recommendations, libraries have the opportunity to ...


Guns And America And The Library And Us: What We Learned From The Worst Library Program … Ever!, Barratt Miller, Jane Scheppke Aug 2017

Guns And America And The Library And Us: What We Learned From The Worst Library Program … Ever!, Barratt Miller, Jane Scheppke

OLA Quarterly

On a dark and stormy night in Prineville, fifty members of the community gathered in Crook County Library’s meeting room. The program facilitator walked in the door five minutes before go-time. The Assistant Director introduced him to the room. And then all hell broke loose. The program topic? Guns and America.

Guns and America was offered as part of the Conversation Project series of community discussion programs given by Oregon Humanities. Conversation Project programs are intended to be open-ended discussions run by a trained facilitator who is an expert in the topic at hand. The facilitator creates a neutral ...


Ola Today: Oregon Librarians Respond To Changing Times Aug 2017

Ola Today: Oregon Librarians Respond To Changing Times

OLA Quarterly

This issue’s contributors and topics span academic and public institutions, rural and metropolitan libraries, political activism and personal narrative, and programming as well as abstraction. Considering instances of political action and librarianship, Oregon Library Association President Elsa Loftis begins this issue by profiling the organization. She cites its Legislative Agenda and its advocacy body, the Library Development and Legislation Committee, offering resources and steps toward political action that align with such guiding principles as Intellectual Freedom, Equitable Access, and Stewardship of Public Resources. Donna L. Cohen details a series of civic education workshops she has offered in recent months ...


Volume 23 Issue 1 Introduction, Lynne Stahl Aug 2017

Volume 23 Issue 1 Introduction, Lynne Stahl

OLA Quarterly

I feel honored and fortunate to have been asked to introduce this issue of the OLA Quarterly, and, having lived in Oregon for less than two years, not a little daunted in light of my relative newness to the state. Neither a longtime Oregonian nor even yet a fully credentialed librarian, I am hardly the fittest person imaginable to introduce a journal issue focused on Oregon librarians’ response to broad and dramatic changes. And yet, in the same way that one can benefit greatly from the distanced perspective of a different set of eyes looking over a draft of writing ...