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Full-Text Articles in Labor Relations

Boom & Bust: The Perils Of Guaranteed Long Term Contracts. Evidence From Ops100 Performance Over The Contract Cycle, Heather M. O'Neill Jul 2015

Boom & Bust: The Perils Of Guaranteed Long Term Contracts. Evidence From Ops100 Performance Over The Contract Cycle, Heather M. O'Neill

Business and Economics Faculty Publications

This study focuses on panel data of 256 MLB free agent hitters under the 2006-2011 Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) to demonstrate that hitters, on average, increase their offensive production, measured by OPS100, during the last year of their contract and subsequently underperform the first year of the newly signed long term contract. The contract year phenomenon arises from the incentive to land a lucrative guaranteed contract for players not intending to retire. Signing a long term guaranteed contract creates an incentive to shirk (underperform) the first year of the new contract because performance and pay become unlinked and the need ...


Do Mlb Hitters Boost Performance In Their Contract Year?, Heather M. O'Neill Aug 2013

Do Mlb Hitters Boost Performance In Their Contract Year?, Heather M. O'Neill

Business and Economics Faculty Publications

This study focuses on 256 MLB free agent hitters playing under the 2006-2011 CBA to determine whether they boost their offensive performance in their contract year. Prior studies’ results are mixed, depending on the econometric technique used and the choice of the offensive performance measure.

Having multiple year observations per player, one can incorporate the unobserved traits of the players (ability, risk aversion, work ethic, etc.) by using Fixed Effects (FE) estimation. Since these unmeasured player traits are likely to be correlated with observed predictors of performance (games played, playoff contention, age, etc.), traditionally used Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) and ...


From Brawn To Brains: How Immigration Works For America, Pia Orrenius Apr 2011

From Brawn To Brains: How Immigration Works For America, Pia Orrenius

Western Migration Conference Series

Bio:

Pia Orrenius is Research Officer and Senior Economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas and Adjunct Professor at the Hankamer School of Business, Baylor University. Her research focuses on the labor market impacts of immigration, unauthorized immigration, and U.S. immigration policy, and her work has been published in the American Economic Review, Journal of Development Economics, Labour Economics, Industrial and Labor Relations Review, among others. She is coauthor of the book Beside the Golden Door: U.S. Immigration Reform in a New Era of Globalization (2010, AEI Press). Dr. Orrenius is a Research Fellow at The Tower ...


The Labor Market Effects Of U.S. Immigration: What Is The Latest Evidence?, Orn Bodvarsson Apr 2011

The Labor Market Effects Of U.S. Immigration: What Is The Latest Evidence?, Orn Bodvarsson

Western Migration Conference Series

Bio:

Örn Bodvarsson is Professor of Economics, Chair of the Department of Management, and Interim Chair of the Department of Social Work at St. Cloud State University. He is also a Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in Bonn, Germany. A labor economist, Bodvarsson has been working in the immigration field since 2001, focusing on host country distributional effects of immigration, determinants of migration, internal migration in China, and wage discrimination against the foreign-born. In 2009 Springer published his co-authored book, The Economics of Immigration: Theory and Policy, recently reviewed in Journal of Economic Literature.


Why Macro Labor Supply Is More Elastic Than Micro: Theory And Policy Implications, Riccardo Fiorito Apr 2008

Why Macro Labor Supply Is More Elastic Than Micro: Theory And Policy Implications, Riccardo Fiorito

riccardo fiorito

Micro and Macro estimates of labor supply don't have to be the same since they refer to different variables. This is shown using the same PSID data for the micro and the macro estimate. The macro elasticity is widely bigger than the micro elasticity as it is assumed by Prescott (1986) when calibrating the RBC model.