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Labor Relations Commons

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Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Labor Relations

Union Administrative Practices: A Comparative Analysis, Paul F. Clark, Kay Gilbert, Lois Spier Gray, Norman Solomon Dec 1998

Union Administrative Practices: A Comparative Analysis, Paul F. Clark, Kay Gilbert, Lois Spier Gray, Norman Solomon

Articles and Chapters

In response to growing challenges, many labor organizations are reevaluating themselves in an effort to become more efficient and effective. Their efforts, however, are limited by their frames of reference. Seldom do unions compare practices across labor movements. To expand these frames of reference we compare union administrative practices in three countries: Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Two specific areas of union administration are examined — human resource/personnel practices and strategic planning. Results from these countries are presented and analyzed to identify and explain similarities and differences.


Do Economics Departments With Lower Tenure Probabilities Pay Higher Faculty Salaries?, Ronald G. Ehrenberg, Paul J. Pieper, Rachel A. Willis Nov 1998

Do Economics Departments With Lower Tenure Probabilities Pay Higher Faculty Salaries?, Ronald G. Ehrenberg, Paul J. Pieper, Rachel A. Willis

Articles and Chapters

The simplest competitive labor market model asserts that if tenure is a desirable job characteristic for professors, they should be willing to pay for it by accepting lower salaries. Conversely, if an institution unilaterally reduces the probability that its assistant professors receive tenure, it will have to pay higher salaries to attract new faculty. Our paper tests this theory using data on salary offers accepted by new assistant professors at economics departments in the United States during the 1974-75 to 1980-81 period, along with data on the proportion of new Ph.D.s hired by each department between 1970 and ...


[Review Of The Book We Can’T Eat Prestige: The Women Who Organized Harvard], Richard W. Hurd Jul 1998

[Review Of The Book We Can’T Eat Prestige: The Women Who Organized Harvard], Richard W. Hurd

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] In 1988 the fifteen-year campaign to organize office and laboratory workers at Harvard University ended with an NLRB election win. We Can't Eat Prestige is the most comprehensive examination to date of this compelling story, offering new detail and sufficiently bold assertions to re-ignite a smoldering debate about what this victory means for the future of unions. The author is a highly regarded journalist with thirty years of experience reporting on labor issues. Predictably, the book is extraordinarily well written, weaving a fascinating story of the union's evolution.


The Effect Of Curriculum-Based External Exit Exam Systems On Student Achievement, John H. Bishop Mar 1998

The Effect Of Curriculum-Based External Exit Exam Systems On Student Achievement, John H. Bishop

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Two presidents, the National Governors Association, and numerous blue-ribbon panels have called for the development of state or national content standards for core subjects and examinations that assess student achievement of these standards. The Competitiveness Policy Council, for example, advocated that "external assessments be given to individual students at the secondary level and that the results should be a major but not exclusive factor qualifying for college and better jobs at better wages." It is claimed that curriculum-based external exit exam systems (CBEEESs) based on explicit content standards will improve the teaching and learning of core subjects. What evidence ...


Discrimination By Gender And Disability Status: Do Worker Perceptions Match Statistical Measures?, Kevin F. Hallock, Wallace Hendricks, Emer Broadbent Jan 1998

Discrimination By Gender And Disability Status: Do Worker Perceptions Match Statistical Measures?, Kevin F. Hallock, Wallace Hendricks, Emer Broadbent

Articles and Chapters

We explore whether perceptions of discrimination are related to ordinary statistical measures. The majority of disabled respondents report feeling some discrimination due to their disability, the majority of women feel some discrimination because of their gender, and a surprising number of men also report some discrimination. We do not find a strong link between perceptions of discrimination and measured discrimination perhaps because those who perceive discrimination feel that it occurs along other dimensions than pay. However, we do find a connection between whether a person feels his or her income is inadequate and measured discrimination for all groups studied.


Personnel And Human Resource Management, Lee Dyer, Walton E. Burdick Jan 1998

Personnel And Human Resource Management, Lee Dyer, Walton E. Burdick

Articles and Chapters

The basic endeavor of this discipline has not changed over the years: it has sought “to contribute to organizational success by assuring that the right numbers of the right people are in the right places at the right times doing the right things in the right ways.”


Introduction To Industrial Relations At The Dawn Of The New Millenium, Maurice F. Neufeld Jan 1998

Introduction To Industrial Relations At The Dawn Of The New Millenium, Maurice F. Neufeld

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] The essays assembled in the volume focus upn the state of the art of industrial relations at the dawn of the new millennium. The authors of these essays are members of the faculty of the School of Industrial and Labor Relations at Cornell University, or were formerly closely associated with the school. They have found, to their delight, that in creating the essays presented here, they released an enchantment of scholarly memory that illuminates the past and present states of the scholarly disciplines they cultivate and encourages speculation about the future of these disciplines.


Labor Market Outcomes Of Deregulation In Telecommunications Services, Rosemary Batt, Michael Strausser Jan 1998

Labor Market Outcomes Of Deregulation In Telecommunications Services, Rosemary Batt, Michael Strausser

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] This paper examines the labor market outcomes of deregulation in the telecommunications industry, focusing specifically on changes in union density, real wages, wage inequality, and employment levels. Deregulation of telecommunications long distance and equipment markets began in 1984 with the dismantling of the highly unionized Bell System into AT&T (the long distance and equipment provider) and seven Regional Bell Operating Companies (RBOCs, the local service providers). Deregulation of local service has proceeded fitfully: while Congress intended to increase local competition with the passage of the 1996 Telecommunications Act, the RBOCs continue largely as monopoly providers. Despite only partial deregulation, however, former Bell System companies have fundamentally restructured their operations to compete with a growing number of new nonunion entrants; and they have focused heavily on cutting labor costs. Labor-management relations, cooperative under the prior regulated regime, have deteriorated substantially; and unions have had minimal influence on managerial strategies in the deregulated era (Keefe and Batt 1997).

In this paper, we focus on three questions. First, what are the overall ...


Union-Management Cooperation, William Foote Whyte, Jennie Farley Jan 1998

Union-Management Cooperation, William Foote Whyte, Jennie Farley

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] As unions and management work together on cooperative programs, this cooperation not only reduces the emotional heat in their collective bargaining; it encourages them to experiment with new ways of resolving problems.