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Full-Text Articles in History

International Terrorism And Television Channels:Operation And Regulation Of Tv News Channel During Coverage Of Terrorism, Ratnesh Dwivedi Mr Dec 2012

International Terrorism And Television Channels:Operation And Regulation Of Tv News Channel During Coverage Of Terrorism, Ratnesh Dwivedi Mr

Ratnesh Dwivedi

The concept of globalization or internationalization of certain wars, which were result of terrorist activities worldwide , as well as the high attention of terrorism coverage broadcast worldwide might open up better opportunities to journalists – particularly to those who work in democratic countries like U.S.A and India – to improve their coverage. The context is the key: the context of the operation methodology, follow of guidelines of regulatory bodies,and of the journalistic culture and of the global environment. It is very important how media presents consequences of terrorist acts, how information is transmitted to public. Television and press have ...


Slavery And The Evangelical Enlightenment From "Religion And The Antebellum Debate Over Slavery (Univ. Of Georgia Press)", Robert P. Forbes Dec 2012

Slavery And The Evangelical Enlightenment From "Religion And The Antebellum Debate Over Slavery (Univ. Of Georgia Press)", Robert P. Forbes

Robert P Forbes

This essay shows how Scottish Common-Sense rationalism and evangelical religion conjoined in the later eighteenth century to create a powerful, mutually-reinforcing “Evangelical Enlightenment” with powerful antislavery implications. The defeat of Napoleon in 1815 cleared the way for an unprecedented wave of socially-progressive, religiously-undergirded American nationalism. This threat stimulated slaveholders and their allies to defend the institution through strategies designed to preclude the alliance of a powerful national state with the sanction of religion—the only combination powerful enough to overthrow slavery in a free republic.


Table Annexed To Article: Hamilton And Madison Deploy ‘Constitution’ Surveyed By Percent Of Words In Source, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Nov 2012

Table Annexed To Article: Hamilton And Madison Deploy ‘Constitution’ Surveyed By Percent Of Words In Source, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

In the last of three articles, OCL surveys the deployment of ‘constitution’ through The Federalist Papers, the bank bill debates and the remainder of Madison’s life (post-presidency). Numeric values for hits are computed for the range of semantic values, with the focus being constitution = text (locatable in only one place) competing with constitution = government. A net score is proposed which measures the effort an author has expended to ‘cleanse’ his semantic palette by employing one semantic value over a competing value.


Freedom Of Media In India: A Weapon To Kill Enemies Or Protection Guard For Public-The Two Sides, Ratnesh Dwivedi Mr Nov 2012

Freedom Of Media In India: A Weapon To Kill Enemies Or Protection Guard For Public-The Two Sides, Ratnesh Dwivedi Mr

Ratnesh Dwivedi

"The press [is] the only tocsin of a nation. [When it] is completely silenced... all means of a general effort [are] taken away." --Thomas Jefferson "Right to Freedom of Speech and Expression" is a fundamental right of the citizens of India. This is mentioned in Part III of the Constitution of India - Article 19(1). This Article is so wide in scope that Freedom of the Press is included in Freedom of Speech and Expression. It includes the right of free propagation and free circulation without any previous restraint on publication. The freedom of speech and expression does not give ...


The Insanity Defense: Guilty By Reason Of Hinckley?, Bruce Berner Nov 2012

The Insanity Defense: Guilty By Reason Of Hinckley?, Bruce Berner

Bruce G. Berner

No abstract provided.


What Are America’S Obligations To Iraq After An Unjust War?, Brian Stiltner Nov 2012

What Are America’S Obligations To Iraq After An Unjust War?, Brian Stiltner

Brian Stiltner

Since the goal of a just war is to restore a political condition of peace and justice, and since allowing a just war is always a mournful concession to the reality of injustice, a country that wins a war has post-bellum obligations to advance the common good within the losing nation and among the community of nations. It has the moral duty to make up for the damage it has caused, even if it was justified in causing that damage. (Note that the idea of a "just" war is not that war is a good in itself, but that it ...


Tea With The Chief: Ocl Interviews Chief Justice Rehnquist, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Oct 2012

Tea With The Chief: Ocl Interviews Chief Justice Rehnquist, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Annexed to the room in which the justices conference after oral argument, a chamber offers gilt-on-marble in fashion art deco: Rockefeller Center, the steamship Normandie, architectural tastes of futurismo dimension. In short, full on 1930s and architect Cass Gilbert letting his imagination take wing. This interview (re)launched OCL’s career as constitutional historian, following on two years’ study of the Nicomachean Ethics and the Politics. This is one of the few interviews not recorded on audiotape. Other interviewees include Michael Foote, J.O. Urmson, and Benson Mates. The interview (in context) continues in the next article. A longer recollection ...


How Bad Were The Official Records Of The Federal Convention?, Mary Sarah Bilder Oct 2012

How Bad Were The Official Records Of The Federal Convention?, Mary Sarah Bilder

Mary Sarah Bilder

The official records of the Constitutional Convention of 1787 have been neglected and dismissed by scholars for the last century, largely to due to Max Farrand’s criticisms of both the records and the man responsible for keeping them - Secretary of the Convention William Jackson. This Article disagrees with Farrand’s conclusion that the Convention records were bad, and aims to resurrect the records and Jackson’s reputation. The Article suggests that the endurance of Farrand’s critique arises in part from misinterpretations of certain procedural components of the Convention and failure to appreciate the significance of others, understandable considering ...


Agent Orange: History, Science, And The Politics Of Uncertainty, Edwin A. Martini Sep 2012

Agent Orange: History, Science, And The Politics Of Uncertainty, Edwin A. Martini

Edwin A. Martini

Taking on what one former U.S. ambassador called “the last ghost of the Vietnam War,” this book examines the far-reaching impact of Agent Orange, the most infamous of the dioxin-contaminated herbicides used by American forces in Southeast Asia. Edwin A. Martini’s aim is not simply to reconstruct the history of the “chemical war” but to investigate the ongoing controversy over the short- and long-term effects of weaponized defoliants on the environment of Vietnam, on the civilian population, and on the troops who fought on both sides.

Beginning in the early 1960s, when Agent Orange was first deployed in ...


A. Philip Randolph And Boston's African-American Railroad Worker, James R. Green, Robert C. Hayden Sep 2012

A. Philip Randolph And Boston's African-American Railroad Worker, James R. Green, Robert C. Hayden

James R. Green

On October 8, 1988, a group of retired Pullman car porters and dining car waiters gathered in Boston's Back Bay Station for the unveiling of a larger-than-life statue of A. Philip Randolph. During the 1920s and 1930s, Randolph was a pioneering black labor leader who led the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters. He came to be considered the "father of the modern civil rights movement" as a result of his efforts to desegregate World War II defense jobs and the military services. Randolph's importance as a militant leader is highlighted by a quote inscribed on the base of ...


Marshall University Chronology, Lisle G. Brown, Cora P. Teel Sep 2012

Marshall University Chronology, Lisle G. Brown, Cora P. Teel

Cora P. Teel

A year-by-year listing of selected important events, from the founding of Marshall University in 1837 to the present. This was developed as part of the University's 175th anniversary.


Guide To Rhode Island 11th United States Heavy Artillery (Colored) [Collection] 1853-1913, Russell M. Franks Sep 2012

Guide To Rhode Island 11th United States Heavy Artillery (Colored) [Collection] 1853-1913, Russell M. Franks

Russell M. Franks

A Finding Aid describing the content of the Rhode Island United States Heavy Artillery (Colored) 11th Regiment collection, which consists of official records of the Rhode Island 11th United States Heavy Artillery (Colored) and the personal correspondence of Lt. Allen F. Cameron, who was one of the regiment's officers. The regimental records consist of materials such as regimental reports, orders, rosters, and courts-martial records detailing activities of the regiment, life in the Union Army and treatment of black troops by white officers.


Guide To The William E. Walsh Civil War Diary Collection 1861-1865, Russell M. Franks Sep 2012

Guide To The William E. Walsh Civil War Diary Collection 1861-1865, Russell M. Franks

Russell M. Franks

A guide to the Guide to the William E. Walsh Civil War Diary Collection, which contains an account of William E. Walsh’s experiences as a trooper in the 1st Regiment, Rhode Island Cavalry during the American Civil War of 1861-1865. The account comments on the conditions of daily army life and the tragedy of the Civil War. In addition, a copy of Walsh's enlistment papers and a statement of his military service is included in the collection.


Nauvoo's Temple Square, Lisle G. Brown Sep 2012

Nauvoo's Temple Square, Lisle G. Brown

Lisle G Brown

In 1846 the Mormons abandoned Nauvoo, Illinois, and made their west to Utah. Among the many buildings left behind was the Nauvoo Temple. The temple, which was considered sacred space, was destroyed by arson and tornado, so that nothing of the original survived. This paper examines the history of the fifteen decades of the property after the Mormons left. During this time the lot served as profane space--a site for private residences; various business ventures, including a service station, saloons and a theater; a number of religious buildings; as well as a lighted baseball diamond. Beginning in the 1930s the ...


"Temple Pro Tempore": The Salt Lake City Endowment House, Lisle G. Brown Sep 2012

"Temple Pro Tempore": The Salt Lake City Endowment House, Lisle G. Brown

Lisle G Brown

The Salt Lake City Endowment House, built of adobe, was located on Temple Square in Salt Lake City, Utah. It served as a temporary temple during the construction of the Salt Lake Temple. It was completed in 1855 and razed in 1889. Using original floor plans, photographs, maps, and descriptions by persons who participated in its sacretodal activities, the author recreates its exterior and interior appearance. Floor plans and elevations of the building, prepared especially for the paper, are also included. The events leading to is destruction are chronicled. Finally, the author discusses the building’s influence on subsequent Mormon ...


“The Idea Of Freedom Might Be Too Great A Temptation For Them To Resist", Peter J. Aschenbrenner Aug 2012

“The Idea Of Freedom Might Be Too Great A Temptation For Them To Resist", Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

In Dred Scott v. Sandford, 60 U.S. 393 (1857), the Supreme Court passed up a chance to thread George Washington’s experience in transporting household staff across state lines; Washington obeyed Pennsylvania’s predicate: that a human being held to slavery in one state became free after six months in Pennsylvania. Since the features of this species of mobilia varied with the jurisdiction, the Supreme Court should have taken this landscape into account. George Washington did not import, with his household workers, ‘rules and understandings’ from Virginia.


Table Annexed To Article: Wrongfully ‘Established And Maintained’: A Census Of Congress’S Sins Against Geography, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Aug 2012

Table Annexed To Article: Wrongfully ‘Established And Maintained’: A Census Of Congress’S Sins Against Geography, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Taney, C.J. opined, for a majority of the Supreme Court, that Congress lacked the power to establish and maintain colonies as a system by which nascent states were groomed by Congress to join an expanding union. Dred Scott v. Sandford, 60 U.S. 393 (1857). Did Congress wrongfully acquire half a continent? And what was the state of the union as of the Dred Scott decision?


Table Annexed To Article: From Treaty To Territory: Ocl Inventories American Expansion, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Aug 2012

Table Annexed To Article: From Treaty To Territory: Ocl Inventories American Expansion, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

OCL discusses patterns in state-making including nascent and nearly-nascent states. Divisions in acquisition and organization of land as well as management of territorial boundaries through multiple subdivisions are discussed.


Wrongfully ‘Established And Maintained’: A Census Of Congress’S Sins Against Geography, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Aug 2012

Wrongfully ‘Established And Maintained’: A Census Of Congress’S Sins Against Geography, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Taney, C.J. opined, for a majority of the Supreme Court, that Congress lacked the power to establish and maintain colonies as a system by which nascent states were groomed by Congress to join an expanding union. Dred Scott v. Sandford, 60 U.S. 393 (1857). Did Congress wrongfully acquire half a continent? And what was the state of the union as of the Dred Scott decision?


Table Annexed To Article: Taney’S Complaint: This Country’S Too Darn Big For Moveables, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Aug 2012

Table Annexed To Article: Taney’S Complaint: This Country’S Too Darn Big For Moveables, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Taney’s Dred Scott decision complains that Dred Scott’s freedom’s a federal taking of private property without compensation, a Fifth Amendment violation. How should mobilia be governed, given the nearly four dozen law-making jurisdictions, which, of 1857, are in the business of regulating attributes of mobilia; that is, assigning predicates to objects? A schema for tracking the claims teased out of Taney’s opinion is proposed. Can predicates in motion be made permanent?


History 650 Interviews: Disclaimer And Note On Use, Barbara Carol Allen Aug 2012

History 650 Interviews: Disclaimer And Note On Use, Barbara Carol Allen

Barbara Allen

No abstract provided.


List Of Interviews Conducted By History 650 Students, Barbara Carol Allen Aug 2012

List Of Interviews Conducted By History 650 Students, Barbara Carol Allen

Barbara Allen

Interviews of De La Salle Christian Brothers, La Salle College and La Salle University Alumni, Faculty, Staff, Administrators, and residents of neighborhoods around La Salle University.


America's First Secession: The Lost State Of Franklin Fell Just Short Of Admission To The Young Union, Kevin T. Barksdale Aug 2012

America's First Secession: The Lost State Of Franklin Fell Just Short Of Admission To The Young Union, Kevin T. Barksdale

Kevin T. Barksdale

On Dec. 14, 1784, a small assemblage of Tennessee Valley leading men met at a rustic courthouse in Jonesboro, N.C. under a darkening cloud of political uncertainty, 28 western political and economic leaders voted overwhelmingly to declare their communities' independence from their parent state of North Carolina and to form America's 14th state- Franklin.


“We Will Hold Our Land:” The Cherokee People In Postrevolutionary North America, 1781-1792, Kevin T. Barksdale Aug 2012

“We Will Hold Our Land:” The Cherokee People In Postrevolutionary North America, 1781-1792, Kevin T. Barksdale

Kevin T. Barksdale

In June of 1783, Spain’s newly-appointed Governor of Louisiana Estevan Miro convened a conference of southeastern Indians in Pensacola with representatives from the dominant regional Amerindian groups, including the Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Creeks in attendance. Among the attendees at the West Florida congress was a small contingent of Chickamauga Cherokee, led by their principal chief Dragging Canoe. During the parlay, Governor Miro implored the Indians to “not be afraid of the Americans,” promised to provide guns and ammunition in their ongoing efforts to prevent the further loss of their lands, and urged them to “continue to fight against American ...


Our Rebellious Neighbors : Virginia's Border Counties During Pennsylvania's Whiskey Rebellion, Kevin T. Barksdale Aug 2012

Our Rebellious Neighbors : Virginia's Border Counties During Pennsylvania's Whiskey Rebellion, Kevin T. Barksdale

Kevin T. Barksdale

Focuses on the 1794 Whiskey Rebellion in Pennsylvania, and its impact on the Virginia counties of Ohio, Harrison and Monongalia. Background on the Whiskey Rebellion; Concerns over the frontier dynamics occurring in Appalachian Virginia following the rebellion; Reaction from Pennsylvanians following the passage of the excise tax in March 1791.


Appalachia’S Borderland Brokers: The Intersection Of Kinship, Diplomacy, And Trade On The Trans-Montane Backcountry, 1600-1800, Kevin T. Barksdale Aug 2012

Appalachia’S Borderland Brokers: The Intersection Of Kinship, Diplomacy, And Trade On The Trans-Montane Backcountry, 1600-1800, Kevin T. Barksdale

Kevin T. Barksdale

This paper and accompanying historical argument builds upon the presentation I made at last year’s Ohio Valley History Conference held at Western Kentucky University. In that presentation, I argued that preindustrial Appalachia was a complex and dynamic borderland region in which disparate Amerindian groups and Euroamericans engaged in a wide-range of cultural, political, economic, and familial interactions. I challenged the Turnerian frontier model that characterized the North American backcountry as a steadily retreating “fall line” separating the savagery of Amerindian existence and the epidemic civility of Anglo-America. On the Turnerian frontier, Anglo-American culture washed over the Appalachian and Native ...


“Facing East” From Iberian America: Postrevolutionary Spanish Policies In The Southwestern Backcountry, 1783-1792, Kevin T. Barksdale Aug 2012

“Facing East” From Iberian America: Postrevolutionary Spanish Policies In The Southwestern Backcountry, 1783-1792, Kevin T. Barksdale

Kevin T. Barksdale

Following the American Revolution, the new United States government and its citizenry greedily cast their eyes westward across the expansive trans-Appalachian frontier. The contest between the region’s native peoples, Anglo-American westerners, and Spanish colonists for the trans-Appalachian West began long before the first shots of the Revolution were fired at Lexington & Concord. From the near perpetual regional Indian warfare to the diplomatic maneuverings of Euroamerican backcountry leaders, the struggle to control the land the Indians called the “western waters” defined borderland relations for most of the 18th century. Historians have devoted a great deal of scholarly energy to chronicling ...


Mr. Taney’S ‘Capital Gap’: Charting The Growth Of The Federal Colony System, 1789-1960, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jul 2012

Mr. Taney’S ‘Capital Gap’: Charting The Growth Of The Federal Colony System, 1789-1960, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

When Chief Justice Roger Taney conceded the existence of ‘colonies … established and maintained’ by the federal government, albeit denying ‘power given’ in the Constitution, he had the corpus of American history to contend with. The ‘capital gap,’ as OCL defines it, supplies several measures: the balance of power between regions, the remaining inventory of nascent (ready to be made) states (=territories), the remaining inventory of available territories in gross or subdividable, and for the latter two, the net of these inventories on a regional basis. Taney’s opinion, in this fourth in a series, rises or falls on the historical ...


The Imperial Semicolon Holds Court At Il Ristorante Beauflanx, Selections From Story Conquers, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jul 2012

The Imperial Semicolon Holds Court At Il Ristorante Beauflanx, Selections From Story Conquers, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Alaska Territory, July, 1947, Il Ristorante Beauflanx: At a dinner party the assembly turns its attention to the Imperial semicolon, citation to works published before the reign of Otto III, and the competing virtues of the double (“) vs. the single (‘) quotation mark. Dydo Barclay presides. Orthographically correct footwear does not make its appearance, however.


Table Annexed To Article: Mr. Madison Counts The Debates Of ‘The People In Their Conventions’, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jul 2012

Table Annexed To Article: Mr. Madison Counts The Debates Of ‘The People In Their Conventions’, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Madison referred to the ‘sense’ of the Constitution as the ‘sense attached to it by the people in their conventions.’ OCL tables the availability of that ‘sense’ as a resource through the publication (or lack thereof) of ratification convention journals and debates.