Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Digital Commons Network

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

PDF

Plant Sciences

Soybean

Institution
Publication Year
Publication
Publication Type

Articles 1 - 30 of 356

Full-Text Articles in Entire DC Network

Soybean Root Exudates Increase The Physiological Diversity Of Bacteria In Cadmium-Treated Soil, Leily Kazemi Movahed Feb 2020

Soybean Root Exudates Increase The Physiological Diversity Of Bacteria In Cadmium-Treated Soil, Leily Kazemi Movahed

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

Three soybean cultivars with contrasting retention of cadmium (Cd) in the root were grown in Cd-spiked nutrient solution and used to determine that symplastic compartmentalization of Cd in roots is probably responsible for retention of Cd in roots. Roots of the low Cd-accumulator AC Hime treated with 30 mM Cd exuded up to 10-fold higher concentrations of citric, succinic, fumaric and malic acids into the hydroponic solution when compared to control; concentrations of the same organic acids from the high Cd-accumulator Westag 97 increased by up to 3-fold. The same cultivars were grown in Cd-spiked soil and the physiological profiles ...


Soybean Response To Water: Trait Identification And Prediction, Shawn Jenkins Feb 2020

Soybean Response To Water: Trait Identification And Prediction, Shawn Jenkins

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Research in Agronomy and Horticulture

The rising demand for soybean [Glycine Max (L.) Merrill] taken in consideration with current climatic trends accentuates the importance of improving soybean seed yield response per unit water (WP). To further our understanding of the quantitative WP trait, a multi-omic approach was implemented for improved trait identification and predictive modeling opportunities. Through the evaluation of two recombinant inbred line populations jointly totaling 439 lines subjected to contrasting irrigation treatments, informative agronomic, phenomic, and genomic associations were identified. Across both populations, relationships were identified between lodging at maturity (r = -0.58, H = 0.86), canopy to air temperature differential at the ...


Computer Vision And Machine Learning Enabled Soybean Root Phenotyping Pipeline, Kevin G. Falk, Talukder Z. Jubery, Seyed V. Mirnezami, Kyle A. Parmley, Soumik Sarkar, Arti Singh, Baskar Ganapathysubramanian, Asheesh K. Singh Jan 2020

Computer Vision And Machine Learning Enabled Soybean Root Phenotyping Pipeline, Kevin G. Falk, Talukder Z. Jubery, Seyed V. Mirnezami, Kyle A. Parmley, Soumik Sarkar, Arti Singh, Baskar Ganapathysubramanian, Asheesh K. Singh

Mechanical Engineering Publications

Background Root system architecture (RSA) traits are of interest for breeding selection; however, measurement of these traits is difficult, resource intensive, and results in large variability. The advent of computer vision and machine learning (ML) enabled trait extraction and measurement has renewed interest in utilizing RSA traits for genetic enhancement to develop more robust and resilient crop cultivars. We developed a mobile, low-cost, and high-resolution root phenotyping system composed of an imaging platform with computer vision and ML based segmentation approach to establish a seamless end-to-end pipeline - from obtaining large quantities of root samples through image based trait processing and ...


Influence Of Burner Position On Temperature Distribution In Soybean Flaming, Miloš Miloš Rajkovic, Goran Malidža, Strahinja Stepanovic, Marko Kostic, Kristina Petrovic Jan 2020

Influence Of Burner Position On Temperature Distribution In Soybean Flaming, Miloš Miloš Rajkovic, Goran Malidža, Strahinja Stepanovic, Marko Kostic, Kristina Petrovic

West Central Research and Extension Center, North Platte

The main objective of this study was to identify optimal burner orientation for a newly designed flame cultivator by quantifying the flame temperature distributions of cross, back, and parallel position of burners at different heights of the soybean canopy (distance from the soil surface). Flame temperatures were measured within-row for three burner orientations at seven propane doses (20–100 kg/ha) and eight different canopy heights (0–18 cm above soil surface). Soybean plants in V3 growth stage were flamed with the same doses and burner orientations, and 28 days after treatment (DAT) crop injury (0%–100%), plant height (cm ...


Deconstructing The Genetic Architecture Of Iron Deficiency Chlorosis In Soybean Using Genome-Wide Approaches, Teshale Assefa, Jiaoping Zhang, R. V. Chowda-Reddy, Adrienne N. Moran Lauter, Arti Singh, Jamie A. O'Rourke, Michelle A. Graham, Asheesh K. Singh Jan 2020

Deconstructing The Genetic Architecture Of Iron Deficiency Chlorosis In Soybean Using Genome-Wide Approaches, Teshale Assefa, Jiaoping Zhang, R. V. Chowda-Reddy, Adrienne N. Moran Lauter, Arti Singh, Jamie A. O'Rourke, Michelle A. Graham, Asheesh K. Singh

Agronomy Publications

Background: Iron (Fe) is an essential micronutrient for plant growth and development. Iron deficiency chlorosis (IDC), caused by calcareous soils or high soil pH, can limit iron availability, negatively affecting soybean (Glycine max) yield. This study leverages genome-wide association study (GWAS) and a genome-wide epistatic study (GWES) with previous gene expression studies to identify regions of the soybean genome important in iron deficiency tolerance.

Results: A GWAS and a GWES were performed using 460 diverse soybean PI lines from 27 countries, in field and hydroponic iron stress conditions, using more than 36,000 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. Combining this ...


Arkansas Soybean Performance Tests 2019, J. F. Carlin, R. D. Bond, J. A. Still Dec 2019

Arkansas Soybean Performance Tests 2019, J. F. Carlin, R. D. Bond, J. A. Still

Research Series

Soybean variety and strain performance tests are conducted each year in Arkansas by the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture’s Arkansas Crop Variety Improvement Program. The tests provide information to companies developing varieties and/or marketing seed within the State, and aid the Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service in formulating variety recommendations for soybean producers.


Arkansas Soybean Research Studies 2018, Jeremy Ross Dec 2019

Arkansas Soybean Research Studies 2018, Jeremy Ross

Research Series

Arkansas is the leading soybean-producing state in the mid-southern United States. Arkansas ranked 11th in soybean production in 2018 when compared to the other soybean-producing states in the U.S. The state represents 3.7% of the total U.S. soybean production and 3.7% of the total acres planted in soybean in 2018. The 2018 state soybean average was 50.5 bushels per acre, half a bushel lower than the state record set in 2017. The top five soybean-producing counties in 2018 were Mississippi, Desha, Phillips, Arkansas, and Poinsett Counties (Table 1). These five counties accounted for 33.7 ...


The Effects Of Seed-Applied Fluopyram On Root Penetration And Development Of Meloidogyne Incognita On Cotton And Soybean, Tracy Hawk Dec 2019

The Effects Of Seed-Applied Fluopyram On Root Penetration And Development Of Meloidogyne Incognita On Cotton And Soybean, Tracy Hawk

Theses and Dissertations

Plant-parasitic nematodes are major pests of cotton and soybean in Arkansas, and across the Southern United States. These nematodes cause more than $3 billion worth of crop losses each year, in part due to lack of available control tactics, such as nematicides. Fluopyram has recently been registered as a seed-treatment nematicide in agronomic crops. The toxicity of fluopyram against Meloidogyne incognita infection has been reported, however, information on root protection provided by fluopyram against Meloidogyne incognita is lacking. The first objective of this research was to evaluate the effect seed-applied fluopyram had on nematode development, root galling, and reproduction on ...


Understanding Nitrogen Limitation In Soybean, Nicolas Cafaro La Menza Dec 2019

Understanding Nitrogen Limitation In Soybean, Nicolas Cafaro La Menza

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Research in Agronomy and Horticulture

Meeting soybean demand on existing cropland area for a global population of 9.7 billion people by the year 2050 requires narrowing the existing gap between average producer yield and yield potential. Soybean relies on two sources on nitrogen (N): biological N2 fixation and indigenous soil N supply. As soybean yield continues to increase, it seems critical to know if there is a yield level at which potential contribution of indigenous nitrogen sources and fixation becomes insufficient to meet crop N requirements for high yields, while still maintaining or increasing protein and oil concentration. This study evaluated N limitation across ...


Mitigating Herbicide Impacts To Soybean, Grant Lawson Priess Dec 2019

Mitigating Herbicide Impacts To Soybean, Grant Lawson Priess

Theses and Dissertations

The rapidity in evolution of herbicide-resistant weeds and the resulting cost to U.S. farmers demonstrate the need to responsibly steward the limited number of herbicides available in agricultural systems. To reduce weed emergence and likewise added selection pressures placed on herbicides, early-season crop canopy formation has been promoted. However, impacts to soybean following a potentially injurious herbicide application have not been thoroughly evaluated. Therefore, field experiments were conducted to determine whether: 1) soybean injury from metribuzin or flumioxazin delayed canopy formation or changed the incidence of pathogen colonization; 2) residual herbicides applied preplant reduced the potential for soybean injury ...


Integration Of Cover Crops Into Midwest Corn-Soybean Cropping Systems And Potential For Weed Suppression, Joshua S. Wehrbein Dec 2019

Integration Of Cover Crops Into Midwest Corn-Soybean Cropping Systems And Potential For Weed Suppression, Joshua S. Wehrbein

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Research in Agronomy and Horticulture

Cover crops have potential to provide benefits to agricultural systems, such as improved soil productivity, nutrient scavenging, weed suppression, and livestock forage. There are several challenges associated with cover crop integration into traditional Midwest corn-soybean cropping systems. One of these challenges is timely establishment in the fall, which is limited by the relatively late harvest of corn and soybean. Cover crop effectiveness is related to the amount of biomass produced, thus maximizing the growth period in the fall is desired. To address this challenge, we evaluated the potential to utilize early-season soybean maturity groups (MGs) to allow for earlier soybean ...


Regenerating Agricultural Landscapes With Perennial Groundcover For Intensive Crop Production, Kenneth J. Moore, Robert P. Anex, Amani E. Elobeid, Shuizhang Fei, Cornelia B. Flora, A. Susana Goggi, Keri L. Jacobs, Prashant Jha, Amy L. Kaleita, Douglas L. Karlen, David A. Laird, Andrew W. Lenssen, Thomas Lubberstedt, Marshall D. Mcdaniel, D. Raj Raman, Sharon L. Weyers Aug 2019

Regenerating Agricultural Landscapes With Perennial Groundcover For Intensive Crop Production, Kenneth J. Moore, Robert P. Anex, Amani E. Elobeid, Shuizhang Fei, Cornelia B. Flora, A. Susana Goggi, Keri L. Jacobs, Prashant Jha, Amy L. Kaleita, Douglas L. Karlen, David A. Laird, Andrew W. Lenssen, Thomas Lubberstedt, Marshall D. Mcdaniel, D. Raj Raman, Sharon L. Weyers

Douglas L Karlen

The Midwestern U.S. landscape is one of the most highly altered and intensively managed ecosystems in the country. The predominant crops grown are maize (Zea mays L.) and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr]. They are typically grown as monocrops in a simple yearly rotation or with multiple years of maize (2 to 3) followed by a single year of soybean. This system is highly productive because the crops and management systems have been well adapted to the regional growing conditions through substantial public and private investment. Furthermore, markets and supporting infrastructure are highly developed for both crops. As maize ...


Plant Disease Identification Using Explainable 3d Deep Learning On Hyperspectral Images, Koushik Nagasubramanian, Sarah Jones, Asheesh K. Singh, Soumik Sarkar, Arti Singh, Baskar Ganapathysubramanian Aug 2019

Plant Disease Identification Using Explainable 3d Deep Learning On Hyperspectral Images, Koushik Nagasubramanian, Sarah Jones, Asheesh K. Singh, Soumik Sarkar, Arti Singh, Baskar Ganapathysubramanian

Mechanical Engineering Publications

Background

Hyperspectral imaging is emerging as a promising approach for plant disease identification. The large and possibly redundant information contained in hyperspectral data cubes makes deep learning based identification of plant diseases a natural fit. Here, we deploy a novel 3D deep convolutional neural network (DCNN) that directly assimilates the hyperspectral data. Furthermore, we interrogate the learnt model to produce physiologically meaningful explanations. We focus on an economically important disease, charcoal rot, which is a soil borne fungal disease that affects the yield of soybean crops worldwide.

Results

Based on hyperspectral imaging of inoculated and mock-inoculated stem images, our 3D ...


Studies On Pathogenesis Of The Diseases Caused By Macrophomina Phaseolina And Phomopsis Longicolla On Soybean, Marcio Leizer Zaccaron Aug 2019

Studies On Pathogenesis Of The Diseases Caused By Macrophomina Phaseolina And Phomopsis Longicolla On Soybean, Marcio Leizer Zaccaron

Theses and Dissertations

Soybean (Glycine max), a legume, is an economically important crop in many parts of the world, including the USA, Brazil, Argentina, China, and India, currently the top five producing countries. Soybean is primarily used as feed, with incising markets for food and biodiesel. Similar to most crops, soybean yield and quality are affected by a diverse group of plant pathogens. In particular, several species of filamentous fungi have been the cause of severe yield losses in most growing regions world-wide. The soil born fungus Macrophomina phaseolina, causal agent of charcoal rot, has been found to be endemic to several soybean ...


Mid To Late Season Weed Detection In Soybean Production Fields Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle And Machine Learning, Arun Narenthiran Veeranampalayam Sivakumar Jul 2019

Mid To Late Season Weed Detection In Soybean Production Fields Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle And Machine Learning, Arun Narenthiran Veeranampalayam Sivakumar

Biological Systems Engineering--Dissertations, Theses, and Student Research

Mid-late season weeds are those that escape the early season herbicide applications and those that emerge late in the season. They might not affect the crop yield, but if uncontrolled, will produce a large number of seeds causing problems in the subsequent years. In this study, high-resolution aerial imagery of mid-season weeds in soybean fields was captured using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and the performance of two different automated weed detection approaches – patch-based classification and object detection was studied for site-specific weed management. For the patch-based classification approach, several conventional machine learning models on Haralick texture features were compared ...


Developing Management Strategies For Taproot Decline, Xylaria Sp., In Soybean, Myra Purvis Jul 2019

Developing Management Strategies For Taproot Decline, Xylaria Sp., In Soybean, Myra Purvis

LSU Master's Theses

Soybean (Glycine max) is one of the most important oilseed crops in the world. Taproot decline is a recently discovered disease caused by Xylaria sp., a novel species located within the Xylaria arbuscula aggregate. Foliar symptoms include interveinal chlorosis and necrosis, and upon further investigation, there are often dead plants adjacent within the row. Many other soybean diseases have similar foliar symptoms; therefore, more examination is usually required for proper identification. Soybean debris from previous years is suspected to be the primary source of inoculum. Plants may be infected at any point during the growing season, often resulting in premature ...


Effect Of Soil-Applied Protoporphyrinogen Oxidase Inhibitor Herbicides On Soybean Seedling Disease, Nicholas J. Arneson May 2019

Effect Of Soil-Applied Protoporphyrinogen Oxidase Inhibitor Herbicides On Soybean Seedling Disease, Nicholas J. Arneson

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Research in Agronomy and Horticulture

Seedling disease is one the most economically important diseases of soybean in the United States. It is commonly caused by Fusarium spp., Rhizoctonia solani, Pythium spp., and Phytophthora sojae, alone, or together as a disease complex. Fungicide seed treatments continue to provide the most consistent management of seedling diseases. Soil-applied protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO) inhibitor herbicides are used preemergence in soybean production to manage several broadleaf weeds. Applications of PPO-inhibitors can result in phytotoxic injury to soybean when environmental conditions are not favorable for soybean growth. These environmental conditions can favor seedling disease development as well. In this thesis, two studies ...


Studies On The Impact Of Cover Crops On Soybean Productivity And Root Diseases, Grazieli Da Araldi Da Silva Jan 2019

Studies On The Impact Of Cover Crops On Soybean Productivity And Root Diseases, Grazieli Da Araldi Da Silva

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Soybean (Glycine max L.) and corn (Zea mays L.) are the two main field crops grown in the Midwest, and they are usually used in a rotation system (FAOSTAT, 2018). This cropping system contributes to the elevated nitrate levels found in the surface waters in the Midwest (David et al., 1997; Dinnes et al., 2002), along with higher risk of soil erosion (Pimentel et al., 1995) and loss of nutrients and organic matter (Burkart and James, 1999; David and Gentry, 2000). Cover crops, grown between soybean or corn harvest in the fall and planting of the subsequent crop in the ...


A Comparison Of March And April Soybean Planting Dates In South-Central Illinois, Nicholas Patrick Marley Jan 2019

A Comparison Of March And April Soybean Planting Dates In South-Central Illinois, Nicholas Patrick Marley

Creative Components

One of the biggest issues with ultra-early planting of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is the lack of research that has been conducted. This study is designed to increase the knowledge base of soybean planting dates by looking at ultra-early (March) versus early (April) planted soybean in south-central Illinois. Field research was conducted in two fields, near Morrisonville, IL over the 2017 and 2018 growing season. In 2017, the March planted soybean required 19 days to gain 121 GDD for emergence to start. Compared to the April planting date where emergence was in 7 days with 123 GDD accumulation. In ...


Management Strategies For Double-Crop Soybean Planted After Wheat, D. S. S. Hansel, J. Kimball, I. A. Ciampitti Jan 2019

Management Strategies For Double-Crop Soybean Planted After Wheat, D. S. S. Hansel, J. Kimball, I. A. Ciampitti

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Double-crop (DC) soybeans (Glycine max L.) are gaining popularity as an alternative system to intensify productivity without expanding the farming area and can potentially increase net return. However, the DC soybean system faces many challenges such as late planting, which decreases yield potential. A study was conducted in four site-years in Ashland Bottoms, KS, during the 2016 and 2017 growing seasons. In both years, the soybean variety planted was Asgrow 4232 (MG 4.2). The soybean was planted right after two different wheat harvest timings (Study 1, early-wheat harvest 18–20% mois­ture; and Study 2, conventional-harvest 13–14% moisture ...


Tillage And Nitrogen Placement Effects On Yields In A Short-Season Corn/Wheat/Double-Crop Soybean Rotation, D. W. Sweeney, D. Ruiz-Diaz Jan 2019

Tillage And Nitrogen Placement Effects On Yields In A Short-Season Corn/Wheat/Double-Crop Soybean Rotation, D. W. Sweeney, D. Ruiz-Diaz

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

In 2018, adding nitrogen (N) greatly improved average wheat yields with about a 10% increase with knife compared to broadcast application methods. Even though tillage did not affect wheat yields, soybean yield was about 10% greater with no-till.


Response Of Soybean Grown On A Claypan Soil In Southeastern Kansas To The Residual Of Different Plant Nutrient Sources And Tillage, D. W. Sweeney, P. Barnes, G. Pierzynski Jan 2019

Response Of Soybean Grown On A Claypan Soil In Southeastern Kansas To The Residual Of Different Plant Nutrient Sources And Tillage, D. W. Sweeney, P. Barnes, G. Pierzynski

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The residual from previous high-rate turkey litter applications, which were based on nitrogen (N) requirements of the previous grain sorghum crop, increased 2018 soybean yield more than that obtained from the residual of phosphorus (P)-based turkey litter applications (low rate), commercial fertilizer, or the control. Even though early soybean growth was sporadically affected by residual treatments, the dry matter production at the R6 growth stage tended to be where the N-based litter was applied.


Controlling Soil-Borne Disease In Soybean With A Mustard Cover Crop, G. F. Sassenrath, C. Little, K. Roozeboom, X. Lin, D. Jardine Jan 2019

Controlling Soil-Borne Disease In Soybean With A Mustard Cover Crop, G. F. Sassenrath, C. Little, K. Roozeboom, X. Lin, D. Jardine

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Charcoal rot is a soil-borne disease that is prevalent in southeast Kansas. The disease infects multiple crops, including soybean, and causes yield reductions. A high-gluco­sinolate mustard with biofumigant properties reduced the population levels in soil and in soybean plants of the fungus (Macrophomina phaseolina) that causes charcoal rot. In this study, management practices that incorporate use of mustard as a cover crop in soybean production systems were tested. Results indicate that tillage increases the char­coal rot fungus. The mustard cover crop was tested in field studies for its impact on soil health, fungal disease and propagules, and soybean ...


Historical Soybean Study: Grain Filling × Nitrogen Fixation, S. Tamagno, I. A. Ciampitti Jan 2019

Historical Soybean Study: Grain Filling × Nitrogen Fixation, S. Tamagno, I. A. Ciampitti

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Genetic gain is characterized by comparing the performance of genotypes from a different year of release. Historic studies are useful to understand changes in yield-related traits that also contribute to yield potential. This study aims to quantify yield improvement for soybean through a set of seven genotypes with different years of release, and their respective numerical components, with a focus on final seed weight generation under two different nitrogen (N) conditions. Changes in biological N fixa­tion (BNF) were quantified during the seed-filling period (SFP). Non-linear models were fit to the data to characterize seed weight and BNF changes throughout ...


Kansas Field Research 2019 Jan 2019

Kansas Field Research 2019

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Research from Kansas State University experiment fields on crop varieties, tillage, irrigation, weed management, and fertilizers.


Regenerating Agricultural Landscapes With Perennial Groundcover For Intensive Crop Production, Kenneth J. Moore, Robert P. Anex, Amani E. Elobeid, Shuizhang Fei, Cornelia B. Flora, A. Susana Goggi, Keri L. Jacobs, Prashant Jha, Amy L. Kaleita, Douglas L. Karlen, David A. Laird, Andrew W. Lenssen, Thomas Lubberstedt, Marshall D. Mcdaniel, D. Raj Raman, Sharon L. Weyers Jan 2019

Regenerating Agricultural Landscapes With Perennial Groundcover For Intensive Crop Production, Kenneth J. Moore, Robert P. Anex, Amani E. Elobeid, Shuizhang Fei, Cornelia B. Flora, A. Susana Goggi, Keri L. Jacobs, Prashant Jha, Amy L. Kaleita, Douglas L. Karlen, David A. Laird, Andrew W. Lenssen, Thomas Lubberstedt, Marshall D. Mcdaniel, D. Raj Raman, Sharon L. Weyers

Agronomy Publications

The Midwestern U.S. landscape is one of the most highly altered and intensively managed ecosystems in the country. The predominant crops grown are maize (Zea mays L.) and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr]. They are typically grown as monocrops in a simple yearly rotation or with multiple years of maize (2 to 3) followed by a single year of soybean. This system is highly productive because the crops and management systems have been well adapted to the regional growing conditions through substantial public and private investment. Furthermore, markets and supporting infrastructure are highly developed for both crops. As maize ...


Influence Of Soybean Planting Date On Sudden Death Syndrome And Soybean Yield, E. A. Adee, C. R. Little, I. A. Ciampitti Jan 2019

Influence Of Soybean Planting Date On Sudden Death Syndrome And Soybean Yield, E. A. Adee, C. R. Little, I. A. Ciampitti

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Sudden death syndrome (SDS) is a disease caused by the soilborne fungus Fusarium virguliforme. This fungus prefers wet conditions and thus is usually most severe in irri­gated fields. Sudden death syndrome tends to be most severe on well-managed soybeans with a high yield potential. It also tends to be more prevalent on fields that are infested with soybean cyst nematode (SCN) or planted early when soils are wet and cool. Historical yield losses from this disease are generally in the range of 1–25%.

Soybean planting dates have been moving increasingly earlier in much of the soybean growing region ...


Characterizing Spatiotemporal Patterns Of White Mold In Soybean Across South Dakota Using Remote Sensing, Confiance L. Mfuka Jan 2019

Characterizing Spatiotemporal Patterns Of White Mold In Soybean Across South Dakota Using Remote Sensing, Confiance L. Mfuka

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Soybean is among the most important crops, cultivated primarily for beans, which are used for food, feed, and biofuel. According to FAO, the United States was the biggest soybeans producer in 2016. The main soybean producing regions in the United States are the Corn Belt and the lower Mississippi Valley. Despite its importance, soybean production is reduced by several diseases, among which Sclerotinia stem rot, also known as white mold, a fungal disease that is caused by the fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is among the top 10 soybean diseases. The disease may attack several plants and considerably reduce yield. According to ...


Species Of Fusarium Causing Root Rot Of Soybean In South Dakota: Characterization, Pathogenicity, And Interaction With Heterodera Glycines, Paul Nyawanda Okello Jan 2019

Species Of Fusarium Causing Root Rot Of Soybean In South Dakota: Characterization, Pathogenicity, And Interaction With Heterodera Glycines, Paul Nyawanda Okello

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

In South Dakota, Fusarium-associated diseases (e.g. seedling diseases, root rot and sudden death syndrome) are emerging threats to soybean production. Several species of Fusarium have been reported to cause these diseases in the soybean producing regions of the United States and in the world. However, little information is available on the species of Fusarium causing soybean root rot in South Dakota and their pathogenicity. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to (1) characterize the species of Fusarium causing soybean root rot in South Dakota; (2) evaluate the cross-pathogenicity of species of Fusarium causing root rot of soybean and ...


Cropping Sequence Affects Subsequent Soybean Yield, Soil Microbiome And Soil Health, Izzet Bulbul Jan 2019

Cropping Sequence Affects Subsequent Soybean Yield, Soil Microbiome And Soil Health, Izzet Bulbul

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Rotation is an important cultural practice that farmers use to manage crop growth and diseases. Diversified crop rotations directly affect plant residue inputs that may enrich specific groups of microbes that form beneficial associations with the following crop. At two field sites, yield differences were observed in soybeans planted after the following four long-term (14 year) crop sequences: continuous corn (CC), corn (Zea mays)/corn/soybean (Glycine max) (CCS), corn/soybean/corn (CSC), soybean/corn/soybean (SCS). Soybean yields were in decreasing order, CC>CCS>CSC>SCS, and the yield differences could not be explained by soil chemical and ...