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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Why Are We Still Scared Of Seeing Two Men Kissing?, Scott J. Mckinnon Jan 2016

Why Are We Still Scared Of Seeing Two Men Kissing?, Scott J. Mckinnon

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Although details remain uncertain, the father of Omar Mateen has claimed that his son's murderous acts in Orlando's Pulse nightclub last Saturday may have been inspired by the sight of two men kissing. In response, a twitter campaign with the hashtag #TwoMenKissing has encouraged men to tweet photographs of themselves kissing another man. This is an act of pride and defiance in the face of violent oppression. It also reveals the ongoing politics of men kissing in public.


Living With Landscape Fire: Landholder Understandings Of Agency, Scale And Control Within Fiery Entanglements, Amanda Edwards, Nicholas J. Gill Jan 2016

Living With Landscape Fire: Landholder Understandings Of Agency, Scale And Control Within Fiery Entanglements, Amanda Edwards, Nicholas J. Gill

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Around the world, debates over how to manage and adapt to bushfires (or wildfires) are increasingly prominent as more and different people, many of whom have little or no experience with landscape fire or land management, inhabit fire-prone environments. But bushfire events represent only the most visible aspect of complex entanglements which operate across huge temporal and spatial scales and over which humans have very limited control. In this article, we focus on how Australian landholders of settler or migrant heritage understand scalar complexities and agency and control within human/landscape fire entanglements. In view of the fact that the ...


Evaluation Of Inorganic Arsenic Exposure At Multi Metal Processing Facility. When Air Monitoring Alone Just Doesn't Work!, Stuart J. Roseberg, Jane L. Whitelaw Jan 2016

Evaluation Of Inorganic Arsenic Exposure At Multi Metal Processing Facility. When Air Monitoring Alone Just Doesn't Work!, Stuart J. Roseberg, Jane L. Whitelaw

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Metals smelting and processing has been associated with exposure to airborne inorganic arsenic and an increased risk of health effects. Biological monitoring on a metals processing site identified urinary arsenic concentrations exceeding corporate and ACGIH guidelines at levels associated with increased risks of health effects. Plant operators considered the inhalation of arsenic trioxide powder (As2O3), used in the process, as the source of their exposure. This study's initial objective was to determine operator exposures to airborne inorganic arsenic. Two groups of plant operators participated in full shift personal air monitoring and biological monitoring over their working weeks. In parallel ...


How Schools Avoid Enrolling Children With Disabilities, Linda J. Graham, Helen Proctor, Roselyn M. Dixon Jan 2016

How Schools Avoid Enrolling Children With Disabilities, Linda J. Graham, Helen Proctor, Roselyn M. Dixon

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Children with disabilities are frequently discriminated against in Australian schools. It's an issue that has been ongoing for years, with reports showing that little has improved since 2002. Exclusion practices - dubbed as "gatekeeping" - include advising parents to send their child to another school that could better support them; only allowing a child to attend a school on the days that funding is available; and asking parents to pay extra money so the school can employ support staff or purchase equipment. Although this happens across all school types, it tends to be more prominent in, and easier for, non-government or ...


Into The Firing Line: Civilian Ingress During The 2013 "Red October" Bushfires, Australia, Carrie Wilkinson, Christine Eriksen, Trent D. Penman Jan 2016

Into The Firing Line: Civilian Ingress During The 2013 "Red October" Bushfires, Australia, Carrie Wilkinson, Christine Eriksen, Trent D. Penman

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

A major issue for bushfire management arises when residents decide to leave a safe area and enter the fire zone to rescue or defend their property, pets, loved ones or other assets. Here, we use statistical and narrative analyses of data from an online survey and semi-structured interviews with residents affected by the 2013 "Red October" bushfires in New South Wales, Australia. The survey results revealed that of the 58 % of respondents who were not at home at the time the threat became apparent, 65 % indicated that they attempted to get home prior to the arrival of the fire front ...


Sexual Harassment And Gender Discrimination In Wildland Fire Management Must Be Addressed, Christine Eriksen Jan 2016

Sexual Harassment And Gender Discrimination In Wildland Fire Management Must Be Addressed, Christine Eriksen

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Sexual harassment and gender discrimination are behavioral patterns not uncommon in the many varied settings of wildland fire. Whether in the classroom, on the fireline, in a government or non-governmental organization office, women and men are subjected to and are targets of sexual harassment and gender discrimination on a daily basis. The prevalence of this issue, its causes, its impacts, and potential solutions are the foci of this Associa- tion for Fire Ecology (AFE) position paper.


Ethical Aspects Of Cancer Screening, Stacy M. Carter Jan 2016

Ethical Aspects Of Cancer Screening, Stacy M. Carter

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Screening for cancer or cancer risk is well-established in high-income countries. This article considers ethical aspects of cancer screening. Ethical evaluation of screening depends on a contested evidence base, interacts with people's fear of cancer, and their enthusiasm for technology in general and screening in particular. Cancer screening is both a clinical and a public health activity, and so the often-conflicting frameworks from both clinical ethics and public health ethics are relevant to its evaluation. Cancer screening is an intrusion by health services into the lives of well individuals and so requires strong justification. Cancer screening can and should ...


Illawarra Aboriginal Community Profile: A Snapshot Of An Urban Aboriginal Community, Kathleen F. Clapham, Scott F. Winch, Valerie Harwood, Peter James Kelly, Paul A. Chandler, Kate Senior, Darcelle Wu Jan 2016

Illawarra Aboriginal Community Profile: A Snapshot Of An Urban Aboriginal Community, Kathleen F. Clapham, Scott F. Winch, Valerie Harwood, Peter James Kelly, Paul A. Chandler, Kate Senior, Darcelle Wu

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

This community profile report provides information about the Aboriginal population of the Illawarra Region. It is intended to begin a discussion about how research can contribute to the social health and wellbeing of Aboriginal people. The report highlights disparities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians that are apparent not only in the health statistics but also in almost every key socioeconomic indicator.

However the report is not just about ill-health and disadvantage. The Illawarra region has numerous well-established Aboriginal-controlled organisations which provide important leadership and social health and wellbeing services for Aboriginal people, many of which have survived within the region ...


Objectivity And Critique: The Creation Of Historical Perspectives In Senior Secondary Writing, Erika S. Matruglio Jan 2016

Objectivity And Critique: The Creation Of Historical Perspectives In Senior Secondary Writing, Erika S. Matruglio

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

The increasing literacy demands of senior secondary studies have been noted by government agencies and scholars both in Australia and overseas. Disciplinary differences in writing has similarly received attention, although much of the research in this area has focused on the junior school, or spanned the whole of the secondary context. Less research has been focused specifically on disciplinarity in the senior high school, or on differences within what may often be conceived as a single discipline, such as between writing in Modern and Ancient History. This paper investigates disciplinary difference in the context of senior secondary writing for Modern ...


Hpe Teachers' Negotiation Of Environmental Health Spaces: Discursive Positions, Embodiment And Materialism, Nicole Taylor, Jan Wright, Gabrielle H. O'Flynn Jan 2016

Hpe Teachers' Negotiation Of Environmental Health Spaces: Discursive Positions, Embodiment And Materialism, Nicole Taylor, Jan Wright, Gabrielle H. O'Flynn

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

A National Curriculum in Health and Physical Education (HPE) has recently been developed in Australia. This new curriculum reflects, among other educational priorities, both environmental sensitivities and a commitment to the enhancement of young people's health and wellbeing. HPE is one of the key sites in the curriculum where a focused consideration of the relationship between the environment and health is possible. However, to date no research has considered the ways that HPE teachers might recognise and negotiate these spaces. The research described in this paper addresses this gap through an analysis of semi-structured interviews with generalist primary and ...


Re-Thinking Climate Change Adaptation And Capacities At The Household Scale, Stephanie Toole, Natascha Klocker, Lesley M. Head Jan 2016

Re-Thinking Climate Change Adaptation And Capacities At The Household Scale, Stephanie Toole, Natascha Klocker, Lesley M. Head

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

The reality of anthropogenic climate change has rendered adaptive responses at all scales an imperative. Households are an increasing focus of attention, but more in the developing world than the developed world, because of the presumed lesser vulnerabilities and stronger adaptive capacities of the latter. Critiques of such presumptions, and the quantitative, macro-scale focus of much adaptation research are emergent. How relatively affluent households, as complex social assemblages, may adapt to climate change impacts encountered in their day-to-day functioning remains unclear. There is, however, a sizeable body of research on household environmental sustainability in the developed world. That research has ...


Energy Cost Of Physical Activities And Sedentary Behaviors In Young Children, Anja Grobek, Christiana Van Loo, Gregory E. Peoples, Markus Hagenbuchner, Rachel A. Jones, Dylan P. Cliff Jan 2016

Energy Cost Of Physical Activities And Sedentary Behaviors In Young Children, Anja Grobek, Christiana Van Loo, Gregory E. Peoples, Markus Hagenbuchner, Rachel A. Jones, Dylan P. Cliff

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Background: This study reports energy expenditure (EE) data for lifestyle and ambulatory activities in young children. Methods: Eleven children aged 3 to 6 years (mean age = 4.8 ± 0.9; 55% boys) completed 12 semistructured activities including sedentary behaviors (SB), light (LPA), and moderate-to-vigorous physical activities (MVPA) over 2 laboratory visits while wearing a portable metabolic system to measure EE. Results: Mean EE values for SB (TV, reading, tablet and toy play) were between 0.9 to 1.1 kcal/min. Standing art had an energy cost that was 1.5 times that of SB (mean = 1.4 kcal/min ...


Avoiding The Manufacture Of 'Sameness': First-In-Family Students, Cultural Capital And The Higher Education Environment, Sarah Elizabeth O'Shea Jan 2016

Avoiding The Manufacture Of 'Sameness': First-In-Family Students, Cultural Capital And The Higher Education Environment, Sarah Elizabeth O'Shea

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Drawing upon Bourdieu's theories of social and cultural capital, a number of studies of the higher education environment have indicated that students who are first-in-family to come to university may lack the necessary capitals to enact success. To address this issue, university transition strategies often have the primary objective of 'filling students up' with legitimate forms of cultural capital required by the institution. However, this article argues that such an approach is fundamentally flawed, as students can be either framed as deficit or replete in capitals depending on how their particular background and capabilities are perceived. Drawing on interviews ...


'We Are History In The Making And We Are Walking Together To Change Things For The Better': Exploring The Flows And Ripples Of Learning In A Mentoring Program For Indigenous Young People, Sarah Elizabeth O'Shea, Samantha Mcmahon, Amy Priestly, Gawaian Bodkin-Andrews, Valerie Harwood Jan 2016

'We Are History In The Making And We Are Walking Together To Change Things For The Better': Exploring The Flows And Ripples Of Learning In A Mentoring Program For Indigenous Young People, Sarah Elizabeth O'Shea, Samantha Mcmahon, Amy Priestly, Gawaian Bodkin-Andrews, Valerie Harwood

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

This article explores the unique mentoring model that the Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience (AIME) has established to assist Australian Indigenous young people succeed educationally. AIME can be described as a structured educational mentoring programme, which recruits university students to mentor Indigenous high school students. The success of the programme is unequivocal, with the AIME Indigenous mentees completing high school and the transition to further education and employment at higher rates than their non-AIME Indigenous counterparts. This article reports on a study that sought to deeply explore the particular approach to mentoring that AIME adopts. The study drew upon interviews, observations ...


Supporting And Engaging Students Who Are The First In Their Families To Attend University: A Practise Paper, Sarah Elizabeth O'Shea Jan 2016

Supporting And Engaging Students Who Are The First In Their Families To Attend University: A Practise Paper, Sarah Elizabeth O'Shea

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Globally, first-in-family learners represent a significant proportion of the university student population, yet these high rates of participation are not necessarily matched by equally high success rates. Instead, internationally the research on this group indicates that these learners are at greater risk of departure from university when compared to their second and third generation peers, often as a result of limited exposure to academic culture and expectations. This article provides an overview of current research on first-in-family learners and also, offers some recommendations for supporting and engaging with this cohort within university settings.


Cities Of Australia And The Pacific Islands, Robyn Dowling, Pauline M. Mcguirk Jan 2016

Cities Of Australia And The Pacific Islands, Robyn Dowling, Pauline M. Mcguirk

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

The Pacific region is a constellation of islands of varying sizes. Australia (the island continent) and Aotearoa/New Zealand (now carrying both Maori and Pakeha, or settler, names) dominate the region geographically and economically. However, many smaller islands are found in those vast realms of the Pacific Ocean known as Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia. Socially, politically, economically, and biophysically, this is a diverse region with diverse cities. In this part of the world, it is easiest to understand cities as forming two main groups: those of Australia and Aotearoa/New Zealand, and those of the Pacific Islands.


Demonstrating Retrofitting: Perspectives From Australian Local Government, Robyn Dowling, Pauline M. Mcguirk, Harriet Bulkeley Jan 2016

Demonstrating Retrofitting: Perspectives From Australian Local Government, Robyn Dowling, Pauline M. Mcguirk, Harriet Bulkeley

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Cities are critical to transitions to low carbon futures, not only because of the large and growing global urban population but also because global resource consumption is concentrated in cities (Gossop, 2011:208; Hodson, Marvin, Robinson, & Swilling, 2012; Monstadt, 2007). Ensuring that new urban spaces, such as new housing or new city precincts, are low or zero carbon is central to these transitions (Hodson & Marvin, 2010). Yet, equally important to reducing urban carbon consumption is the retrofitting of existing urban planning frameworks and imaginaries, infrastructure, built form and patterns of daily life (Eames et.al., 2013; Pincetl, 2012). Retrofitting involves the modification of what already exists in cities: altering the ways in which existing buildings are heated and cooled, diverting households, businesses and organisations toward renewable sources of energy rather than fossil fuels, encouraging ...


Planned Derailment For New Urban Futures? An Actant Network Analysis Of The "Great [Light] Rail Debate" In Newcastle, Australia, Kristian J. Ruming, Kathleen Mee, Pauline M. Mcguirk Jan 2016

Planned Derailment For New Urban Futures? An Actant Network Analysis Of The "Great [Light] Rail Debate" In Newcastle, Australia, Kristian J. Ruming, Kathleen Mee, Pauline M. Mcguirk

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

With urban and economic restructuring, facilitating urban regeneration for rundown post- industrial cities has become a central urban planning policy objective in Western cities since the late twentieth century, leaving some centres in prolonged social and economic decline. This chapter explores one example of planning policies seeking to regenerate an urban centre. Our focus is Newcastle, approximately 160km (100 miles) north of Sydney, Australia. Newcastle has a long history as an industrial city, dominated by manufacturing and coal-mining in the surrounding Hunter Valley. The port of Newcastle remains the world's largest coal export port. In 1999, BHP closed the ...


Protocol For A Systematic Review Of Evaluation Research For Adults Who Have Participated In The 'Smart Recovery' Mutual Support Programme, Alison K. Beck, Amanda Baker, Peter James Kelly, Frank P. Deane, Anthony Shakeshaft, David Hunt, Erin Forbes, John F. Kelly Jan 2016

Protocol For A Systematic Review Of Evaluation Research For Adults Who Have Participated In The 'Smart Recovery' Mutual Support Programme, Alison K. Beck, Amanda Baker, Peter James Kelly, Frank P. Deane, Anthony Shakeshaft, David Hunt, Erin Forbes, John F. Kelly

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Introduction Self-Management and Recovery Training (SMART Recovery) offers an alternative to predominant 12-step approaches to mutual aid (eg, alcoholics anonymous). Although the principles (eg, self-efficacy) and therapeutic approaches (eg, motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioural therapy) of SMART Recovery are evidence based, further clarity regarding the direct evidence of its effectiveness as a mutual aid package is needed. Relative to methodologically rigorous reviews supporting the efficacy of 12-step approaches, to date, reviews of SMART Recovery have been descriptive. We aim to address this gap by providing a comprehensive overview of the evidence for SMART Recovery in adults with problematic alcohol, substance ...


Crime And Victimisation In People With Intellectual Disability: A Case Linkage Study, Billy C. Fogden, Stuart Dm Thomas, Michael D. Daffern, James R. P Ogloff Jan 2016

Crime And Victimisation In People With Intellectual Disability: A Case Linkage Study, Billy C. Fogden, Stuart Dm Thomas, Michael D. Daffern, James R. P Ogloff

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Background Studies have suggested that people with intellectual disability are disproportionately involved in crime both as perpetrators and victims. Method A case linkage design used three Australian contact-level databases, from disability services, public mental health services and police records. Rates of contact, and official records of victimisation and criminal charges were compared to those in a community sample without intellectual disability. Results Although people with intellectual disability were significantly less likely to have an official record of victimisation and offending overall, their rates of violent and sexual victimisation and offending were significantly higher. The presence of comorbid mental illness considerably ...


A Nutrient Profiling Assessment Of Packaged Foods Using Two Star-Based Front-Of-Pack Labels, Amy Carrad, Jimmy Chun Yu Louie, Heather Yeatman, Elizabeth K. Dunford, Bruce Neal, Victoria M. Flood Jan 2016

A Nutrient Profiling Assessment Of Packaged Foods Using Two Star-Based Front-Of-Pack Labels, Amy Carrad, Jimmy Chun Yu Louie, Heather Yeatman, Elizabeth K. Dunford, Bruce Neal, Victoria M. Flood

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Objective: To compare two front-of-pack nutrition labelling systems for the assessment of packaged foods and drinks with Australian Dietary Guidelines. Design: A cross-sectional nutrient profiling assessment. Food and drink products (n 20 225) were categorised into scoring levels using criteria for the Institute of Medicine (IOM) three-star system and the five-star Australian Health Star Rating (HSR). The effectiveness of these systems to categorise foods in accordance with Australian Dietary Guidelines was explored. Setting: The study was conducted in Australia, using a comprehensive food database. Subjects: Packaged food and drink products (n 20 225) available in Australia. Results: Using the IOM ...


The Role Of Personalised Choice In Decision Support: A Randomized Controlled Trial Of An Online Decision Aid For Prostate Cancer Screening, Glenn P. Salkeld, Michelle Cunich, Jack Dowie, Kirsten Howard, Manish I. Patel, Graham Mann, Wendy Lipworth Jan 2016

The Role Of Personalised Choice In Decision Support: A Randomized Controlled Trial Of An Online Decision Aid For Prostate Cancer Screening, Glenn P. Salkeld, Michelle Cunich, Jack Dowie, Kirsten Howard, Manish I. Patel, Graham Mann, Wendy Lipworth

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Importance Decision support tools can assist people to apply population-based evidence on benefits and harms to individual health decisions. A key question is whether "personalising" choice within decisions aids leads to better decision quality. Objective To assess the effect of personalising the content of a decision aid for prostate cancer screening using the Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) test. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting Australia. Participants 1,970 men aged 40-69 years were approached to participate in the trial. Intervention 1,447 men were randomly allocated to either a standard decision aid with a fixed set of five attributes or a ...


Gendered Dynamics Of Wildland Firefighting In Australia, Christine Eriksen, Gordon R. Waitt, Carrie Wilkinson Jan 2016

Gendered Dynamics Of Wildland Firefighting In Australia, Christine Eriksen, Gordon R. Waitt, Carrie Wilkinson

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

This article examines the gendered dynamics of wildland firefighting through analysis of employment statistics and in-depth interviews with employees of the National Parks and Wildlife Service in New South Wales, Australia. The statistics suggest increased gender equality for women following the affirmative gender politics of the 1990s in a previously male-dominated workplace. However, we argue these statistics mask how some patterns of practice surrounding fire management continue to reproduce a gendered workplace. Turning to the concept of hegemonic masculinity, we explore the ongoing gendered assumptions of this workplace and identify those that prove most resistant to change around bodies, masculinity ...


Efficiency Of Respirator Filter Media Against Diesel Particulate Matter: A Comparison Study Using Two Diesel Particulate Sources, Kerrie Burton, Jane L. Whitelaw, Alison L. Jones, Brian Davies Jan 2016

Efficiency Of Respirator Filter Media Against Diesel Particulate Matter: A Comparison Study Using Two Diesel Particulate Sources, Kerrie Burton, Jane L. Whitelaw, Alison L. Jones, Brian Davies

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Diesel engines have been a mainstay within many industries since the early 1900s. Exposure to diesel particulate matter (DPM) is a major issue in many industrial workplaces given the potential for serious health impacts to exposed workers; including the potential for lung cancer and adverse irritant and cardiovascular effects. Personal respiratory protective devices are an accepted safety measure to mitigate worker exposure against the potentially damaging health impacts of DPM. To be protective, they need to act as effective filters against carbon and other particulates. In Australia, the filtering efficiency of respiratory protective devices is determined by challenging test filter ...


Correlates Of Children's Objectively Measured Physical Activity And Sedentary Behavior In Early Childhood Education And Care Services: A Systematic Review, Karen Tonge, Rachel A. Jones, Anthony D. Okely Jan 2016

Correlates Of Children's Objectively Measured Physical Activity And Sedentary Behavior In Early Childhood Education And Care Services: A Systematic Review, Karen Tonge, Rachel A. Jones, Anthony D. Okely

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Objective: To systematically review the correlates of physical activity and sedentary behavior among children in Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) services. Appropriate levels of physical activity and sedentary behavior are important to promote in ECEC services. Methods: A systematic search of 8 databases identified 27 studies published between 1992 and 2015 that met the inclusion criteria. The data were collected and analyzed in 2014 and 2015, and variables were categorized using a Social Ecological Framework. Results: Sixty-six variables were identified. The domains of child characteristics (18 studies) and physical environmental factors (17 studies) were most consistently studied, and, for ...


An Integrated Model Of Staff Education And Service Support To Strengthen The Efficacy Of Technology-Based Crisis Services, Taneile Kitchingman, Peter Caputi, Ian G. Wilson, Alan Woodward Jan 2016

An Integrated Model Of Staff Education And Service Support To Strengthen The Efficacy Of Technology-Based Crisis Services, Taneile Kitchingman, Peter Caputi, Ian G. Wilson, Alan Woodward

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Paper presented at the National Suicide Prevention Conference, 24-27 July 2016, Canberra, Australia.

Within Australia, non-clinical telephone and online crisis support services provide readily accessible support without the requirement of referral. Research shows that up to one third of callers to crisis lines and half of all visitors to crisis chat services may be suicidal at the time of contact. Research also shows that contact with these services reduces caller suicidality and facilitates engagement with necessary intervention. The number of contacts to crisis support services in Australia is increasing. An increase in contacts to technology-based crisis services highlights the need ...


'Physical Activity 4 Everyone' School-Based Intervention To Prevent Decline In Adolescent Physical Activity Levels: 12 Month (Mid-Intervention) Report On A Cluster Randomised Trial, Rachel Sutherland, Elizabeth Campbell, David R. Lubans, Philip J. Morgan, Anthony D. Okely, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Jarrod Wiese, Karen Gillham, Jenna Hollis, John Wiggers Jan 2016

'Physical Activity 4 Everyone' School-Based Intervention To Prevent Decline In Adolescent Physical Activity Levels: 12 Month (Mid-Intervention) Report On A Cluster Randomised Trial, Rachel Sutherland, Elizabeth Campbell, David R. Lubans, Philip J. Morgan, Anthony D. Okely, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Jarrod Wiese, Karen Gillham, Jenna Hollis, John Wiggers

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Background: Adolescence is a recognised period of physical activity decline, particularly among low-income communities. We report the 12-month (midpoint) effects of a 2-year multicomponent physical activity intervention implemented in disadvantaged secondary schools. Methods: A cluster randomised trial was undertaken in 10 secondary schools located in disadvantaged areas in New South Wales, Australia. Students in Grade 7 were recruited, with follow-up in Grade 8. The intervention was guided by socioecological theory and included seven physical activity strategies, and six implementation adoption strategies. The primary outcome was mean minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per day assessed using Actigraph GT3X accelerometers. Outcome ...


Gesturing During Mental Problem Solving Reduces Eye Movements, Especially For Individuals With Lower Visual Working Memory Capacity, Wim T. Pouw, Myrto-Foteini Mavilidi, Tamara Van Gog, Fred Paas Jan 2016

Gesturing During Mental Problem Solving Reduces Eye Movements, Especially For Individuals With Lower Visual Working Memory Capacity, Wim T. Pouw, Myrto-Foteini Mavilidi, Tamara Van Gog, Fred Paas

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Non-communicative hand gestures have been found to benefit problem-solving performance. These gestures seem to compensate for limited internal cognitive capacities, such as visual working memory capacity. Yet, it is not clear how gestures might perform this cognitive function. One hypothesis is that gesturing is a means to spatially index mental simulations, thereby reducing the need for visually projecting the mental simulation onto the visual presentation of the task. If that hypothesis is correct, less eye movements should be made when participants gesture during problem solving than when they do not gesture. We therefore used mobile eye tracking to investigate the ...


Evaluation Report 2015: Investigating The Effectiveness Of The In2uni Year 12 University Preparation Program, Sarah Elizabeth O'Shea, Valerie Harwood, Steven J. Howard, Ken Cliff, Janine Delahunty Jan 2016

Evaluation Report 2015: Investigating The Effectiveness Of The In2uni Year 12 University Preparation Program, Sarah Elizabeth O'Shea, Valerie Harwood, Steven J. Howard, Ken Cliff, Janine Delahunty

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

In2Uni's Year 12 University Preparation Program (UPP), which commenced in 2014, is an innovative program for students in their HSC year working towards an ATAR. It targets schools in UOW catchment areas, and particularly those identified as being from the 39 low-ICSEA (Index of Community and Socio-Educational Advantage) areas. Students must meet eligibility criteria, one being that their academic performance is not currently on the trajectory to meet university entry requirements (In2Uni, My Way, 2016). Once accepted into UPP, students attend on-campus study sessions for two hours per week over a 20- week period from April to September. The ...


Navigating The Knowledge Sets Of Older Learners: Exploring The Concept Of Experiential Capital Amongst First-In-Family Mature Age Students, Sarah Elizabeth O'Shea Jan 2016

Navigating The Knowledge Sets Of Older Learners: Exploring The Concept Of Experiential Capital Amongst First-In-Family Mature Age Students, Sarah Elizabeth O'Shea

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

This paper is based upon research with university students who were first in their family to come to university. The studies sought to explore how attending university impacted upon both the learners and their families, particularly the intergenerational implications of this attendance. Drawing on in-depth interviews conducted with older university students, this paper will focus on how this mature cohort articulated the ways in which they drew upon life and work experiences in their transition to university. The research indicates that these learners had access to additional capitals in the higher education environment including what has been termed as 'experiential ...