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Journal of Educational Controversy

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Full-Text Articles in Education

Allusive, Elusive, Or Illusive? An Examination Of Apologies For The Atlantic Slave Trade And Their Pedagogical Utility, Esther J. Kim, Anthony Brown, Heath Robinson, Justin Krueger Jan 2020

Allusive, Elusive, Or Illusive? An Examination Of Apologies For The Atlantic Slave Trade And Their Pedagogical Utility, Esther J. Kim, Anthony Brown, Heath Robinson, Justin Krueger

Journal of Educational Controversy

This critical essay explores the topic of slavery within the context of public apologies.

Drawing from both the historical lens of cultural memory (Le Goff, 1977/1992) and the critical race theory construct of interest convergence (Bell, 1987), the authors offer critical examination of the following questions: (1) Where do collective apologies fit in the narrative of slavery in the US? (2) What affordances might they offer to the social studies at the intersection of curriculum, instruction and the historical memory of enslavement? (3) What do apologies for slavery in the present potentially reveal about contemporary social and political relations ...


Making Sense Of And With “Profound Regret”: Howard County Board Of Education’S Apology For A Racially Segregated Public School System, Rachel Garver, Benjamin Nienass Jan 2020

Making Sense Of And With “Profound Regret”: Howard County Board Of Education’S Apology For A Racially Segregated Public School System, Rachel Garver, Benjamin Nienass

Journal of Educational Controversy

In November 2012, the Board of Education of Howard County, Maryland approved a proclamation that expressed “profound regret that the Howard County Public School System maintained segregated and unequal public schools both prior, and subsequent to” Brown v. Board of Education. The proclamation describes Howard County’s slow response to comply with the 1954 decision, such that the school system was not officially desegregated until eleven years later in 1965. Through the analysis of stakeholder interviews and board meetings, we explore the various ways and the extent to which the Board of Howard County’s apology was bestowed with meaning ...


A Case For Unforgiveness As A Legitimate Moral Response To Historical Wrongs, Hollman Lozano Jan 2020

A Case For Unforgiveness As A Legitimate Moral Response To Historical Wrongs, Hollman Lozano

Journal of Educational Controversy

Abstract:

The emergence of forgiveness as the preferred mechanism through which historical wrongs are addressed within reconciliation discourses has meant that for the people who cannot forgive or will not forgive, there are no alternatives other than insisting on forgiveness until it hopefully one day arrives. As such, the point of unforgiveness is to constitute an agentic space where the people who cannot forgive can articulate their stance in ways that not only allow them to articulate their resistance to the injunction to forgive, but also constitute alternative spaces whereby they can articulate their stance in inclusive ways. If we ...


Author's Response To Book Review, Kerry Burch Jan 2020

Author's Response To Book Review, Kerry Burch

Journal of Educational Controversy

This is an invited response by the author to a review of his book, Jefferson’s Revolutionary Theory and the Reconstruction of Educational Purpose, published in this issue.


Review Of Jefferson’S Revolutionary Theory And The Reconstruction Of Educational Purpose By Kerry T. Burch, Tony Decesare Jan 2020

Review Of Jefferson’S Revolutionary Theory And The Reconstruction Of Educational Purpose By Kerry T. Burch, Tony Decesare

Journal of Educational Controversy

This is a review of Kerry T. Burch's book Jefferson’s Revolutionary Theory and the Reconstruction of Educational Purpose.


How Historical Context Matters For Fourth And Fifth Generation Japanese Americans, L. Erika Saito Jan 2020

How Historical Context Matters For Fourth And Fifth Generation Japanese Americans, L. Erika Saito

Journal of Educational Controversy

Japanese Americans have a longstanding history in the U.S.-- comprising of more than five consecutive generations. Yet generational research on this ethnic group is understudied (Meredith, Wenger, Liu, Harada, & Kahn, 2000; Pang, 2007). By connecting the historical experiences of previous generations of Japanese Americans to the present, findings on how history has impacted this population can be applied in other ethnic multi-generational groups in the United States.

An Ethnic Identity & Generational Status Model was developed by the author that was influenced by Jean Phinney (1990), Handlin (1951), Mannheim (1927), and Matsuo (1992) to support the varied roles that contribute to ethnic ...


Developing A Collaborative Partnership Between A College Of Education And An Elementary School: An Overview Of A Six-Year Grant Funded Project, Susan Donnelly Jan 2018

Developing A Collaborative Partnership Between A College Of Education And An Elementary School: An Overview Of A Six-Year Grant Funded Project, Susan Donnelly

Journal of Educational Controversy

This introductory article will provide an overview of a state funded project to develop a collaborative partnership between the Western Washington University Elementary Education Department and an elementary school in a district with high levels of poverty and English learners. It will describe the history, the aims and goals, and the major results of the six-year project and provide readers with a context for the other articles that appear in this issue of the Journal of Educational Controversy. In the other articles, the authors, who also participated in the partnership, describe their personal involvement in particular aspects of the multi-faceted ...


Using A Place-Based Approach In Preparing Community Teachers For High-Need Schools, Joanne Carney, Marilyn Chu, Susan Donnelly, Marsha Riddle Buly, David Carroll Jan 2018

Using A Place-Based Approach In Preparing Community Teachers For High-Need Schools, Joanne Carney, Marilyn Chu, Susan Donnelly, Marsha Riddle Buly, David Carroll

Journal of Educational Controversy

This case study describes actions and outcomes of a school-university partnership to better prepare teachers for high-need schools with large numbers of English Learners. Using a place-based approach to preparing community teachers, preservice and inservice teachers and teacher educators collaboratively learned how to work with families and community members to address student needs and developed core practices attuned to the socio-cultural context. The partnership also established a pathway to teaching for bilingual/bicultural students from the community. Data are derived from semi-structured interviews, focus groups, intern and teacher surveys, journal reflections, and a statewide teacher employment database.


Three Cases: Bridging The University-School-Community Divide Through Collaborative Learning And Innovative Uses Of Educational Technology, Joanne M. Carney, Paula Dagnon, Martha Thornburgh, Lori Sadzewicz, Chloe Unruh Jan 2018

Three Cases: Bridging The University-School-Community Divide Through Collaborative Learning And Innovative Uses Of Educational Technology, Joanne M. Carney, Paula Dagnon, Martha Thornburgh, Lori Sadzewicz, Chloe Unruh

Journal of Educational Controversy

The following three articles are presented together because each is a case study exploring a common theme: How the cultural and systemic differences between school and university might be bridged in partnership, as educators work together with community members to educate and promote the wellbeing of children. The cases show how personal relationships, collaborative learning, and innovative uses of technology can be fostered by “hanging out and joining in.”

Each of the cases has three levels of significance, which is in keeping with the nested contexts of partnership work: 1) teaching and learning with elementary students and their families, 2 ...


Moving From Toolkits To Relationships: Family Engagement For Systems Change, Marilyn T. Chu, John Korsmo Jan 2018

Moving From Toolkits To Relationships: Family Engagement For Systems Change, Marilyn T. Chu, John Korsmo

Journal of Educational Controversy

Abstract

This article presents the development and challenges involved in one school-university partnership over a four-year period, to learn what is needed to support teachers, future teachers and schools to be able to gather, understand, and use family knowledge in long term, mutually meaningful, and co-designed family engagement efforts. Here we explore impact on teacher-candidate, teacher, administrator, and university faculty understanding in one high poverty, majority Latino, rural elementary school in the northwestern USA. The processes and structures involved in family-school co-construction of informal and formal family engagement experiences are detailed in this case study. The account details the inclusion ...


About The Authors, Kathryn Merwin Jan 2017

About The Authors, Kathryn Merwin

Journal of Educational Controversy

About the Authors


Black Lives Matter And The Education Industrial Complex: A Special Issue Of The Journal Of Educational Controversy, Teri A. Mcmurtry-Chubb, William Lyne Jan 2017

Black Lives Matter And The Education Industrial Complex: A Special Issue Of The Journal Of Educational Controversy, Teri A. Mcmurtry-Chubb, William Lyne

Journal of Educational Controversy

Our volume seeks to illustrate specific classrooms and the larger invisible forces that structure the U.S. education industrial complex.


A Critical Race Theory Analysis Of Post-Ferguson Critical Incidents Across Ecological Levels Of Academia, Aurora Chang, Sabina Neugebauer, Daniel Birmingham Jan 2017

A Critical Race Theory Analysis Of Post-Ferguson Critical Incidents Across Ecological Levels Of Academia, Aurora Chang, Sabina Neugebauer, Daniel Birmingham

Journal of Educational Controversy

In this article, we explore our experience walking into the academic school year eager and ready for the challenge of taking up the killing of Michael Brown and the events that followed in Ferguson as a catalyst for important conversations around structural injustice. Through exploration of critical incidents (Hamilton, 2004), we review how our attempts to open dialogue were met with defensiveness and a discourse that relegates the responsibility of engaging in conversations about race and power to educators of color. Echoing Pollock, Bocala, Deckman, and Dickstein-Staub (2015), we found that teachers at all levels may resist the ‘diversity’ aspect ...


Cocaine And College: How Black Lives Matter In U.S. Public Higher Education, Bill Lyne Jan 2017

Cocaine And College: How Black Lives Matter In U.S. Public Higher Education, Bill Lyne

Journal of Educational Controversy

Taking the Black Panthers' call for relevant education as its starting point, this article looks at the recent history of race and higher education to put the Back Lives Matter movement into historical perspective and ask whether Black lives can ever really matter in U.S. mainstream education.


The Intersection Of White Supremacy And The Education Industrial Complex: An Analysis Of #Blacklivesmatter And The Criminalization Of People With Disabilities, Brittany A. Aronson, Mildred Boveda Jan 2017

The Intersection Of White Supremacy And The Education Industrial Complex: An Analysis Of #Blacklivesmatter And The Criminalization Of People With Disabilities, Brittany A. Aronson, Mildred Boveda

Journal of Educational Controversy

In this article, in answering the question do Black Lives Matter in the U.S. education industrial complex, we begin with a description of how the education industrial serves white supremacy. In our discussion of anti-blackness and racial bias, we also acknowledge the racialization of disabilities and the historical intersections between racial oppression and the marginalization of people with disabilities. More specifically, we examine the discourse and reticence about markers of differences (e.g., race, gender, ability status, race, and class) and interrogate how social categorizations are manipulated and co-opted to repurpose differences in ways that serve the education industrial ...


Stories Of Social Justice Educators And Raising Children In The Face Of Injustice, James Wright, Amanda U. Potterton Jan 2017

Stories Of Social Justice Educators And Raising Children In The Face Of Injustice, James Wright, Amanda U. Potterton

Journal of Educational Controversy

This article examines life stories of the authors, who are parents and social justice scholars and educators from different races and backgrounds. The authors consider the emotional process of personally and collectively coping with and navigating parenting and sharing critical truths with their children in the current social, political, and cultural environment and in light of recent assaults on communities of color. They employ life history methodology to explicitly continue a critical conversation that was started by Matias and Montoya (2015) about Critical Race Parenting, and they encourage other scholars, particularly those who are parents, to think about, and articulate ...


The Revolution Will Be Live: Examining Educational (In)Justice Through The Lens Of Black Lives Matter, Amy Jo Samuels, Gregory L. Samuels, Brandon Haas Jan 2017

The Revolution Will Be Live: Examining Educational (In)Justice Through The Lens Of Black Lives Matter, Amy Jo Samuels, Gregory L. Samuels, Brandon Haas

Journal of Educational Controversy

The article explores current sociopolitical implications of race through the lens of Black Lives Matter. In highlighting critical incidents in the movement and connecting to related events of historical significance, we establish parallels to emphasize the persistence of bias, race-based oppression, and injustice. The article focuses on established power structures and explores inequity, oppression, and sociopolitical contradictions by examining institutionalized racism. We emphasize how deficit perceptions, racist ideologies, and silence on racism are dangerous and must be challenged to foster action, advocacy, and change.


Going To College: Why Black Lives Matter Too, Raquel Farmer-Hinton Jan 2017

Going To College: Why Black Lives Matter Too, Raquel Farmer-Hinton

Journal of Educational Controversy

In this article, I share why centering Blackness is critical in implementing college readiness for all. By utilizing the practices of high school leaders, counselors, and teachers at five predominantly Black college readiness for all high schools, I explore key activities, instructional approaches, and support systems that are integral to Black students' college readiness. I present two themes: mission intentionality and doing whatever it takes. These findings are also coupled with lessons learned from existing scholarship on non-selective college preparatory schools and college readiness issues in urban communities. Lastly, in reflecting upon the qualitative findings from the five high schools ...


Post-Trayvon Stress Disorder (Ptsd): A Theoretical Analysis Of The Criminalization Of African American Students In U.S. Schools, Marcia J. Watson-Vandiver Jan 2017

Post-Trayvon Stress Disorder (Ptsd): A Theoretical Analysis Of The Criminalization Of African American Students In U.S. Schools, Marcia J. Watson-Vandiver

Journal of Educational Controversy

This article examines the historical and contemporary intersections of race in education. Specifically, this article explores the African American schooling experience in relation to the Black Lives Matter movement. Although the Brown vs. Board of Education [1954] decision promised more racial cohesion in public schools, many African American students still experience widespread disparities (Kozol, 2005). With African American students receiving three times the number of suspensions or expulsions (Lewis, Butler, Bonner, & Joubert, 2010), it is imperative to explore the undeniable relationship between public schooling and the criminal justice system. To that end, it is important to consider ways that U ...


Magical Black Girls In The Education Industrial Complex: Making Visible The Wounds Of Invisibility, Teri A. Mcmurtry-Chubb Jan 2017

Magical Black Girls In The Education Industrial Complex: Making Visible The Wounds Of Invisibility, Teri A. Mcmurtry-Chubb

Journal of Educational Controversy

Black girls in public school are constantly exposed to physical violence, racialized gender hostility and harassment, and hate speech. Yet, the national narrative perpetuates the belief that Black boys are the main targets of such behaviors. This narrative renders Black girls invisible, and normalizes their treatment as another beam in the framework of white supremacy. This article addresses Black girls' invisibility first creatively, though the African diasporic rhetorical practice of storytelling. It then turns to an exploration of Fennell v. Marion Independent School District, where three sisters were subjected to a racially hostile educational environment in Marion, TX. The article ...


Exclusionary Discipline In New Jersey: The Relationship Between Black Teachers And Black Students, Randy Rakeem Miller Sr. Jan 2017

Exclusionary Discipline In New Jersey: The Relationship Between Black Teachers And Black Students, Randy Rakeem Miller Sr.

Journal of Educational Controversy

There are a host of variables that affect the disciplinary outcomes of African-American students, for example, poverty rates and students with special needs. The variables of interest here are African-American teachers and/or teachers who have identified themselves on record as African-American and gender of those same race teachers. Race and gender impact both how students are instructed and disciplined. It is the intention of this paper to contribute to the empirical scholarship on the impact teacher race has on the education of Black students in New Jersey Public Schools. More specifically, this paper will investigate the relationship between Black ...


Schools And The No-Prison Phenomenon: Anti-Blackness And Secondary Policing In The Black Lives Matter Era, Lynette Parker Jan 2017

Schools And The No-Prison Phenomenon: Anti-Blackness And Secondary Policing In The Black Lives Matter Era, Lynette Parker

Journal of Educational Controversy

Black boys in schools are often labeled as discipline problems, criminalized and overclassified into special education programs. This article describes the ways in which current practices of labeling and disciplining Black boys have far-reaching impacts on their lives beyond school. It explores the ways Black boys, who are surveilled and criminalized in school, are further victimized when school records are used to characterize them as deviant as a way of justifying violence against them. Drawing upon anti-blackness as a theoretical framework, the author explores the 9-1-1 transcripts in the cases of Trayvon Martin and Tamir Rice to clarify the role ...


About The Authors Jan 2016

About The Authors

Journal of Educational Controversy

About the Authors


Good Intentions Gone Awry: Education Policy And Paradox Of Consequences In Rural Ethnic China, Jinting Wu Jan 2016

Good Intentions Gone Awry: Education Policy And Paradox Of Consequences In Rural Ethnic China, Jinting Wu

Journal of Educational Controversy

This paper provides a situated critique of how evidence-based, “best practices”-oriented research can result in unanticipated consequences and perpetuate a self-fulfilling prophesy at the expense of deeper understanding of educational problems. I structure the paper along two analytical steps. First, I explore the sociology of unintended consequences through German Sociologist Max Weber and his contemporary critic Mohamed Cherkaoui. Second, I draw from an ethnographic study in rural ethnic communities of Southwest China to illustrate how best intentions at providing free compulsory education go awry, and how the controversial policy both fails and succeeds in fabricating its intended outcome. The ...


Big Data And Technologies Of Self, Bernadette Baker Jan 2016

Big Data And Technologies Of Self, Bernadette Baker

Journal of Educational Controversy

The entry of Big Data into the educational field has generated noticeable binary reactions and a recycling of criticisms already directed at the quantification of reality, datafication in the social sciences, standardization in education, and neoliberalism in the West. This paper reapproaches Big Data’s entry into education from a curriculum studies perspective, which deploys interdisciplinary approaches from philosophy, history, sociology and politics of knowledge and wisdom. The analysis of key definitional debates, binary reactions, and systematization are considered from the point of view of historically shifting technologies of self, as core conditions of possibility for the controversies that emerge ...


Is “Best Practices” Research In Education Insufficient Or Even Misdirected? An Issue Dedicated To John G. Richardson, Lorraine Kasprisin Jan 2016

Is “Best Practices” Research In Education Insufficient Or Even Misdirected? An Issue Dedicated To John G. Richardson, Lorraine Kasprisin

Journal of Educational Controversy

Editorial and Dedication for Volume 11, Issue 1

Is “Best Practices” Research in Education Insufficient or even Misdirected?

AN ISSUE DEDICATED TO JOHN G. RICHARDSON


Introduction To The Special Issue Of The Journal Of Educational Controversy, John G. Richardson Jan 2016

Introduction To The Special Issue Of The Journal Of Educational Controversy, John G. Richardson

Journal of Educational Controversy

This issue addresses the uneasy relation between 'best practices' in educational research and the consequences that often follow from efforts to implement practices deemed best. This relation is often complicated by the social phenomenon long recognized as "unintended consequences". It is proposed that controversies in education, as well as practices advanced as best, are shaped as the consequences -subsequently revealed as the very product of the good intentions that underlie prevailing theory and methods.


A Violence Of “Best Practice” And Unintended Consequences?: Domestic Violence And The Making Of A Disordered Subjectivity, Tracey Pyscher Jan 2016

A Violence Of “Best Practice” And Unintended Consequences?: Domestic Violence And The Making Of A Disordered Subjectivity, Tracey Pyscher

Journal of Educational Controversy

Often, efforts by schools to standardize marginalized children with histories of domestic violence have alarming effects. More recent efforts of standardization typically find a sustained existence in the discourse of “best” practices predicated upon a religious-like adherence to behavioral data driven frameworks. This article traces how children and youth with histories of domestic violence (or HDV youth) navigate and resist deficit laden school subjectivities shaped by special education discourses of medicalization and pathologization. In one case study, I spell out how an elementary school created and maintained an HDV child’s EBD (emotional behavioral disordered) subjectivity with detrimental effects. The ...


Emergent Student Practices: Unintended Consequences In A Dialogic, Collaborative Classroom, Anne E. Crampton Jan 2016

Emergent Student Practices: Unintended Consequences In A Dialogic, Collaborative Classroom, Anne E. Crampton

Journal of Educational Controversy

It’s a commonplace to decry the folly of “best practices” in education. They make many practitioners and researchers twitch, fearing that the good-- or even just decent--practice will soon be setting the tempo in the steady march toward standardization. The argument against best practices, then, is the argument against one-size-fits-all pedagogy. Instructional practices must come with a necessary humility, based on situating students within the picture, with particular attention to with histories of institutional and societal othering and marginalization. Good practices cannot be delivered or imposed, and therefore, if successful, they become suggestions or starting points carried out with ...


Crowding New Public Management Off The University’S Horizon Of Expectations, Michael Schapira Feb 2015

Crowding New Public Management Off The University’S Horizon Of Expectations, Michael Schapira

Journal of Educational Controversy

This article is a response to Asger Sørensen’s vivid example of how neo-liberal university reform has subjected Danish universities to New Public Management. Sørensen effectively shows the noxious effects of NPM by discussing the infamous Koldau case, where newly empowered rectors, who served as centralized arbiters of university affairs, superseded academic decision-making. He concludes that one reason these cases have not been met with resistance by faculty is that they are paralyzed by radically conflicting normative visions of the university. In this article I respond to Sørensen by suggesting that conflicting normative visions need not be a disempowering condition ...