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Full-Text Articles in Social Work

Future Orientation Of Adolescents In Foster Care: Relationship To Trauma, Mental Health, And Hiv Risk Behaviors, Peter Cabrera, Wendy Auslander, Michael Polgar Jan 2009

Future Orientation Of Adolescents In Foster Care: Relationship To Trauma, Mental Health, And Hiv Risk Behaviors, Peter Cabrera, Wendy Auslander, Michael Polgar

Elián P. Cabrera-Nguyen

Future orientation has been found to protect against risk behaviors in adolescents from diverse backgrounds. However, no studies have specifically examined future orientation as a potential protective factor against HIV risk behaviors in foster care adolescents. In this study, 343 foster care adolescents were interviewed about their future orientation, mental health, trauma histories, and cognitions related to HIV risk behaviors. Results indicated variability in future orientation, but there were no significant differences by race, gender, and age. Future orientation was significantly associated with mental health, trauma, HIV-related knowledge, attitudes, behavioral intentions, and number of sexual intercourse partners. Furthermore, externalizing behaviors ...


An Examination Of The Persistence Of The Residual Child Welfare System In The United States: Addressing Charges Of Radical Theoretical Myopia With Implications For Social Work Practice, Peter Cabrera Jan 2009

An Examination Of The Persistence Of The Residual Child Welfare System In The United States: Addressing Charges Of Radical Theoretical Myopia With Implications For Social Work Practice, Peter Cabrera

Elián P. Cabrera-Nguyen

The United States follows what has been termed a residual approach to its public child welfare system. This article describes the residual model and contrasts it with the policies of other industrialized nations. It also explores the causes and persistence of the residual model in the United States through the lens of structural-functionalist theory. By doing so, this article attempts to respond to critics of structural social work who maintain that it is overly reliant on conflict theory and has nothing to offer in terms of distinct practice methods. Suggestions for a structurally informed social work practice are made.