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Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Caught In A Poverty Trap? Testing For Single Vs. Multiple Equilibrium Models Of Growth, Cameron Shelton, Francisco R. Rodriguez Jan 2012

Caught In A Poverty Trap? Testing For Single Vs. Multiple Equilibrium Models Of Growth, Cameron Shelton, Francisco R. Rodriguez

CMC Faculty Publications and Research

We look for permanent effects to per capita GDP from exogenous, temporary shocks. Our shocks are temporary changes to the export revenues of small, open economies. We find no evidence that even the largest of these temporary shocks, in excess of 9.7% of GDP, produce permanent effects to the growth path of per capita GDP. The inability to reject a single-equilibrium world with shocks of this magnitude suggests that multiple-equilibria, if they exist, are too widely separated to be policy-relevant. Current aid initiatives, which are of a similar magnitude, are not likely to deliver transition to a higher growth ...


A Study In Market Micromanagement: The Asymmetrical Effects Of The 2008 Short Sale Ban On Stocks With And Without Traded Options, James W. Weyerhaeuser Jan 2012

A Study In Market Micromanagement: The Asymmetrical Effects Of The 2008 Short Sale Ban On Stocks With And Without Traded Options, James W. Weyerhaeuser

CMC Senior Theses

This study provides an empirical analysis of the 2008 short sale ban. The evidence suggests that the presence of tradable options plays a crucial role in determining the effect of a short sale ban. Results show that if there are no traded options on a stock, the short sale ban brought abnormal returns of roughly +8%. However if there are traded options on a stock, the market maker exemptions nullify the positive effects of the ban. Furthermore, for the banned stocks that do experience positive abnormal returns during the ban, the lifting of the ban causes a prompt reversal of ...


The Effect Of The Establishment Of The Day Clearing Branch On Trading Costs: A Look At The Nyse In 1920, Samuel W. Wong Jan 2012

The Effect Of The Establishment Of The Day Clearing Branch On Trading Costs: A Look At The Nyse In 1920, Samuel W. Wong

CMC Senior Theses

As a financial institution that clears and settles payments for equity and other securities, a clearinghouse essentially reduces the counterparty risk. It diminishes the risk of one party failing to meet its obligations, and makes markets more efficient through netting. This paper examines the impact of the establishment of the Day Clearing Branch on April 26, 1920, which allowed the NYSE Clearinghouse to net cash values and clear loans, supposedly resulting in savings in banking, time, and labor. The common and preferred equity securities that traded on the NYSE during the year 1920 were analyzed. The effect on bid-ask spreads ...


Finding Profitability Of Technical Trading Rules In Emerging Market Exchange Traded Funds, Austin P. Hallett Jan 2012

Finding Profitability Of Technical Trading Rules In Emerging Market Exchange Traded Funds, Austin P. Hallett

CMC Senior Theses

This thesis further investigates the effectiveness of 15 variable moving average strategies that mimic the trading rules used in the study by Brock, Lakonishok, and LeBaron (1992). Instead of applying these strategies to developed markets, unique characteristics of emerging markets offer opportunity to investors that warrant further research. Before transaction costs, all 15 variable moving average strategies outperform the naïve benchmark strategy of buying and holding different emerging market ETF's over the volatile period of 858 trading days. However, the variable moving averages perform poorly in the "bubble" market cycle. In fact, sell signals become more unprofitable than buy ...


Can Online Sentiment Help Predict Dow Jones Industrial Average Returns?, Aria K. Krumwiede Jan 2012

Can Online Sentiment Help Predict Dow Jones Industrial Average Returns?, Aria K. Krumwiede

CMC Senior Theses

In this paper, we explore the relationship between a Global Mood Time Series, provided by Wall Street Birds, and the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) from April 2011 to December 2011. My econometric results show that there is no long run equilibrium relationship between the level of global mood and the level of the DJIA. These results apply to the whole period, as well as in the six-month subperiods. Furthermore, daily changes in global mood do not Granger cause DJIA returns. However, changes in global mood do appear to be useful in forecasting the volatility of the DJIA, and my ...


The Effects Of The Media On The Discrepancy Between Gaap And Pro Forma Earnings, Peter Schock Jan 2012

The Effects Of The Media On The Discrepancy Between Gaap And Pro Forma Earnings, Peter Schock

CMC Senior Theses

This study seeks to find if there is a significant relationship between the amount of media coverage focused on public companies in the United States and the difference between GAAP financial performance and analyst-adjusted estimates of financial performance. I will answer this question by testing this difference among S&P 500 companies, as well as companies within that index as identified by a certain industry.


Aggregated Versus Disaggregated Forward Looking Information: Effects On Risk Taking, Rishabh Parekh Jan 2012

Aggregated Versus Disaggregated Forward Looking Information: Effects On Risk Taking, Rishabh Parekh

CMC Senior Theses

In previous research, aggregation of returns has been found as a way to counteract the risk averse behavior that is the result of investors' myopia. This paper expands the study of aggregation by analyzing its effect on forward looking probabilities. Namely, through the disaggregation of future information, subjects become myopic and trade with varying risk preferences. In an experimental market, subjects trading securities with disaggregated forward looking information are found to 'buy high and sell low', while subjects trading the same securities, but with aggregated information, trade with more consistent risk preferences.


The Effect Of Executive Compensation On Firm Performance Through The Dot-Com Bubble, Maxwell J. Chambers Jan 2012

The Effect Of Executive Compensation On Firm Performance Through The Dot-Com Bubble, Maxwell J. Chambers

CMC Senior Theses

This thesis examines firm performance through the dot-com bubble through the lens of executive compensation. Hypotheses based on the theoretical literature of Bolton, Scheinkman and Xiong (2006) as well as Bertrand and Mullainathan (2001) in regards to management compensation in a speculative bubble motivate three regression models with differing market-cap-growth based dependent variables and specific compensation variables. Regression analyses test the models using public compensation and security data from S&P's Execucomp and Compustat databases. Synthesizing regression results show that stock option vesting schedules and executives' status on the board of directors may significantly affect firm performance through the ...


The Potential Application Of Weather Derivatives To Hedge Harvest Value Risk In The Champagne Region Of France, Andrew W. Yandell Jan 2012

The Potential Application Of Weather Derivatives To Hedge Harvest Value Risk In The Champagne Region Of France, Andrew W. Yandell

CMC Senior Theses

In Champagne, France grape growers and and winemakers work together to make the world's most iconic sparkling wine. Part of what makes Champagne so celebrated is its reputation for constant quality: only the best grapes are used to make wine. In poor vintage years, grape growers sell less grapes to winemakers; poor vintages are the result of bad weather. This presents the opportunity for grape growers to hedge the risk of poor weather and resulting lower harvest values with weather derivatives. This study explores the potential for grape growers to trade them to effectively hedge against low harvest values ...