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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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University of Wollongong

Review

2017

Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences - Papers: Part B

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Review On Design And Control Aspects Of Robotic Shoulder Rehabilitation Orthoses, Aibek Niyetkaliyev, Shahid Hussain, Mergen Hmcgill University, Ghayesh, Gursel Alici Jan 2017

Review On Design And Control Aspects Of Robotic Shoulder Rehabilitation Orthoses, Aibek Niyetkaliyev, Shahid Hussain, Mergen Hmcgill University, Ghayesh, Gursel Alici

Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences - Papers: Part B

Robotic rehabilitation devices are more frequently used for the physical therapy of people with upper limb weakness, which is the most common type of stroke-induced disability. Rehabilitation robots can provide customized, prolonged, intensive, and repetitive training sessions for patients with neurological impairments. In most cases, the robotic exoskeletons have to be aligned with the human joints and provide natural arm movements. This is a challenging task to achieve for one of the most biomechanically complex joints of human body, i.e., the shoulder. Therefore, specific considerations have been made in the development of various existing robotic shoulder rehabilitation orthoses. Different ...


Game-Based Interventions And Their Impact On Dementia: A Narrative Review, Jiaying Zheng, Xueping Chen, Ping Yu Jan 2017

Game-Based Interventions And Their Impact On Dementia: A Narrative Review, Jiaying Zheng, Xueping Chen, Ping Yu

Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences - Papers: Part B

Objective: The aim of this review was to examine the efficacy of game-based interventions for people with dementia. Methods: Seven studies that met the inclusion criteria were found in four databases. Their interventions and key findings were analysed and synthesised. Results: Game-based interventions for people with dementia are showing promise for improving cognition, coordination and behavioural and psychological symptoms. The generalisability of the findings is limited by weak methodology and small sample size. Conclusions: Game-based interventions can improve cognition, coordination and behavioural and psychological symptoms for people with dementia. Future research should include methodological improvement and practice guideline development.