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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Price Subsidies, Diagnostic Tests, And Targeting Of Malaria Treatment: Evidence From A Randomized Controlled Trial, Jessica Cohen, Pascaline Dupas, Simone Schaner Feb 2015

Price Subsidies, Diagnostic Tests, And Targeting Of Malaria Treatment: Evidence From A Randomized Controlled Trial, Jessica Cohen, Pascaline Dupas, Simone Schaner

Open Dartmouth: Faculty Open Access Scholarship

Both under- and over-treatment of communicable diseases are public bads. But efforts to decrease one run the risk of increasing the other. Using rich experimental data on household treatment- seeking behavior in Kenya, we study the implications of this trade-off for subsidizing life-saving antimalarials sold over-the-counter at retail drug outlets. We show that a very high subsidy (such as the one under consideration by the international community) dramatically increases access, but nearly one-half of subsidized pills go to patients without malaria. We study two ways to better target subsidized drugs: reducing the subsidy level, and introducing rapid malaria tests over-the-counter ...


Technology Growth And Expenditure Growth In Health Care, Amitabh Chandra, Jonathan Skinner Sep 2012

Technology Growth And Expenditure Growth In Health Care, Amitabh Chandra, Jonathan Skinner

Open Dartmouth: Faculty Open Access Scholarship

In the United States, health care technology has contributed to rising survival rates, yet health care spending relative to GDP has also grown more rapidly than in any other country. We develop a model of patient demand and supplier behavior to explain these parallel trends in technology growth and cost growth. We show that health care productivity depends on the heterogeneity of treatment effects across patients, the shape of the health production function, and the cost structure of procedures such as MRIs with high fixed costs and low marginal costs. The model implies a typology of medical technology productivity: (I ...


The Pragmatist’S Guide To Comparative Effectiveness Research, Amitabh Chandra, Anupam B. Jena, Jonathan Skinner Apr 2011

The Pragmatist’S Guide To Comparative Effectiveness Research, Amitabh Chandra, Anupam B. Jena, Jonathan Skinner

Open Dartmouth: Faculty Open Access Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Being Surveyed Can Change Later Behavior And Related Parameter Estimates, Alix Peterson Zwane, Jonathan Zinman, Eric Van Dusen, William Pariente Feb 2011

Being Surveyed Can Change Later Behavior And Related Parameter Estimates, Alix Peterson Zwane, Jonathan Zinman, Eric Van Dusen, William Pariente

Open Dartmouth: Faculty Open Access Scholarship

Does completing a household survey change the later behavior of those surveyed? In three field studies of health and two of microlending, we randomly assigned subjects to be surveyed about health and/or household finances and then measured subsequent use of a related product with data that does not rely on subjects' self-reports. In the three health experiments, we find that being surveyed increases use of water treatment products and take-up of medical insurance. Frequent surveys on reported diarrhea also led to biased estimates of the impact of improved source water quality. In two microlending studies, we do not find ...


Put Your Money Where Your Butt Is: A Commitment Contract For Smoking Cessation, Xavier Giné, Dean Karlan, Jonathan Zinman Oct 2010

Put Your Money Where Your Butt Is: A Commitment Contract For Smoking Cessation, Xavier Giné, Dean Karlan, Jonathan Zinman

Open Dartmouth: Faculty Open Access Scholarship

We designed and tested a voluntary commitment product to help smokers quit smoking. The product (CARES) offered smokers a savings account in which they deposit funds for six months, after which they take a urine test for nicotine and cotinine. If they pass, their money is returned; otherwise, their money is forfeited to charity. Of smokers offered CARES, 11 percent took up, and smokers randomly offered CARES were 3 percentage points more likely to pass the 6-month test than the control group. More importantly, this effect persisted in surprise tests at 12 months, indicating that CARES produced lasting smoking cessation ...


Is American Health Care Uniquely Inefficient?, Alan M. Garber, Jonathan Skinner Sep 2008

Is American Health Care Uniquely Inefficient?, Alan M. Garber, Jonathan Skinner

Open Dartmouth: Faculty Open Access Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Preference Heterogeneity And Insurance Markets: Explaining A Puzzle Of Insurance, David M. Cutler, Amy Finkelstein, Kathleen Mcgarry May 2008

Preference Heterogeneity And Insurance Markets: Explaining A Puzzle Of Insurance, David M. Cutler, Amy Finkelstein, Kathleen Mcgarry

Open Dartmouth: Faculty Open Access Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Productivity Spillovers In Healthcare: Evidence From The Treatment Of Heart Attacks, Amitabh Chandra, Douglas O. Staiger Apr 2008

Productivity Spillovers In Healthcare: Evidence From The Treatment Of Heart Attacks, Amitabh Chandra, Douglas O. Staiger

Open Dartmouth: Faculty Open Access Scholarship

A large literature in medicine documents variation across areas in the use of surgical treatments that is unrelated to outcomes. Observers of this phenomena have invoked “flat of the curve medicine” to explain these facts, and have advocated for reductions in spending in high-use areas. In contrast, we develop a simple Roy model of patient treatment choice with productivity spillovers that can generate the empirical facts. Our model predicts that high-use areas will have higher returns to surgery, better outcomes among patients most appropriate for surgery, and worse outcomes among patients least appropriate for surgery, while displaying no relationship between ...


Could Distance Be A Proxy For Severity-Of-Illness? A Comparison Of Hospital Costs In Distant And Local Patients., H G. Welch, E B. Larson, W P. Welch Oct 1993

Could Distance Be A Proxy For Severity-Of-Illness? A Comparison Of Hospital Costs In Distant And Local Patients., H G. Welch, E B. Larson, W P. Welch

Open Dartmouth: Faculty Open Access Scholarship

We test the hypothesis that hospital costs, after adjusting for DRG mix, are higher in distant patients than in local patients. Data were obtained from the Washington State Commission Hospital Abstract Reporting System (CHARS) and included all patients discharged from 15 metropolitan hospitals in the state of Washington during fiscal year 1987 (N = 181,072).