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Mesosphere

Series

Oceanography and Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology

2013

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Physics

Temperatures In The Mid-Latitude Mesosphere During Sudden Stratospheric Warmings As Determined From Rayleigh Lidar Data, Leda Sox, Vincent B. Wickwar, Chad Fish, Joshua P. Herron Dec 2013

Temperatures In The Mid-Latitude Mesosphere During Sudden Stratospheric Warmings As Determined From Rayleigh Lidar Data, Leda Sox, Vincent B. Wickwar, Chad Fish, Joshua P. Herron

Graduate Student Posters

Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSWs) are major disturbances in the polar region of the winter hemisphere that cause major changes in stratospheric temperature and circulation. SSWs are characterized by a temperature increase of tens of degrees Kelvin, averaged over 60°-90° latitude, and a weakening of the polar vortex that persists for the order of a week at the 10 hPa level (roughly 32 km) [Labitzke and Naujokat, 2000]. The polar vortices are cyclones centered on both of the Earth’s poles that are present from the mid-troposphere to the lower stratosphere. Eastward zonal winds define the strong polar vortices in ...


Ground-Based Observations With A Rayleigh-Mie-Raman Lidar From 15-120 Km, Leda Sox, Vincent B. Wickwar, Joshua P. Herron, David L. Barton, Matthew T. Emerick Oct 2013

Ground-Based Observations With A Rayleigh-Mie-Raman Lidar From 15-120 Km, Leda Sox, Vincent B. Wickwar, Joshua P. Herron, David L. Barton, Matthew T. Emerick

Graduate Student Posters

Rayleigh lidar systems have historically made ground-based observations of the upper atmosphere (stratosphere and mesosphere) from 35-90 km. This technology has helped fill the data collection gap between the troposphere and space. Recently our Rayleigh lidar group at the Atmospheric Lidar Observatory on the campus of Utah State University (42° N, 112° W) upgraded the original lidar system in order to extend the measurement range for neutral densities and temperatures to higher altitudes and has increased the upper limit, so far, from 90 to 110 km. Next, we will extend the lower altitude limit downward to 15 km. This will ...


Midlatitude, Rayleigh-Mie-Raman Lidar For Observations From 15 To 120 Km, Vincent B. Wickwar, Leda Sox, Joshua P. Herron, Matthew T. Emerick Aug 2013

Midlatitude, Rayleigh-Mie-Raman Lidar For Observations From 15 To 120 Km, Vincent B. Wickwar, Leda Sox, Joshua P. Herron, Matthew T. Emerick

Presentations

No abstract provided.