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2014

Biology Faculty Publications

Axolotl

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Probability Of Regenerating A Normal Limb After Bite Injury In The Mexican Axolotl (Ambystoma Mexicanum), Sierra Thompson, Laura Muzinic, Christopher Muzinic, Matthew L. Niemiller, S. Randal Voss Jun 2014

Probability Of Regenerating A Normal Limb After Bite Injury In The Mexican Axolotl (Ambystoma Mexicanum), Sierra Thompson, Laura Muzinic, Christopher Muzinic, Matthew L. Niemiller, S. Randal Voss

Biology Faculty Publications

Multiple factors are thought to cause limb abnormalities in amphibian populations by altering processes of limb development and regeneration. We examined adult and juvenile axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum) in the Ambystoma Genetic Stock Center (AGSC) for limb and digit abnormalities to investigate the probability of normal regeneration after bite injury. We observed that 80% of larval salamanders show evidence of bite injury at the time of transition from group housing to solitary housing. Among 717 adult axolotls that were surveyed, which included solitary-housed males and group-housed females, approximately half presented abnormalities, including examples of extra or missing digits and limbs, fused ...


Characterization Of In Vitro Transcriptional Responses Of Dorsal Root Ganglia Cultured In The Presence And Absence Of Blastema Cells From Regenerating Salamander Limbs, Antony Athippozhy, Jeffrey Lehrberg, James R. Monaghan, David M. Gardiner, S. Randal Voss Apr 2014

Characterization Of In Vitro Transcriptional Responses Of Dorsal Root Ganglia Cultured In The Presence And Absence Of Blastema Cells From Regenerating Salamander Limbs, Antony Athippozhy, Jeffrey Lehrberg, James R. Monaghan, David M. Gardiner, S. Randal Voss

Biology Faculty Publications

During salamander limb regeneration, nerves provide signals that induce the formation of a mass of proliferative cells called the blastema. To better understand these signals, we developed a blastema-dorsal root ganglia (DRG) co-culture model system to test the hypothesis that nerves differentially express genes in response to cues provided by the blastema. DRG with proximal and distal nerve trunks were isolated from axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum), cultured for five days, and subjected to microarray analysis. Relative to freshly isolated DRG, 1,541 Affymetrix probe sets were identified as differentially expressed and many of the predicted genes are known to function in ...