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Retirement Security Law Commons

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Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Retirement Security Law

Public Pensions And Fiduciary Law: A View From Equity, T. Leigh Anenson Sep 2016

Public Pensions And Fiduciary Law: A View From Equity, T. Leigh Anenson

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Controversies involving fund management may be the next frontier of public pension litigation. Recent scandals involving fraud, bribery, and corruption of public pension officials and other third parties have drawn the public eye toward the management of retirement assets. Individual and entity custodians, including pension boards of trustees, are charged with making investment and other decisions relating to pension funds. Unlike private pensions, there is no federal oversight of asset managers or others in control of retirement funds. Yet these funds hold more than three trillion dollars in assets. Until now, the guardians of these monies have operated almost invisibly ...


One Fund Solution And The Pension Crisis, Gordon Butler Jun 2016

One Fund Solution And The Pension Crisis, Gordon Butler

Cleveland State Law Review

The next forty years of economic life will be dominated by one underlying theme: dealing with the retirement income security of a growing, aging and longer-lived global population. This is a "can’t run, can’t hide" problem that will affect the lives of almost every human being on the planet . . . Whether you are light in your pension account, whether you have more money than Croesus, whether you live in the well-funded Netherlands, or whether you are a put-upon unambitious young male in Japan who sees no future for himself, you cannot escape this problem.

Before you read very far ...


Trusts No More: Rethinking The Regulation Of Retirement Savings In The United States, Natalya Shnitser Mar 2016

Trusts No More: Rethinking The Regulation Of Retirement Savings In The United States, Natalya Shnitser

BYU Law Review

The regulation of private and public pension plans in the United States begins with the premise that employer-sponsored plans resemble traditional donative, or gift, trusts. Accordingly, the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) famously “imports” major principles of donative trust law for the regulation of private employer-sponsored pension plans. Statutes regulating state and local government pension plans likewise routinely invoke the structure and standards applicable to donative trusts. Judges, in turn, adjudicate by analogy to the common law trust.

This Article identifies the flaws in the analogy and analyzes the shortcomings of a regulatory framework that, despite dramatic ...