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Full-Text Articles in Legal Profession

Persuasion, Joseph William Singer Aug 1989

Persuasion, Joseph William Singer

Michigan Law Review

Lawyers spend a lot of time attempting to persuade other people. They persuade judges to promulgate rules of law that favor their clients. They persuade their law partners to adopt their interpretation of existing law or to adopt their strategy for litigation. They persuade clients to accept the dictates of the law. They persuade adversaries in settlement negotiations and their clients' business associates in contract negotiations. They persuade legislatures to fund legal services for the poor, to adopt or to reject law reforms.

Law professors spend most of their time teaching - or at least practicing - the art of persuasion. We ...


Class Of 1989 Five Year Report Dean's Letter, Jeffrey S. Lehman Jan 1989

Class Of 1989 Five Year Report Dean's Letter, Jeffrey S. Lehman

UMLS Alumni Survey Class Reports

This letter was sent to alumni with the report.


The University And The Aims Of Professional Education, Terrance Sandalow Jan 1989

The University And The Aims Of Professional Education, Terrance Sandalow

Book Chapters

The graduate schools of elite American universities, Daniel Bell wrote not many years ago (though before "elite" had become a term of opprobrium), stand at the center of their parent institutions, a position from which they dominate not only American higher education but, increasingly, the intellectual life of the nation. Michigan was, of course, high on Bell's list of elite universities, and it is, therefore, fitting that we mark the fiftieth anniversary of the establishment of its graduate school as an occasion worthy of celebration.


Class Of 1989 Five Year Report, University Of Michigan Law School Jan 1989

Class Of 1989 Five Year Report, University Of Michigan Law School

UMLS Alumni Survey Class Reports

This report summarizes the findings of a questionnaire sent to University of Michigan Law School alumni five years after graduation.


Class Of 1989 Five Year Report Alumni Comments, University Of Michigan Law School Jan 1989

Class Of 1989 Five Year Report Alumni Comments, University Of Michigan Law School

UMLS Alumni Survey Class Reports

This addendum is a compilation of alumni responses to the open-ended comments sections.


Finding Yourself In Law School, Joel Jay Finer Jan 1989

Finding Yourself In Law School, Joel Jay Finer

Cleveland State Law Review

Congratulations on your acceptance and your decision to enter law school. Some might say after reading this commentary that it was more appropriate for a commencement address. But stop to think. Commencement means beginning. This is your commencement, the beginning of your legal career. And if the values to which I refer are not somewhere in your thoughts during your law school education, when you can begin to see how your technical skills can be put to use in service of whatever justice goals you personally find most meaningful, it may be more difficult to make the connections later on ...


Accommodation And Satisfaction: Women And Men Lawyers And The Balance Of Work And Family, David L. Chambers Jan 1989

Accommodation And Satisfaction: Women And Men Lawyers And The Balance Of Work And Family, David L. Chambers

Articles

This study of graduates of the University of Michigan Law School from the late 1970s reports on the differing ways that women and men have responded to the conflicting claims of work and family. It finds that women with children who have entered the profession have indeed continued to bear the principalr esponsibilitiesf or the care of children, but it alsof inds that these women, with all their burdens, are more satisfied with their careers and with the balance of their family and professional lives than other women and than men.


Educational Debts And The Worsening Position Of Small-Firm, Government, And Legal-Services Lawyers, David L. Chambers Jan 1989

Educational Debts And The Worsening Position Of Small-Firm, Government, And Legal-Services Lawyers, David L. Chambers

Articles

Law school operating costs are up. Tuitions are up. The debts of law students are up. What is happening to the students who have borrowed large sums? Are their debts affecting their decisions about the jobs to seek? Once in practice, are they significantly affecting the standard of living they can afford to maintain? What, in particular, is the effect of debts on those who enter-or contemplate entering-small firms, government, legal services, and "public interest" work where salaries are lower than in most other settings in which lawyers work? In the preceding essay, Jack Kramer has performed another extremely valuable ...