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Full-Text Articles in Legal Profession

The Unconstitutionality Of Mandatory Detention During Competency Restoration, Marisol Orihuela Jan 2017

The Unconstitutionality Of Mandatory Detention During Competency Restoration, Marisol Orihuela

Berkeley Journal of Criminal Law

Defense attorneys have long struggled with the ethical obligation to raise competency concerns about a client to the court when doing so would prolong the client’s time in detention. This dilemma, well-documented in legal ethics scholarship, relies on an assumption that detention is a necessary component of competency restoration. As this Article shows, that assumption is wrong.

This Article uncovers how the practice of mandatory detention for competency restoration was left undisturbed for decades, even as policymakers and courts increasingly recognized the constitutional concerns with automatic detention of individuals with severe mental illness in other arenas. After exposing the ...


Lawyers Serving As Judges, Prosecutors, And Defense Lawyers At The Same Time: Legal Ethics And Municipal Courts, Peter A. Joy Jan 2016

Lawyers Serving As Judges, Prosecutors, And Defense Lawyers At The Same Time: Legal Ethics And Municipal Courts, Peter A. Joy

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

This Article analyzes the intersection between judges, prosecutors, and defense attorneys in St. Louis County and the State of Missouri. Joy explores ethical issues that arise when attorneys practice concurrently in these areas and outlines potential solutions for violations. Joy argues that municipal judges should be prohibited from serving as prosecutors and defense attorneys and for restrictions preventing lawyers from serving as both a prosecutor and defense attorney in the same county.


The Perilous Psychology Of Public Defending, Scott Howe Dec 2014

The Perilous Psychology Of Public Defending, Scott Howe

Scott W. Howe

This article examining the ethical challenges confronting most public defender attorneys is framed as a fictional talk presented by P.D. Atty, a former public defender attorney, at a small conference of new public defender attorneys. The presentation asserts that public defenders typically face psychological obstacles to providing zealous advocacy for all of their clients and that an essential aspect of the remedy starts with recognition of these psychological barriers. The author contends that these challenges relate to a typically unacknowledged aversion to representing certain kinds of criminal defendants. Contrary to common supposition, the strongest aversion is not to representation ...


Should Bush Administration Lawyers Be Prosecuted For Authorizing Torture?, Claire Oakes Finkelstein, Michael Lewis Jan 2010

Should Bush Administration Lawyers Be Prosecuted For Authorizing Torture?, Claire Oakes Finkelstein, Michael Lewis

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Lawyers And Fundamental Moral Responsibility, R. Michael Cassidy, Daniel Coquillette, Judith Mcmorrow Dec 2009

Lawyers And Fundamental Moral Responsibility, R. Michael Cassidy, Daniel Coquillette, Judith Mcmorrow

R. Michael Cassidy

The materials in this book are organized around specific problems designed to encourage and focus class discussion. There are two other inherent organizing principles of the materials in this book. First, the philosophical materials are in the rough order in which the ideas themselves evolved in the history of philosophy. The materials have been revised since the book first was published in 1995 to address some of the burning ethical problems of our day, including terrorism, national security, and abuse of government power. The Second Edition also is reorganized to assist students to better appreciate philosophical theories underpinning discourse about ...


Prosecutorial Ethics, R. Michael Cassidy Dec 2004

Prosecutorial Ethics, R. Michael Cassidy

R. Michael Cassidy

This casebook explores the ethical responsibilities of a prosecutor at each stage of the criminal justice process. Focusing on ethical and constitutional constraints on prosecutorial discretion, the texts covers both Supreme Court decisions interpreting Fifth and Sixth Amendment guarantees and state rules of attorney conduct. Topics discussed include a prosecutor’s conduct during criminal investigations, charging decisions, grand jury practice, interviewing and contacting witnesses, plea bargaining, jury selection, trial conduct, and publicity. Each chapter is followed by real-world hypotheticals designed to introduce students to the ethical dilemmas typically encountered by government lawyers in criminal practice. This book is suitable for ...


'Soft Words Of Hope:' Giglio, Accomplice Witnesses, And The Problem Of Implied Inducements, R. Michael Cassidy Dec 2003

'Soft Words Of Hope:' Giglio, Accomplice Witnesses, And The Problem Of Implied Inducements, R. Michael Cassidy

R. Michael Cassidy

Many scholars have criticized the government's practice of rewarding accomplices with leniency in exchange for their cooperation in criminal cases, because such practice provides the accomplice with a tremendous inducement to fabricate in order to curry favor with the government. To date, however, no commentators have approached the complex problem of accomplice fabrication from the perspective of criminal discovery. In the enclosed article, the author takes a fresh look at the subject of accomplice testimony, and argues that what are needed are not further restrictions on the circumstances in which an accomplice may testify, but rather a more vigorous ...