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Articles 1 - 21 of 21

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Law Library Blog (November 2017): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law Nov 2017

Law Library Blog (November 2017): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Law Library Newsletters/Blog

No abstract provided.


Barnett Vs. Corson. Libel—Truth Of Statement As A Defence—Malice—Act Of Apr. 11, 1901, Construed Oct 2017

Barnett Vs. Corson. Libel—Truth Of Statement As A Defence—Malice—Act Of Apr. 11, 1901, Construed

Dickinson Law Review

No abstract provided.


Introduction To Section Iv: Reflections About Legal Education, Laurel Terry Oct 2017

Introduction To Section Iv: Reflections About Legal Education, Laurel Terry

Dickinson Law Review

No abstract provided.


“The Lost Lawyer” Regained: The Abiding Values Of The Legal Profession, Robert Maccrate Oct 2017

“The Lost Lawyer” Regained: The Abiding Values Of The Legal Profession, Robert Maccrate

Dickinson Law Review

No abstract provided.


Changing The Modal Law School: Rethinking U.S. Legal Education In (Most) Schools, Nancy B. Rapoport Oct 2017

Changing The Modal Law School: Rethinking U.S. Legal Education In (Most) Schools, Nancy B. Rapoport

Dickinson Law Review

This essay argues that discussions of educational reform in U.S. law schools have suffered from a fundamental misconception: that the education provided in all of the American Bar Association-accredited schools is roughly the same. A better description of the educational opportunities provided by ABA-accredited law schools would group the schools into three rough clusters: the “elite” law schools, the modal (most frequently occurring) law schools, and the precarious law schools. Because the elite law schools do not need much “reforming,” the better focus of reform would concentrate on the modal and precarious schools; however, both elite and modal law ...


Introduction To Section V: Facilitating Dialogue With And About The Profession, Maureen Weidman Oct 2017

Introduction To Section V: Facilitating Dialogue With And About The Profession, Maureen Weidman

Dickinson Law Review

No abstract provided.


Law Firm Economics And Professionalism, Ward Bower Oct 2017

Law Firm Economics And Professionalism, Ward Bower

Dickinson Law Review

Both Dean Kronman in The Lost Lawyer and Professor Glendon in A Nation Under Lawyers attribute some of the problems and challenges facing lawyers today to economic pressures and to a preoccupation with profits and fees. For Kronman, this economic focus interferes with the “moral detachment” necessary for achievement of the “lawyer-statesman” ideal. For Glendon, professional dilemmas caused by the deterioration of the legal economy, competition in the marketplace, lawyer-shopping by clients, early specialization, lack of mentoring and emphasis on the billable hour have created an unhappy generation of ethically challenged practitioners.

Both authors accurately assess the state of the ...


Lawyers In The Mist: The Golden Age Of Legal Nostalgia, Marc Galanter Oct 2017

Lawyers In The Mist: The Golden Age Of Legal Nostalgia, Marc Galanter

Dickinson Law Review

No one watching the contemporary furor over the litigation explosion and lawsuits devouring America can fail to be impressed by the power of folklore to overwhelm workaday organized social knowledge. Time and again, the protestations of bean-counters and skeptics are vanquished by stories about perverse institutions peopled by malingering plaintiffs, greedy lawyers, capricious jurors, and arrogant judges, proving yet again that it is not what is so that matters, but what people—at least for the moment—think is so. Tenacious belief may not make it so, but can have powerful effects.

In this essay I address another cluster of ...


Introduction To Section Vi: Understanding And Improving Our Judicial System, Hanna Borsilli Oct 2017

Introduction To Section Vi: Understanding And Improving Our Judicial System, Hanna Borsilli

Dickinson Law Review

No abstract provided.


Bringing Compassion Into The Province Of Judging: Justice Blackmun And The Outsiders, Pamela S. Karlan Oct 2017

Bringing Compassion Into The Province Of Judging: Justice Blackmun And The Outsiders, Pamela S. Karlan

Dickinson Law Review

No abstract provided.


Justice Blackmun And Preclusion In The State-Federal Context, Karen Nelson Moore Oct 2017

Justice Blackmun And Preclusion In The State-Federal Context, Karen Nelson Moore

Dickinson Law Review

No abstract provided.


Our Courts, Ourselves: How The Alternative Dispute Resolution Movement Is Re-Shaping Our Legal System, Deborah R. Hensler Oct 2017

Our Courts, Ourselves: How The Alternative Dispute Resolution Movement Is Re-Shaping Our Legal System, Deborah R. Hensler

Dickinson Law Review

Twenty-seven years ago, Professor Frank Sander urged American lawyers and judges to re-imagine the civil courts as a collection of dispute resolution procedures tailored to fit the variety of disputes that parties bring to the justice system. Professor Sander’s vision of the justice system encompassed traditional litigation leading to trial, but his speech at the 1976 Roscoe Pound Conference drew attention to alternatives to traditional dispute resolution that he argued would better serve disputants and society than traditional adversarial processes.

Today, interest in dispute resolution is high. This interest cuts across many domains, ranging from the family, to the ...


Pleading, For The Future: Conversations After Iqbal, Lee H. Rosenthal Oct 2017

Pleading, For The Future: Conversations After Iqbal, Lee H. Rosenthal

Dickinson Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Uniform Commercial Acts, J.P. Mckeehan Oct 2017

The Uniform Commercial Acts, J.P. Mckeehan

Dickinson Law Review

The Commissioners on Uniform State Laws have had twenty- five annual conferences. The principal fruit of their labors is represented by the Negotiable Instruments Act, enacted in forty-seven jurisdictions; the Warehouse Receipts Act, enacted in thirty-one jurisdictions; the Sales Act, enacted in fourteen jurisdictions, the Bills of Lading Act enacted in thirteen jurisdictions, and the Stock Transfer Act, enacted in nine jurisdictions. They have also drafted acts relating to divorce, family desertion, probate of wills, marriage evasion, workmen’s compensation and partnership but these have not yet been enacted in more than a few states. All of the commercial acts ...


Uniform Commercial Acts, Samuel Williston Oct 2017

Uniform Commercial Acts, Samuel Williston

Dickinson Law Review

No abstract provided.


Beyond Stamp Collecting: Ronald Coase And “Scientific” Legal Scholarship, John N. Drobak Jan 2017

Beyond Stamp Collecting: Ronald Coase And “Scientific” Legal Scholarship, John N. Drobak

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

This Essay argues that legal scholarship is properly considered a highly technical field of study rather than a system based on classifications. Drobak concedes that excellent legal scholarship requires a complex system of classifications akin to “stamp collecting.” Drobak then makes a case for legal research as a technical science requiring an interdisciplinary approach to confront new issues and further develop current legal doctrines.


Race And Law School: The Intersection Of Obstacles For Aspiring Black Lawyers, Hope Smith Jan 2017

Race And Law School: The Intersection Of Obstacles For Aspiring Black Lawyers, Hope Smith

Summer Program for Undergraduate Research (SPUR)

Recent data of the legal profession have raised red flags about the lack of diversity in the field as compared to other career choices. Due to the fact that 4 of 5 lawyers are white, this leaves very little room for black lawyers to fill jobs in their desired positions. This paper first establishes the literary origins of the black lawyer and succinctly follows the progression made to the emergence of corporate law as an attractive legal sector for black lawyers and further analyzes the connection of the two. Using the survey data, the paper gathers and explains lived experiences ...


Administrative Dissents, Sharon B. Jacobs Jan 2017

Administrative Dissents, Sharon B. Jacobs

Articles

Commissioners, like judges, dissent. They do so at length, with vigor, and with persistence. Yet while separate judicial decisions are the subject of a rich literature, their administrative counterparts have long languished in obscurity. A closer look is warranted, however, because studying administrative dissent can enhance our understanding of internal agency operations as well as the relationships between agencies and other actors. This Article presents the results of an original review of separate statements at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission dating back four decades. It uses these findings to move beyond two common generalizations about ...


Law Library Blog (January 2017): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law Jan 2017

Law Library Blog (January 2017): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Law Library Newsletters/Blog

No abstract provided.


Embracing New (And Old) Ideas, James E. Daily Jan 2017

Embracing New (And Old) Ideas, James E. Daily

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

This Essay, by James E. Daily, lecturer at Washington University School of Law, identifies current declines in the demand for legal education and the greater job market offers a possible solution—re-introducing the LL.B degree. Daily looks at the historical increases in demand that led to the acceptance of the J.D. as the standard law degree required for practice. Daily proposes law schools should re-organize the current J.D. program to become a research or theory-focused advanced degree, and re-introduce the LL.B undergraduate LL.B degree that integrates the use and creation of new technologies in legal ...


James Dewitt Andrews: Classifying The Law In The Early Twentieth Century*, Richard A. Danner Jan 2017

James Dewitt Andrews: Classifying The Law In The Early Twentieth Century*, Richard A. Danner

Faculty Scholarship

This paper examines the efforts of New York lawyer James DeWitt Andrews and others to create a new classification system for American law in the early years of the twentieth century. Inspired by fragments left by founding father James Wilson, Andrews worked though the American Bar Association and organized independent projects to classify the law. A controversial figure, whose motives were often questioned, Andrews engaged the support and at times the antagonism of prominent legal figures such as John H. Wigmore, Roscoe Pound, and William Howard Taft before his plans ended with the founding of the American Law Institute in ...