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Articles 1 - 26 of 26

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Appeal To Heaven: On The Religious Origins Of The Constitutional Right Of Revolution, John M. Kang Dec 2009

Appeal To Heaven: On The Religious Origins Of The Constitutional Right Of Revolution, John M. Kang

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

No abstract provided.


Langdell And The Invention Of Legal Doctrine, Catharine Wells Nov 2009

Langdell And The Invention Of Legal Doctrine, Catharine Wells

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

This paper addresses two related questions.

The first relates to Langdell and his development of a doctrinal theory of contract law. The substance and method of Langdell’s work has not been well understood and this paper uses a variety of historical materials to remedy this problem. It begins with a review of contract law prior to Langdell. Contract law at this time was in a very primitive state. The available treatises were confusing and the cases themselves offered little guidance for predicting future case outcomes. The paper then proceeds to examine Langdell’s method by describing certain logic texts ...


The Constitutional Canon As Argumentative Metonymy, Ian C. Bartrum May 2009

The Constitutional Canon As Argumentative Metonymy, Ian C. Bartrum

Faculty Scholarship Series

This article builds on Philip Bobbitt's Wittgensteinian insights into constitutional argument and law. I examine the way that we interact with canonical texts as we construct arguments in the forms that Bobbitt has described. I contend that these texts serve as metonyms for larger sets of associated principles and values, and that their invocation usually is not meant to point to the literal meaning of the text itself. This conception helps explain how a canonical text's meaning in constitutional argument can evolve over time, and hopefully offers the creative practitioner some insight into the kinds of arguments that ...


Arsenic And Old Chemistry: Images Of Mad Alchemists, Experts Attacking Experts, And The Crisis In Forensic Science, David S. Caudill May 2009

Arsenic And Old Chemistry: Images Of Mad Alchemists, Experts Attacking Experts, And The Crisis In Forensic Science, David S. Caudill

Working Paper Series

Drawing on research into the use of experts in early 19th-century criminal trials, the image of mad alchemists in popular culture representations of science, and the distinction between empirical and contingent “interpretive repertoires” in the discourse of scientific controversies, this article explores the controversy over arsenic-detection technologies prior to the Marsh test. In addition to noting the predictable criticism of incompetent expertise in the service of law, this article highlights implied accusations of hubris and amorality on the part of over-confident experts, both in the early 19th-century and in today's crisis of forensic science.


Abortion Across State Lines, Joseph W. Dellapenna May 2009

Abortion Across State Lines, Joseph W. Dellapenna

Working Paper Series

In this Article, I propose to analyze conflicts of law precedents and theory to explore the extent to which a state can apply its law on abortion to abortions performed outside the state but bearing a significant connection to the state. In attempting to resolve such questions, we enter into the domain of choice of law, part of the field of conflicts of law. This domain is notoriously unstable and contested. This instability allows legal commentators to project their attitudes towards abortion (and many other matters) in analyzing and construing the relevant authorities to resolve choice of law issues. I ...


Legal Transplants: Slavery And The Civil Law In Louisiana, Ariela J. Gross May 2009

Legal Transplants: Slavery And The Civil Law In Louisiana, Ariela J. Gross

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

Can Louisiana tell us something about civil law vs. common law regimes of slavery? What can the Louisiana experience tell us about a civil law jurisdiction “transplanted” in a common-law country? Louisiana is unique among American states in having been governed first by France, then by Spain, before becoming a U.S. territory and state in the nineteenth century. Unlike other slave states, it operated under a civil code, first the Digest of 1808, and then the Code of 1825. With regard to the regulation of slaves, these codes also incorporated a “Black Code,” first adopted in 1806, which owed ...


The Constitution Of History And Memory, Ariela J. Gross May 2009

The Constitution Of History And Memory, Ariela J. Gross

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

Almost twenty years ago, the historian Pierre Nora wrote about the growing number of “lieux de mémoire” – museums, monuments, and memorials – where post-modern society situates public memory of traumatic or triumphant events. Yet he devoted little sustained attention to what may be the quintessential “lieu de mémoire” today, the courtroom or truth commission hearing room. Traces of our contemporary obsession with the encounter among law, history and memory are everywhere. And so are lawyers: writing new constitutions for new republics, staffing international tribunals for war criminals, taking testimonies for truth commissions. Yet much of the enthusiasm for legal strategies to ...


Resolving Political Questions Into Judicial Questions: Tocqueville's Thesis Revisited, Mark Graber Apr 2009

Resolving Political Questions Into Judicial Questions: Tocqueville's Thesis Revisited, Mark Graber

Mark Graber

This paper explores whether national political questions during the second party system were resolved into questions adjudicated by the Supreme Court of the United States. The essay details an appropriate test for Tocqueville’s thesis, demonstrates that most national political questions that excited Jacksonians were not resolved into judicial questions, and explains why Tocqueville’s thesis does not accurately describe national constitutional politics during the three decades before the Civil War. That most political questions were not resolved into judicial questions during the three decades before the Civil War given common political science claim that “(v)irtually any issue the ...


Law, War, And The History Of Time, Mary L. Dudziak Apr 2009

Law, War, And The History Of Time, Mary L. Dudziak

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

This paper examines wartime as a form of time, arguing that assumptions about the temporality of war are a feature of American legal thought. Time is thought to be linear and episodic, moving from one kind of time (peacetime) to another kind of time (wartime) in sequence. In this way of thinking, war is by definition temporary, so that war’s impact on law is limited in time. This understanding of war and time, however, is in tension with the practice of war in 20th century U.S. history, for American involvement in overseas military action has been continuous.

Drawing ...


James Buchanan As Savior? Judicial Power, Political Fragmentation, And The Failed 1831 Repeal Of Section 25, Mark Graber Mar 2009

James Buchanan As Savior? Judicial Power, Political Fragmentation, And The Failed 1831 Repeal Of Section 25, Mark Graber

Mark Graber

James Buchanan is often credited with being the unlikely savior of judicial review in early Jacksonian America. In 1831, Buchanan, then a representative from Pennsylvania, issued a minority report criticizing the proposed repeal of Section 25 of the Judiciary Act of 1789 that is generally credited with convincing a skeptical Congress that fundamental constitutional norms required federal judicial oversight of state courts and state legislatures. This paper claims that federalism and political fragmentation were more responsible than James Buchanan for the failed repeal of Section 25, for the maintenance of judicial power in the United States during the transition from ...


The Neal Report And The Crisis In Antitrust, Herbert J. Hovenkamp Mar 2009

The Neal Report And The Crisis In Antitrust, Herbert J. Hovenkamp

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

The Neal Report, which was commissioned by Lyndon Johnson and published in 1967, is rightfully criticized for representing the past rather than the future of antitrust. Its authors completely embraced a theory of competition and industrial organization that had dominated American economic thinking for forty years, but was just in the process of coming to an end. The structure-conduct-performance (S-C-P) paradigm that the Neal Report embodied had in fact been one of the most elegant and most tested theories of industrial organization. The theory represented the high point of structuralism in industrial organization economics, resting on the proposition that certain ...


The Innkeeper's Tale: The Legal Development Of A Public Calling, David S. Bogen Feb 2009

The Innkeeper's Tale: The Legal Development Of A Public Calling, David S. Bogen

David S. Bogen

No abstract provided.


Tre Giuristi Perugini Cinquecenteschi: Giovan Paolo Lancellotti, Paolo Comitoli, Benincasio Benincasa, Adolfo Giuliani Jan 2009

Tre Giuristi Perugini Cinquecenteschi: Giovan Paolo Lancellotti, Paolo Comitoli, Benincasio Benincasa, Adolfo Giuliani

Adolfo Giuliani

Why did moral theology become such an important source of legal principles in the late 16th century? This paper argues that to begin to understand the pervasive moral transformation of those decades we need first to consider the ways by which those jurists confidently rewrote the boundaries between canon law, civil law and moral theology.
This paper is focused on the three jurists — a civilian, a canonist and a theologian — who shared the intellectual atmosphere of the university of Perugia between 16th and 17th century: Giovan Paolo Lancellotti, Paolo Comitoli and Benincasio Benincasa.
The full-text is available from my SSRN ...


Argonauts Of The Eastern Mediterranean: Legal Transplants And Signaling, Assaf Likhovski Jan 2009

Argonauts Of The Eastern Mediterranean: Legal Transplants And Signaling, Assaf Likhovski

Assaf Likhovski

This Article tells the story of two legal cooperation projects established by the Israeli Ministry of Justice in the 1950s and 1960s. The Article argues that the history of these projects can suggest a new way of understanding the process of legal transplantation. Much of the literature on legal transplants focuses on the legal norms transplanted.

This Article seeks to shift the focus of the debate from a discussion of the legal norms transplanted to a discussion of the social acts involved in the process of transplantation. The Article argues that while transplantation may be motivated by practical considerations,such ...


Правовая Политика Советского Государства В Сфере Регулирования Научной Деятельности (1917-Конец 20-Х Годов), Leonid G. Berlyavskiy Jan 2009

Правовая Политика Советского Государства В Сфере Регулирования Научной Деятельности (1917-Конец 20-Х Годов), Leonid G. Berlyavskiy

Leonid G. Berlyavskiy

The Soviet state legal policy bases in the sphere of the scientific activities regulation have been founded in 1917-1929. In statutory acts the subjects circle of the management boards in research activities has been defined. The legal policy was carried out by attraction of the scientific institutes, separate scientists to performance researches for the purpose of the substantiation, creation and strengthening the State-legal system. It was provided by means of legislative regulating the creation order of the state research institutes and high schools, processes of their interaction and regulation of the scientific activity itself, scientific researches financing out from the ...


The Original Meaning Of The Constitution's “Executive Vesting Clause”—Evidence From Eighteenth Century Drafting Practice, Robert G. Natelson Jan 2009

The Original Meaning Of The Constitution's “Executive Vesting Clause”—Evidence From Eighteenth Century Drafting Practice, Robert G. Natelson

Robert G. Natelson

Advocates of presidential power from the days of George Washington at least to the time of George W. Bush have claimed that the Constitution’s so-called “Executive Vesting Clause,” the first sentence of Article II, not only designates the President as chief executive, but also confers broad authority. Some commentators support that view, while others maintain that the President’s powers are limited to those enumerated elsewhere in the Constitution. This study addresses the previously-overlooked question of which interpretation is more consistent with contemporaneous drafting customs. It concludes that treating the “Executive Vesting Clause” as a mere designation is consistent ...


The Original Meaning Of The Privileges And Immunities Clause, Robert G. Natelson Jan 2009

The Original Meaning Of The Privileges And Immunities Clause, Robert G. Natelson

Robert G. Natelson

This article explains the meaning of the U.S. Constitution's Privileges and Immunities Clause of Article IV, as the Founders understood it. It explains that the terms "privileges" and "immunities" had well-understood content in 18th century law---as benefits created by government. The Clause protects states from discriminating against visitors as to the benefits of citizenship (such as access to the courts), but does not address "natural rights" such as freedom of speech and religion.


Full Faith And Credit In The Early Congress, Stephen E. Sachs Jan 2009

Full Faith And Credit In The Early Congress, Stephen E. Sachs

Stephen E. Sachs

After more than 200 years, the Full Faith and Credit Clause remains poorly understood. The Clause first issues a self-executing command (that "Full Faith and Credit shall be given"), and then empowers Congress to prescribe the manner of proof and the "Effect" of state records in other states. But if states must accord each other full faith and credit-and if nothing could be more than full-then what "Effect" could Congress give state records that they wouldn't have already? And conversely, how could Congress in any way reduce or alter the faith and credit that is due? This Article seeks ...


The Assault On Classical Legal Thought In Colombia (1886-1920), Jorge Gonzalez-Jacome Jan 2009

The Assault On Classical Legal Thought In Colombia (1886-1920), Jorge Gonzalez-Jacome

Jorge Gonzalez-Jacome

The topic of this paper is the tensions among classical legal thought (CLT) and other modes of legal thought in Colombia between 1886 and 1920. My main claim is that, during this period, CLT was attacked by a version of traditionalism and by a social-based legal thought. The former was evident in the constitutional discussions around the 1886 Colombian Constitution, while the latter became apparent in the interpretation of the Civil Code in areas such as property, contracts and torts. My goal is to tell a story that gives a sense of the fall of CLT as a process crossed ...


Neoclassicism And The Separation Of Ownership And Control, Herbert J. Hovenkamp Jan 2009

Neoclassicism And The Separation Of Ownership And Control, Herbert J. Hovenkamp

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

"Separation of ownership and control" is a phrase whose history will forever be associated with Adolf A. Berle and Gardiner C. Means' The Modern Corporation and Private Property (1932), as well as with Institutionalist economics, Legal Realism, and the New Deal. Within that milieu the large publicly held business corporation became identified with excessive managerial power at the expense of stockholders, social irresponsibility, and internal inefficiency. Neoclassical economists both then and ever since have generally been critical, both of the historical facts that Berle and Means purported to describe and of the conclusions that they drew. In fact, however, within ...


George W. Anderson (1861-1938), Alexis Anderson Dec 2008

George W. Anderson (1861-1938), Alexis Anderson

Alexis Anderson

This book is the first to gather in a single volume concise biographies of the most eminent men and women in the history of American law. Encompassing a wide range of individuals who have devised, replenished, expounded, and explained law, The Yale Biographical Dictionary of American Law presents succinct and lively entries devoted to more than 700 subjects selected for their significant and lasting influence on American law. Casting a wide net, editor Roger K. Newman includes individuals from around the country, from colonial times to the present, encompassing the spectrum of ideologies from left-wing to right, and including a ...


George M. Bourquin (1863-1958), Alexis Anderson Dec 2008

George M. Bourquin (1863-1958), Alexis Anderson

Alexis Anderson

This book is the first to gather in a single volume concise biographies of the most eminent men and women in the history of American law. Encompassing a wide range of individuals who have devised, replenished, expounded, and explained law, The Yale Biographical Dictionary of American Law presents succinct and lively entries devoted to more than 700 subjects selected for their significant and lasting influence on American law. Casting a wide net, editor Roger K. Newman includes individuals from around the country, from colonial times to the present, encompassing the spectrum of ideologies from left-wing to right, and including a ...


Portrait Of A Patriot: The Major Legal And Political Papers Of Josiah Quincy Junior, Volume 4, The Law Reports, Part One (1761-1765.), Daniel Coquillette, Neil Longley York Dec 2008

Portrait Of A Patriot: The Major Legal And Political Papers Of Josiah Quincy Junior, Volume 4, The Law Reports, Part One (1761-1765.), Daniel Coquillette, Neil Longley York

Daniel R. Coquillette

No abstract provided.


Portrait Of A Patriot: The Major Legal And Political Papers Of Josiah Quincy Junior, Volume 5, The Law Reports, Part Two (1765-1772.), Daniel Coquillette, Neil Longley York Dec 2008

Portrait Of A Patriot: The Major Legal And Political Papers Of Josiah Quincy Junior, Volume 5, The Law Reports, Part Two (1765-1772.), Daniel Coquillette, Neil Longley York

Daniel R. Coquillette

No abstract provided.


Select Ecclesiastical Cases From The King's Courts 1272-1307, David Millon Dec 2008

Select Ecclesiastical Cases From The King's Courts 1272-1307, David Millon

David K. Millon

No abstract provided.


The Framers’ Search Power: The Misunderstood Statutory History Of Suspicion & Probable Cause, Fabio Arcila, Jr. Dec 2008

The Framers’ Search Power: The Misunderstood Statutory History Of Suspicion & Probable Cause, Fabio Arcila, Jr.

Fabio Arcila Jr.

Originalist analyses of the Framers’ views about governmental search power have devoted insufficient attention to the civil search statutes they promulgated for regulatory purposes. What attention has been paid concludes that the Framers were divided about how accessible search remedies should be. This Article explains why this conventional account is mostly wrong and explores the lessons to be learned from the statutory choices the Framers made with regard to search and seizure law. In enacting civil search statutes, the Framers chose to depart from common law standards and instead largely followed the patterns of preceding British civil search statutes. The ...