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Legal History Commons

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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Thawing Out The Cold Record: Some Thoughts On How Videotaped Records May Affect Traditional Standards Of Deference On Direct And Collateral Review, Robert C. Owen, Melissa Mather Jul 2000

Thawing Out The Cold Record: Some Thoughts On How Videotaped Records May Affect Traditional Standards Of Deference On Direct And Collateral Review, Robert C. Owen, Melissa Mather

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

Appellate courts are unable to “smell the smoke of battle” from a trial. For this reason, a trial court’s decision is owed deference when examining an appeal. Video technology makes this reason for deference less relevant.


The 1% Solution: American Judges Must Enter The Internet Age, Henry H. Perritt, Ronald W. Staudt Jul 2000

The 1% Solution: American Judges Must Enter The Internet Age, Henry H. Perritt, Ronald W. Staudt

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

The internet has made it easier and affordable to share information than ever before. Many legal institutions have taken advantage of this innovation by using the internet to disseminate decisions and other legal texts or for rulemaking. Most legal institutions, however, only use the internet for approximately 1% of adjudication.


New Technologies And Appellate Practice, Philip A. Talmadge Jul 2000

New Technologies And Appellate Practice, Philip A. Talmadge

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

Technology can help enhance appellate practices. In particular, technology can improve appellate courts’: (1) electronic filing and argument of appellate cases; (2) digital maintenance of the record; (3) briefs; (4) dissemination of opinions; and (5) record storage.


Cd-Rom Briefs: Are We There Yet?, Marilyn Devin Jul 2000

Cd-Rom Briefs: Are We There Yet?, Marilyn Devin

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

Three years after the first CD-ROM brief was accepted, there is debate on acceptance as a regular practice. Issues include what the legal profession and the courts have done about adopting CD-ROM briefs, what obstacles are being encountered, and how those obstacles are being dealt with. Both views are examined along with the circumstances in which a CD-ROM brief is likely to be accepted favorably by a court.


Minnesota Court Of Appeals Hears Oral Argument Via Interactive Teleconferencing Technology, Edward Toussaint Jul 2000

Minnesota Court Of Appeals Hears Oral Argument Via Interactive Teleconferencing Technology, Edward Toussaint

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

In an effort to provide affordable access to the appellate process, the Minnesota Court of Appeals has adopted Interactive Video Teleconferencing. The Chief Judge of the Minnesota Court of Appeals discusses the history behind the decision, implementation, and the benefits along with the challenges of implementing Interactive Video Teleconferencing.


Collegiality And Technology, Michael R. Murphy Jul 2000

Collegiality And Technology, Michael R. Murphy

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

Collegiality is the relationship between colleagues. While technology may ease communication between colleagues, it may not increase collegiality. To technological advances that appellate courts are adapting are teleconferencing and electronic mail. This essay takes a critical look at both with regards to their effect on collegiality.


Redefining Rehearing: Previewing Appellate Decisions Online, J. Thomas Sullivan Jul 2000

Redefining Rehearing: Previewing Appellate Decisions Online, J. Thomas Sullivan

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

Issuing preliminary opinions for public comment is similar to rehearings. The difference is that parties outside of the litigation are able to add commentary. Judges would then reevaluate the preliminary opinion, consider the submitted comments, and then issue a final opinion. Online access to judicial decisions could make this practice more efficient and effective than rehearings.