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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Minimum Standard Of The Treatment Of Aliens, Edwin Borchard Jan 1940

Minimum Standard Of The Treatment Of Aliens, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

Its note of August 3, 1938, the Mexican Government, by its Minister of Foreign Affairs, contested the right of the United States to demand compensation for the agricultural lands of American citizens expropriated by Mexico since 1927. It asserted that the countries vigorously maintained “The principle of equality between nationals and foreigners, considering that the foreigner who voluntarily moves to a country... in search of a personal benefit, accepts in advance, together with the advantages which he is going to enjoy, the risks to which he may find himself exposed. It would be unjust that he should aspire to a ...


Supreme Court And Private Rights, Edwin Borchard Jan 1938

Supreme Court And Private Rights, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

Some of the social-political theories which influenced the framers of the Constitution were derived from Locke, Hume, Harrington, Coke and Blackstone. These men were less concerned with forms of government than with the relation between society as a whole and its individual members. They were sure that the individual possessed certain indefeasible, primordial rights and that government was designed to protect these rights against encroachment by the state or by classes within it. Perhaps the most important of these private rights was that of property, associated by Locke with liberty and often identified with it.' Thus, the effort of the ...


Taney's Influence On Constitutional Law, Edwin Borchard Jan 1936

Taney's Influence On Constitutional Law, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

The hundredth anniversary of the elevation of Roger Brooke Taney to the post of Chief Justice of the Supreme Court affords a fitting occasion to review the significance of his judicial services to the nation and to American constitutional law. A re-examination of his life work in the perspective of history indicates how unwise it often is to form rigid judgments on men and events in the excitement of contemporary emotion, for the harsh opinions which Taney evoked by his decisions on the slavery question have been tempered in the detached light reason. The historical cloud under which his name ...


International Law Of War Since The War, Edwin Borchard Jan 1934

International Law Of War Since The War, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

In all revolutionary periods customary law tends to suffer from emotional attack and from the popular demand for shortcuts to salvation. The function of law as a guaranty of general security, as a source of reliance for the weak, as a necessary foundation for enterprise 'and commitments, as an alternative to force, corruption, and favoritism, is forgotten in the hysterical exaltation of panaceas, punitive methods, and radical departures from tried experience. This is usually accompanied by depreciation of tradition and precedent as obstacles in the way of the new revelation.


Protection Of Citizens Abroad And Change Of Original Nationality, Edwin Borchard Jan 1934

Protection Of Citizens Abroad And Change Of Original Nationality, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

Precedent and time are the creators and preservers of customary law. So strong is the force of habit in human behavior that man in doubt or distress instinctively turns to past experience to see how his forbears dealt with similar problems. The law, which is the cement holding together the social structure, is, in its evolution as a conservative force, of necessity driven to search for precedents and to profit by them in building certainty and thereby security. Without landmarks there is no system; and for the very reason that international law is deficient in its lack of a legislature ...


Judicial Relief For Insecurity, Edwin Borchard Jan 1933

Judicial Relief For Insecurity, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

In an earlier article' an attempt was made to criticize the narrowness of view which has limited the concept of "wrongs" and "cause of action” to committed delicts, and the concept of the judicial process, to their redress. This superficial view of legal relations and of the judicial function has obscured realization of the fact that harm is done and rights are impaired or jeopardized by mere dispute or challenge before and without any physical attack. The mere existence of an instrument, the denial of a right, the assertion of an unfounded claim, the existence of conflicting claims to the ...


Judicial Relief For Peril And Insecurity, Edwin Borchard Jan 1932

Judicial Relief For Peril And Insecurity, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

In the United States, we are not accustomed to consider the theory of procedure as of profound importance. Possibly the extraordinary technicality of American procedure by reason of which substantive issues are so often relegated to practical oblivion by procedural tactics is in part responsible. At all events, the unsystematic and empirical method of embarking upon and concluding litigation seems to have developed a frame of mind somewhat indifferent to the theoretical function of the judicial process. For example, down to very recent days Justices of the United States Supreme Court gave expression to the view, now happily repudiated, that ...