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Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Supreme Court And Private Rights, Edwin Borchard Jan 1938

Supreme Court And Private Rights, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

Some of the social-political theories which influenced the framers of the Constitution were derived from Locke, Hume, Harrington, Coke and Blackstone. These men were less concerned with forms of government than with the relation between society as a whole and its individual members. They were sure that the individual possessed certain indefeasible, primordial rights and that government was designed to protect these rights against encroachment by the state or by classes within it. Perhaps the most important of these private rights was that of property, associated by Locke with liberty and often identified with it.' Thus, the effort of the ...


Neutrality, Edwin Borchard Jan 1938

Neutrality, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

Before 1914, it was hard to find much difference of opinion among American citizens about the proper policy of the United States in relation to foreign wars or even foreign affairs. That policy, with respect to Europe, was dictated by geographical factors and by a colonial and continental history that left little room for debate. Detachment from Europe's political entanglements, non-intervention in its internal affairs, and neutrality in its wars were the keynotes. After 1898 the acquisition of Asiatic possessions turned America to a Pacific orientation marked by uncertainty and the assumption of unnecessary risks. The desire to play ...


Strength And Weakness Of The New International Court, Edwin Borchard Jan 1922

Strength And Weakness Of The New International Court, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

For an adequate understanding of the origin, jurisdiction and functions of the newly established court of international justice at the Hague, it will be necessary to revert to the two Hague Conferences of 1899 and 1907 and to examine the organization of the Permanent Court of Arbitration at the Hague created and developed at: those Conferences. The characteristic feature of the Court of Arbitration as distinguished from the new Permanent Court of Justice lies in the fact that the personnel of the former consists of an eligible list or panel, of which there are now some one hundred and twenty ...


Some Lessons From The Civil Law, Edwin Borchard Jan 1916

Some Lessons From The Civil Law, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

The purpose of this brief article is not so much to set forth any specific institutions disclosed by a study of the civil law, as to point out some of those defects of our own system which are accentuated by comparison with the civil law, defects due to the methods rather than the substance of the common law. There is no desire to urge such a radical and perhaps impossible step as the substitution of civil law methods for our own; but in the consideration of plans for the improvement of our law, it may be profitable to observe that ...