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Full-Text Articles in Legal History

The Greatest Mall There Never Was: Assessing The Failed Attempt To Build The New Haven Galleria, Jeremy Kutner May 2012

The Greatest Mall There Never Was: Assessing The Failed Attempt To Build The New Haven Galleria, Jeremy Kutner

Student Legal History Papers

In late 1995, a dream that had fixated New Haven’s leadership since the 1960’s was coming to an end. Long buffeted by a population and wealth exodus to the suburbs, leaders had looked to a glittery downtown shopping mall to draw people, and their money, back to the city. Downtown was remade to accommodate retail heavy hitters: Macy’s, Malley’s, and the Chapel Square Mall. But it wasn’t working. Macy’s was gone. Chapel Square was hemorrhaging tenants. And so, after decades of public effort to make large-scale retail work downtown, the city’s mayor was ...


Financing Innovation: Infrastructure Development In New Haven, 1750-1850, Thomas P. Schmidt Dec 2010

Financing Innovation: Infrastructure Development In New Haven, 1750-1850, Thomas P. Schmidt

Student Legal History Papers

The nineteenth century was a time of astonishing change in technologies of transportation. When the Constitution was ratified, to travel from New Haven to Hartford would require an arduous and uncertain trip on a rough road that could span more than a day. At the start of the twentieth century, railroads conveyed thousands of people daily along that route in a few hours, and the first automobiles were motoring over roads. The great progress in infrastructure development radically transformed the commercial, physical, and cultural landscape of America.

This transformation required great mobilizations of capital and human labor, which, in turn ...


The Limits Of Lex Americana: The Holocaust Restitution Litigation As A Cul-De-Sac Of International Human-Rights Law, Michael Allen Sep 2009

The Limits Of Lex Americana: The Holocaust Restitution Litigation As A Cul-De-Sac Of International Human-Rights Law, Michael Allen

Student Scholarship Papers

This article addresses the Holocaust-restitution litigation of the late 1990s, which resulted in spectacular settlements totaling over $9 billion and culminated with an Executive Agreement between Germany and the United States in 2000. Prominent law scholars such as NYU Professor Burt Neuborne and Michael Bazyler, author of Holocaust Justice: The Battle for Restitution in America's Courts (2003) and Holocaust Restitution: Perspectives on the Litigation and its Legacy (2006), have celebrated these lawsuits as a model for international human rights. Neuborne has extolled the litigation as the dawn of an era of “lex Americana,” in which multinational corporations (MNCs) have ...


Competition And Corporate Law: A Dialogue - The Bangor Punta And Santa Fe Options, Jan Ginter Deutsch Jan 1977

Competition And Corporate Law: A Dialogue - The Bangor Punta And Santa Fe Options, Jan Ginter Deutsch

Faculty Scholarship Series

In this imaginary dialogue between the economist and the lawyer, both attempt to analyze the recent decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court, applying the norms of their respective disciplines, and seek to derive a principle that would assist in formulating a course of action for the future. To those brought up in the classic tradition of Anglo-American law, the para­ meters employed to reach a decision in these cases may not be entirely intelligible. However, the determination of the applicable principle in the milieu of the current shift of the frontiers of law needs not only ...


Perlman V. Feldmann: A Case Study In Contemporary Corporate Legal History, Jan Ginter Deutsch Jan 1974

Perlman V. Feldmann: A Case Study In Contemporary Corporate Legal History, Jan Ginter Deutsch

Faculty Scholarship Series

When I was a law student, taking a course in introductory corporate law, what was heard around the halls was that most of corporate law would be learned if one understood Perlman v. Feldmann. I agree with that statement, and I have agreed more strongly each year I myself have taught introductory corporate law. Indeed, I now believe one would also learn a good deal about the significance of the corporation in American life during the past two decades. Unfortunately, however, it seems to me-on the basis of having read everything of which I was aware concerning one of the ...


Treaties And Executive Agreements A Reply, Edwin Borchard Jan 1945

Treaties And Executive Agreements A Reply, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

The authors of the articles under reply, Messrs. McDougal and Lans, have, like McClure, essayed to show that the treaty and the executive agreement are interchangeable, and, since executive agreements are simpler to conclude, they advocate disregarding as obsolete the treaty-making power, requiring, as it does, the consent of two thirds of the Senate, and substituting for it the use of the executive agreement. In that demand they differ radically from the constitutional conclusions which the writer, as well as many other students of the subject, have reached. To give their proposal a more “democratic” tinge, the authors propose what ...