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Legal History Commons

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Articles 1 - 12 of 12

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Interview With E. Norman Veasey, Andrew Edelstein, E. Norman Veasey, Legal Oral History Project, University Of Pennsylvania Law School Nov 1999

Interview With E. Norman Veasey, Andrew Edelstein, E. Norman Veasey, Legal Oral History Project, University Of Pennsylvania Law School

Legal Oral History Project

For transcript, click the Download button above. For video index, click the link below.

E. Norman Veasey (L '57) practiced at the firm of Richards, Layton & Finger from 1958 to 1992. In 1992 he was appointed Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Delaware, where he served until 2004.


Their Pride And Ornament: Judge Benjamin Johnson And The Federal Courts In Early Arkansas, Lynn Foster Oct 1999

Their Pride And Ornament: Judge Benjamin Johnson And The Federal Courts In Early Arkansas, Lynn Foster

University of Arkansas at Little Rock Law Review

No abstract provided.


Interview With Judge Arlin M. Adams, Sarah Barringer Gordon, Arlin M. Adams, Legal Oral History Project, University Of Pennsylvania Law School Jul 1999

Interview With Judge Arlin M. Adams, Sarah Barringer Gordon, Arlin M. Adams, Legal Oral History Project, University Of Pennsylvania Law School

Legal Oral History Project

For transcript, click the Download button above. For video index, click the link below.

Arlin M. Adams (L '47) served as a justice of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit from 1969 until his retirement in 1987, when he returned to private practice. He was later involved in a number of significant legal cases. He died in 2015.


Chief Justice Marshall In The Context Of His Times, R. Kent Newmyer Jul 1999

Chief Justice Marshall In The Context Of His Times, R. Kent Newmyer

Faculty Articles and Papers

No abstract provided.


Interview With Judge Dolores Sloviter, Catharine L. Krieps, Dolores Sloviter, Legal Oral History Project, University Of Pennsylvania Law School Apr 1999

Interview With Judge Dolores Sloviter, Catharine L. Krieps, Dolores Sloviter, Legal Oral History Project, University Of Pennsylvania Law School

Legal Oral History Project

For transcript, click the Download button above. For video index, click the link below.

Dolores Sloviter (L '56) is a Senior Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. She is the first woman appointed to that court and the only woman to have served as its Chief Judge.


Is The Excessive Fines Clause Excessively Kind To Money Launderers, Drug Dealers, And Tax Evaders, 33 J. Marshall L. Rev. 243 (1999), Ann Jennings Maron Jan 1999

Is The Excessive Fines Clause Excessively Kind To Money Launderers, Drug Dealers, And Tax Evaders, 33 J. Marshall L. Rev. 243 (1999), Ann Jennings Maron

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Taking Decisions Seriously, Richard D. Friedman Jan 1999

Taking Decisions Seriously, Richard D. Friedman

Reviews

The New Deal era is one of the great turning points of American constitutional history. The receptivity of the Supreme Court to regulation by state and federal governments increased dra- matically during that period. The constitutionalism that prevailed before Charles Evans Hughes became Chief Justice in 1930 was similar in most respects to that of the beginning of the twen- tieth century. The constitutionalism that prevailed by the time Hughes’ successor Harlan Fiske Stone died in 1946 is far more related to that of the end of the century. How this transformation occurred is a crucial and enduring issue in ...


Too Much (Legislation) Is Never Enough: Utilizing A Court's Equity Power To Enjoin Lawful Firearm Sales, 32 J. Marshall L. Rev. 1225 (1999), Edward G. Renner Jan 1999

Too Much (Legislation) Is Never Enough: Utilizing A Court's Equity Power To Enjoin Lawful Firearm Sales, 32 J. Marshall L. Rev. 1225 (1999), Edward G. Renner

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


What Spending Clause? - (Or The President's Paramour): An Examination Of The Views Of Hamilton, Madison, And Story On Article I, Section 8, Clause 1 Of The United States Constitution, 33 J. Marshall L. Rev. 81 (1999), Jeffrey T. Renz Jan 1999

What Spending Clause? - (Or The President's Paramour): An Examination Of The Views Of Hamilton, Madison, And Story On Article I, Section 8, Clause 1 Of The United States Constitution, 33 J. Marshall L. Rev. 81 (1999), Jeffrey T. Renz

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Discontinuous Tradition Of Sentencing Discretion: Koon's Failure To Recognize The Reshaping Of Judicial Discretion Under The Guidelines, The, Ian Weinstein Jan 1999

Discontinuous Tradition Of Sentencing Discretion: Koon's Failure To Recognize The Reshaping Of Judicial Discretion Under The Guidelines, The, Ian Weinstein

Faculty Scholarship

Can a judge exercise discretion and follow the law? Some think it impossible, seeing discretion as the opposite of law. Others have harmonized the two ideas, viewing discretion as the exercise of judgment according to and within the bounds of the law. Those who decry judicial discretion urge legislatures to enact more specific laws and leave less room for the vice of inconsistent results. Those who defend discretion would channel it to achieve the virtue of individualized justice. The tension between individualization and uniformity in the law is often unnecessarily heightened by an inadequate analysis of judicial discretion. The exercise ...


The Architecture Of Judicial Independence, Stephen B. Burbank Jan 1999

The Architecture Of Judicial Independence, Stephen B. Burbank

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Understanding The Limits Of Power: Judicial Restraint In General Jurisdiction Court Systems, Justice Philip A. Talmadge Jan 1999

Understanding The Limits Of Power: Judicial Restraint In General Jurisdiction Court Systems, Justice Philip A. Talmadge

Seattle University Law Review

This Article draws on my legislative and judicial background to focus both on the tendency of the courts to exceed their core constitutional role and the implications of such judicial activism. This article contend that modern courts of general jurisdiction are too often embroiled in sociopolitical controversies best left to the political branches of government. Part I addresses the concept of judicial restraint in our constitutional system and the need to define the core powers of the judicial branch of government. Part II discusses principles of judicial restraint in the federal courts. Part III, using the example of Washington State ...