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Full-Text Articles in Legal History

The Faces Of The Second Amendment Outside The Home, Take Three: Critiquing The Circuit Courts Use Of History-In-Law, Patrick J. Charles Apr 2019

The Faces Of The Second Amendment Outside The Home, Take Three: Critiquing The Circuit Courts Use Of History-In-Law, Patrick J. Charles

Cleveland State Law Review

This article seeks to critique the circuit courts’ varying history-in-law approaches, as well as to provide advice on the proper role that history-in-law plays when examining the scope of the Second Amendment outside the home. This article sets forth to accomplish this task in three parts. Part I argues why history-in-law is appropriate when adjudicating Second Amendment decisions outside the home. Part II examines the benefits and burdens of utilizing history-in-law as a method of constitutional interpretation, while breaking down the alternative approaches employed by circuit courts when adjudicating Second Amendment decisions outside the home. Lastly, Part III offers practical ...


Athenian Law, Laura E. Ray Jan 2018

Athenian Law, Laura E. Ray

Law Library Research Guides - Archived

No abstract provided.


Inseparable: Perspective Of Senator Daniel Webster, Ernest M. Oleksy Dec 2017

Inseparable: Perspective Of Senator Daniel Webster, Ernest M. Oleksy

The Downtown Review

Considering the hypersensitivity that their nation has towards race relations, it is often ineffable to contemporary Americans as to how anyone could have argued against abolition in the 19th century. However, by taking the perspective of Senator Daniel Webster speaking to an audience of disunionist-abolitionists, proslaveryites, and various shades of moderates, numerous points of contention will be brought to light as to why chattel slavery persisted so long in the U.S. Focal points of dialogue will include the Narrative of Frederick Douglass, the "positive good" claims of Senator John C. Calhoun, the disunionism of William Lloyd Garrison, and the ...


Justice William J. Brennan, Jr., James Wilson, And The Pursuit Of Equality And Liberty, Deborah A. Roy Jan 2013

Justice William J. Brennan, Jr., James Wilson, And The Pursuit Of Equality And Liberty, Deborah A. Roy

Cleveland State Law Review

This Article analyzes the jurisprudence of one of the most transformative Supreme Court Justices, William J. Brennan, Jr., from the perspective of his vision that the United States Constitution is founded on Human Dignity. Justice Brennan expressed this principle in his opinions that advanced the realization of individual rights for each and every American. The principle of human dignity invokes the values of equality and liberty. The article shows that Justice Brennan traced the principle of human dignity back to the Founding Fathers and the constitutional government that they established. Rather than being unhinged from the Constitution as his critics ...


Teaching American Legal History In A Law School, Peter D. Garlock Jan 2013

Teaching American Legal History In A Law School, Peter D. Garlock

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Professor Peter Garlock describes his legal history course.


Lincoln: The Constitution And The Civil War: An Exhibition, Laura E. Ray Dec 2011

Lincoln: The Constitution And The Civil War: An Exhibition, Laura E. Ray

Law Library Research Guides - Archived

January 4 - February 17, 2012, the C|M|Law Library hosts the traveling exhibition Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War, an examination of how President Lincoln used the Constitution to confront three intertwined crises of the Civil War - the secession of Southern states, slavery, and wartime civil liberties. The materials highlighted in this guide offer opportunities to further explore the exhibition's themes and assess how Lincoln’s struggles still resonate with constitutional issues today.

The traveling exhibition was organized by the National Constitution Center and the American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office, and made possible by a ...


Civil War & Antebellum Era Primary Materials, Laura E. Ray Jan 2008

Civil War & Antebellum Era Primary Materials, Laura E. Ray

Law Library Research Guides - Archived

This guide provides links to documents, reports, newspapers, journals, letters, diaries, maps, photographs, images of realia, and other primary materials from the Antebellum and Civil War era in the United States. For additional information and resources concerning this era, consult the Slavery & Reconstruction Law Research Guide and Legal History Research Guide.


The Founders And Slavery, Arthur R. Landever Nov 2006

The Founders And Slavery, Arthur R. Landever

Law Faculty Presentations and Testimony

The point of my talk is that our founders, who our tradition praises profusely of course, as men on Mount Olympus, had moral blinders on. I'm going to talk about key founders. Then I'm going to talk about the key English case, decided in 1772, Somerset v. Stuart. Then I'm going to talk about the Compromises of the 1770s and 1780s. Then I'm going to talk about what we can and can't learn from history. Then I'm going to consider what our generation is doing in the 21st century, considering what might shock our ...


Race, Nation-Building And Legal Transculturation During The Haitian Unification Period (1822-1844): Towards A Dominican Perspective, Charles R. Venator Santiago Jan 2005

Race, Nation-Building And Legal Transculturation During The Haitian Unification Period (1822-1844): Towards A Dominican Perspective, Charles R. Venator Santiago

Cleveland State Law Review

This paper offers some preliminary reflections on the relationship between law, race, and nation building during the Haitian unification period. My contention is that, while the Haitian occupation can be described as a domination of Santo Domingo, it is also possible to discern some important ways in which Dominicans benefited from this relationship. More importantly, I suggest that there are some important moments where Dominicans participate in the Haitian nation building process. This paper also draws on a critical reading of Fernando Ortiz's notion of legal transculturation as articulated in his book, Cuban Counterpoint, to reflect on the multiple ...


When Literature Becomes Law: An Example From Ancient Greece, Mark J. Sundahl Jan 2005

When Literature Becomes Law: An Example From Ancient Greece, Mark J. Sundahl

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

The subject of this paper is the peculiar Athenian law, generally referred to as the Testamentary Law, which permitted a will to be invalidated if a jury determined that the testator composed the will while "under the influence of a woman" (in the original Greek, gunaiki peithomenos). While scholars have long argued that the progressive ideas of the archaic poets of ancient Greece inspired political change - such as the emergence of democracy in Athens - this paper makes an even stronger claim regarding the connection between law and literature in ancient Greece. This paper proposes that Solon, the famous Athenian legislator ...


Who Was William Marbury?, David F. Forte Jan 2003

Who Was William Marbury?, David F. Forte

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

Of all the disappointed office seekers in American history, only William Marbury has been so honored as to have his portrait hung in the chambers of the United States Supreme Court alongside that of James Madison. The two titular protagonists to the Marbury v. Madison dispute had no idea that their original contretemps would ever find its way to litigation, let alone eventual mythic significance as the foundation stone of judicial review.


Life, Death And The Law - And Why Capital Punishment Is Legally Insupportable , Peter Fitzpatrick Jan 1999

Life, Death And The Law - And Why Capital Punishment Is Legally Insupportable , Peter Fitzpatrick

Cleveland State Law Review

Given that law has an integral commitment to life, in this lecture I want to show how the law should manifest something of a fundamental dissonance, even a terminal incoherence, when law is called upon to deal death. That is what happens in the judicial discourse on the death penalty in the United States. I will approach this demonstration in a way that may at first seem paradoxical, in a way that will bring out the deep affinity between law and death. That affinity is one in which death is, in a sense, the limit of law; a limit that ...


Spiritual Equality, The Black Codes, And The Americanization Of The Freedmen, David F. Forte Jan 1998

Spiritual Equality, The Black Codes, And The Americanization Of The Freedmen, David F. Forte

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

The notion of spiritual equality grew from the abolitionist movement - the precursor for the political ideology of the radical Republicans. The radical Republicans did not think one could achieve the acceptance of spiritual equality through forced material equality. [I]t was a religious revival that brought our country to confront the reality of slavery. It was a theological doctrine from which we derived our notion of equality in the Reconstruction Amendments. And in that era, the free-thinkers - the secularists of the age - were temporizers on the issue. They were simply of no use in the raising to liberty of three ...


Suspending The Rule Of Law - Temporary Immunity As Violative Of Montesquieu's Republican Virtue As Embodied In George Washington, Joseph P. Rodgers Jan 1997

Suspending The Rule Of Law - Temporary Immunity As Violative Of Montesquieu's Republican Virtue As Embodied In George Washington, Joseph P. Rodgers

Cleveland State Law Review

This Note offers a somewhat unique perspective on the notion of clemency. This inquiry contemplates the merit of temporary immunity from civil suits for acts which eventuated outside the scope of one's official responsibilities and argues that such an unprecedented expansion of civil immunity is antithetical to Montesquieu's conception of public virtue as evinced in The Spirit of Laws. This Note also reflects on the iconic role of Washington at the Constitutional Convention as emblematic of quintessential republican virtue. Part II briefly traces the evolution of absolute, qualified, and temporary immunity from an historical perspective. Part III acclimates ...


Challenges In Judging: Some Insights From The Writings Of Moses, Gordon J. Beggs Jan 1996

Challenges In Judging: Some Insights From The Writings Of Moses, Gordon J. Beggs

Cleveland State Law Review

Starting with the idea that Judeo-Christian principles played a significant role in the development of American legal ethics, the author uses the writings of Moses as a lens to examine some challenges in judging. Moses authored the first five books of the Old Testament known as the Pentateuch or books of the law-Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. The author begins by suggesting a caveat and an approach to interpretation. When examining the writings of Moses, we are not necessarily seeking a literal application. He suggests instead, that when looking at the writings of Moses, three questions should be answered ...


The Struggle Over The Past, Robert W. Gordon Jan 1996

The Struggle Over The Past, Robert W. Gordon

Cleveland State Law Review

History supplies a set of basic ground rules; the "traditional principles of the common law," from which much modem law, both judge-made and statutory law, is seen as having improperly deviated. As the New Right ideology spreads among elite decision-makers and intellectuals, it poses a serious challenge to the Progressive-liberal consensus about the legal meanings of history that had previously dominated American legal thought for a very long time. The historical claims of New Right ideology in particular have touched off a number of fierce debates among Old (Progressive) Liberal, New Right, and radical legal intellectuals. In Section II, the ...


Marbury's Travail: Federalist Politics And William Marbury's Appointment As Justice Of The Peace, David F. Forte Jan 1996

Marbury's Travail: Federalist Politics And William Marbury's Appointment As Justice Of The Peace, David F. Forte

Law Faculty Articles and Essays

This Article describes how Marbury, the youngest son of an impoverished remnant of a well-known family, elbowed his way to wealth and influence among the Maryland gentry. Further, this Article illuminates Marbury's choice between the two wings of the Federalist party in Maryland - the Hamiltonian elite and the Adams' loyalists - and how Marbury's partisan service brought him to a position earning Thomas Jefferson's disdain and rebuff. In the end, Marbury's appointment and rejection derived from the very different characters of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson.


The Seventeenth-Century Revolution In The English Land Law, Charles J. Reid Jr. Jan 1995

The Seventeenth-Century Revolution In The English Land Law, Charles J. Reid Jr.

Cleveland State Law Review

It is the purpose of this Article to explore systematically the creation of the new system of land law in the seventeenth century. The Article opens with a brief introduction to some of the major events of the seventeenth century to assist readers unfamiliar with this period. Successive sections will then treat the abolition of the feudal tenures and the adoption of socage tenure, the defeat of copy hold and the triumph of the enclosure movement, the creation of the rule against perpetuities and the strict settlement, and the creation of the modem trust and mortgage instruments.


The Responsibility Of Lawyers To Challenge Injustice, Geoff Budlender Jan 1992

The Responsibility Of Lawyers To Challenge Injustice, Geoff Budlender

Cleveland State Law Review

Jotham Zwane is a respected community leader in Amsterdam, a small country town in South Africa. I could talk for a long time about the truly remarkable Jotham Zwane and his experiences. But in the present context, what is particularly striking about this part of his story is what it tells us about lawyers and their responsibilities. In the first place, the story reminds us of the classic role of the lawyer: to stand between the individual and the state. The second lesson which emerges from the story is a question about the role of lawyers in an unjust system ...


The Justice Mission Of American Law Schools, David Barnhizer Jan 1992

The Justice Mission Of American Law Schools, David Barnhizer

Cleveland State Law Review

Justice has been seen by many scholars as a premise about which much can be said but virtually nothing either proved or disproved through the application of the methodologies that provide the grounding for science. While justice is undeniably representative of a slippery and evasive set of concepts, it paradoxically reflects the fundamental values of Western society without which we cannot hold together the thin tissue of political organization that we call the "Rule of Law." As is described in the latter part of this article, justice is in fact a simple meta-principle, one about which we need not be ...


The Matrix Of The Common Law, George L. Haskins Jan 1991

The Matrix Of The Common Law, George L. Haskins

Cleveland State Law Review

Great men have admonished us never to forget the continuing relevance of history in the Anglo-American legal system. We are cautioned to remember that the highly individualistic character of much of our law is explained by its Germanic rather than its Roman roots and, further, that the Anglo-American system has built upon countervailing concepts of relationships which are feudal in origin, and to which rights and duties attach without regard to the will of individuals, which is the underlying principle of classical Roman law. Thus, in our law, powers, rights, and duties stem from relationships such as principal-agent, vendor-purchaser, landlord-tenant ...


Natural Law As Practical Methodology: A Finnisian Analysis Of City Of Richmond V. J. A. Croson, Co., David Barnhizer Jan 1990

Natural Law As Practical Methodology: A Finnisian Analysis Of City Of Richmond V. J. A. Croson, Co., David Barnhizer

Cleveland State Law Review

The first part of this article examines some of the main features of Finnis's theory of natural law. It suggests that Finnis offers a "soft" theory of natural law anchored in a richer and more realistic conception of human nature than has generally characterized natural law theory. It brings forth the role of Aristotelian practicality in Finnis's thinking. Finally, the first part of the article discusses the roles of what Finnis calls basic human goods, attempting to suggest how the particular basic human goods he advances intuitively provide an important component of a framework for a more realistic ...


Incommensurable Values, Rational Choice, And Moral Absolutes, David Luban Jan 1990

Incommensurable Values, Rational Choice, And Moral Absolutes, David Luban

Cleveland State Law Review

My comments in this paper are directed to just one argument, or rather one cluster of arguments, deployed by John Finnis in just three pages of Natural Law and Legal Reasoning. I am referring to Finnis's argument that the goods and bad at stake in legal, moral and political choice are incommensurable, and to the conclusions he draws from this argument. I will argue that while the incommensurability thesis is true, that is so for reasons somewhat different than those Finnis advances (section I); that in its most common form the incommensurability thesis does not in all cases imply ...


The Rule Of Law And The Rule Of Laws, David F. Forte Jan 1990

The Rule Of Law And The Rule Of Laws, David F. Forte

Cleveland State Law Review

The thesis of this article is that, for the Rule of Law to be maintained in a modern technological society, the legal system must affirmatively tolerate a range of justifiable non-compliance. I begin with a rather strong definition of the Rule of Law, one that encompasses not merely the procedural desiderata of Lon Fuller, but also the notion that the Rule of Law has a substantive content (the common good) and that it necessarily binds the rulers as well as the ruled. I posit as an opposite phenomenon to the Rule of Law, the rule of laws, or the term ...


A Critical Legal Studies Perspective, Mark Tushnet Jan 1990

A Critical Legal Studies Perspective, Mark Tushnet

Cleveland State Law Review

In this comment I want to address two points suggested by Professor Finnis's essay "Natural Law and Legal Reasoning." I say "suggested by" deliberately, for I do not want to attribute the points in their full force to him, although I believe that his essay lends itself to a reading in which those points would be given their full force. The points deal with the question of "easy questions" and what Professor Finnis calls the "sufficient and necessarily artificial clarity and definiteness" that yields answers to such questions, and with the way in which legal professionals are likely to ...


The Virtues Of Redundancy In Legal Thought, Randy E. Barnett Jan 1990

The Virtues Of Redundancy In Legal Thought, Randy E. Barnett

Cleveland State Law Review

Redundancy has a bad reputation among legal intellectuals. My interest in the virtues of redundancy grows out of my interest in the social function of the liberal conception of justice and the rule of law. In this essay, I propose that legal theorists pay serious attention to the concept of redundancy used by engineers. I explain how redundancy-in this special sense-is essential to any intellectual enterprise in which we try to reach action-guiding conclusions, including the enterprise of law. I will describe the virtues of redundancy in legal thought. I want to explain why it is useful to rely on ...


Whose Nature - Practical Reason And Patriarchy, Lynne Henderson Jan 1990

Whose Nature - Practical Reason And Patriarchy, Lynne Henderson

Cleveland State Law Review

My comments on John Finnis's Natural Law and Legal Reasoning grow out my concern about the relationship of law to authoritarianism. In this comment, I do not intend to go deeply into the relationship of law to authoritarianism but rather to sketch out the background of the argument. It seems to me that authoritarianism, properly understood, is of great relevance to a symposium on jurisprudence and legal reasoning, because at a minimum, authoritarianism overlaps with legality's ethic of rule-following and obedience to authority. Authoritarian attitudes about authority and morality also are relevant to the jurisprudential concern with the ...


Concluding Reflections, John Finnis Jan 1990

Concluding Reflections, John Finnis

Cleveland State Law Review

A symposium to which one person contributes three extended papers is no unmixed pleasure for readers. This third contribution of mine will interest only those curious to see my response to other symposiasts' comments on my earlier efforts (in the symposium and elsewhere). To enable this curiosity to be satisfied as costlessly as possible, I divide these concluding reflections by authors rather than themes, though with priorities suggested by themes rather than authors.


Natural Law And Legal Reasoning Natural Law, John Finnis Jan 1990

Natural Law And Legal Reasoning Natural Law, John Finnis

Cleveland State Law Review

In sum: Much academic theory about legal reasoning greatly exaggerates the extent to which reason can settle what is greater good or lesser evil, and minimizes the need for authoritative sources which, so far as they are clear and respect the few absolute moral rights and duties, are to be respected as the only rational basis for judicial reasoning and decision, in relation to the countless issues which do not directly involve those absolute rights and duties. A natural law theory in the classical tradition makes no pretense that natural reason can determine the one right answer to those countless ...


Justification In The Killing Of An Innocent Person, John Makdisi Jan 1990

Justification In The Killing Of An Innocent Person, John Makdisi

Cleveland State Law Review

It is appropriate to call Finnis' approach to life as an incommensurable basic human good a natural law approach. It suggests that there is more to life than just an accumulation of wealth, happiness, value, etc. There is something about life that we cannot value, that we cannot measure, that we cannot fathom, that is mysterious. While contract and even some tort law are readily adaptable to arguments of economic efficiency, there are areas where such arguments do not belong. Specifically, where the end result cannot be measured because the values at stake are incommensurable, there may be no best ...