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Articles 1 - 16 of 16

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

From Valladolid To Venezuela : The Legacy Of Las Casas, Vitoria, And Sepúlveda In The Current Venezuelan Crisis., C. Evan Clark May 2020

From Valladolid To Venezuela : The Legacy Of Las Casas, Vitoria, And Sepúlveda In The Current Venezuelan Crisis., C. Evan Clark

College of Arts & Sciences Senior Honors Theses

This thesis analyzes the current Venezuelan crisis and the international legal questions it has posed concerning sovereignty, the responsibility to protect, and international efforts to influence a state’s internal politics. In particular, the thesis expounds the historical and theoretical context behind international legal principles that governments, international organizations, and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) have invoked in favor of Juan Guaidó or Nicolás Maduro. The thesis’s analysis centers around its examination of the parallels between the international legal principles that relate to the Venezuelan crisis and the political and ethical arguments of the sixteenth-century Spanish social reformer Bartolomé de las ...


The Supreme "Courts" Of The Roman Empire, C.G. Bateman Jan 2018

The Supreme "Courts" Of The Roman Empire, C.G. Bateman

C.G. Bateman

Question
Why and how did Constantine go further than merely tolerating Christianity, and put himself at the head of their affairs and legislate Christian bishops into the position of Roman judges whose decisions were not subject to appeal? What effect did the rescript of 333 have on the meaning of the earlier edict of 318, and why is this important?[1]
 
Constantine, the Roman Emperor from 315-337, was a law-giver who first put the Christian Church in the place of primacy in the organization of the state that it only lost as recently as the seventeenth century; as such, he ...


Oil Under Troubled Waters?: Some Legal Aspects Of The Boundary Dispute Between Malawi And Tanzania Over Lake Malawi, Tiyanjana Maluwa Apr 2016

Oil Under Troubled Waters?: Some Legal Aspects Of The Boundary Dispute Between Malawi And Tanzania Over Lake Malawi, Tiyanjana Maluwa

Michigan Journal of International Law

This article examines the legal aspects of the respective claims by the two claimants to the northeastern stretches of the lake: to the eastern shoreline by Malawi and to the median line by Tanzania. Maluwa proceeds as follows. First, the Article sketches out the historical and political background of the dispute and examines some preliminary legal issues in Part I. Part II discusses the legal significance of boundaries, state succession to boundary treaties, and the relevance of post-colonial African state practice in this respect. A central aspect of this practice is the adoption by African states of the principle of ...


Panel Iii: General Discussion, Georgia Journal Of International And Comparative Law Apr 2015

Panel Iii: General Discussion, Georgia Journal Of International And Comparative Law

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


The Scottish Independence Referendum And The Principles Of Democratic Secession, Benjamin Levites Jan 2015

The Scottish Independence Referendum And The Principles Of Democratic Secession, Benjamin Levites

Brooklyn Journal of International Law

On September 18, 2014, Scottish voters decided whether to sever the 307 years of unity between Scotland and the United Kingdom in an independence referendum. While the voters ultimately rejected independence, the process by which the Scots accomplished this historic exercise will inform further democratic secession movements.

This Note examines the significant implications of Scotland’s independence referendum by assessing the history of independence referendums and the present scope of relevant international law. The formative history of the independence referendum and modern precedential examples established the requirements for democratic secession. In turn, the Scottish independence referendum, in the context of ...


Political Community In Carl Schmitt's International Legal Thinking, Markus Gunneflo Dec 2014

Political Community In Carl Schmitt's International Legal Thinking, Markus Gunneflo

Markus Gunneflo

A distinctive feature of Carl Schmitt’s legal thinking is the pivotal role that he grants political community. Against the background of Schmitt’s particular conception of political community and the importance placed on its protection in a domestic law setting; this text highlights the imperative role of political community in Schmitt’s thinking on questions of international law. By consistently relating Schmitt’s work on international law to his own time but also stretching it into our own, the text argues that while Schmitt’s insistence on political community may come across as parochial in present times of globalization ...


Can International Law Survive The 21st Century - Yes: With Patience, Persistence, And A Peek At The Past, Dana Zartner Falstrom May 2007

Can International Law Survive The 21st Century - Yes: With Patience, Persistence, And A Peek At The Past, Dana Zartner Falstrom

San Diego International Law Journal

With the end of the Cold War-the principal international political framework that shaped the international system since the end of WWII-an increasing number of global tensions have arisen which have brought to the fore questions about the ability of existing international law to provide a guiding framework for state behavior. Debates over the limits of state sovereignty, the appropriateness of humanitarian intervention, the justness of pre-emptive war, the definition of self-defense, the legality of replacing a government in the interests of your ideals, and how to deal with terrorism have dominated discussions around the world. Moreover, these discussions have caused ...


Perspectives On Post-Conflict Constitutionalism: Reflections On Regime Change Through External Constitutionalization, Ulrich K. Preuss Jan 2006

Perspectives On Post-Conflict Constitutionalism: Reflections On Regime Change Through External Constitutionalization, Ulrich K. Preuss

NYLS Law Review

No abstract provided.


Remarks By An Idealist On The Realism Of 'The Limits Of International Law', Kenneth Anderson Jan 2006

Remarks By An Idealist On The Realism Of 'The Limits Of International Law', Kenneth Anderson

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

This paper is a response to Jack L. Goldsmith and Eric A. Posner, 'The Limits of International Law' (Oxford 2005), part of a symposium on the book held at the University of Georgia Law School in October 2005. The review views 'The Limits of International Law' sympathetically, and focuses on the intersection between traditional and new methodologies of international law scholarship, on the one hand, and the substantive political commitments that differing international law scholars hold, on the other. The paper notes that some in the symposium claim that the problem with 'The Limits of International Law' is that it ...


Sovereignty And The American Courts At The Cocktail Party Of International Law: The Dangers Of Domestic Invocations Of Foreign And International Law, Donald J. Kochan Dec 2005

Sovereignty And The American Courts At The Cocktail Party Of International Law: The Dangers Of Domestic Invocations Of Foreign And International Law, Donald J. Kochan

Donald J. Kochan

With increasing frequency and heightened debate, United States courts have been citing foreign and “international” law as authority for domestic decisions. This trend is inappropriate, undemocratic, and dangerous. The trend touches on fundamental concepts of sovereignty, democracy, the judicial role, and overall issues of effective governance. There are multiple problems with the judiciary’s reliance on extraterritorial and extra-constitutional foreign or international sources to guide their decisions. Perhaps the most fundamental flaw is its interference with rule of law values. To borrow from Judge Harold Levanthal, the use of international sources in judicial decision-making might be described as “the equivalent ...


National Identity And Liberalism In International Law: Three Models, Justin Desautels-Stein Jan 2005

National Identity And Liberalism In International Law: Three Models, Justin Desautels-Stein

Articles

No abstract provided.


Two Case Studies In Self-Determination: The Rock And The Bailiwick, Inge V. Porter May 2003

Two Case Studies In Self-Determination: The Rock And The Bailiwick, Inge V. Porter

San Diego International Law Journal

After looking at the concept of self-determination, its history, meaning, and possible future development in Part II, this Paper will develop two case studies. Part III examines the right of self-determination for the people of Gibraltar, analyzing the relevant U.N. resolutions, agreements, treaties, and legislation that have defined the dispute between Great Britain and Spain. For example, Great Britain has ruled the Rock of Gibraltar for 280 years, primarily using it as a military base; but, today, Spain insists that it did not relinquish absolute sovereignty over Gibraltar to the British by the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713. Part ...


Sovereignty: The State, The Individual, And The International Legal System In The Twenty First Century, Ronald A. Brand Jan 2002

Sovereignty: The State, The Individual, And The International Legal System In The Twenty First Century, Ronald A. Brand

Articles

This essay proposes that an understanding of original concepts of sovereignty both helps explain twentieth century developments in international law and provides a proper context for coming changes in the ways in which persons relate to states, states relate to states within the international legal system, and ultimately and most importantly-the way international law affects and applies to persons. The most important developments in international law in the new century are likely not to be in state-state relationships but rather in the status and rights of the person in international law. The twentieth century process of globalization brought us back ...


Toward The Enforcement Of Universal Human Rights Through Abrogation Of The Rule Of Non-Inquiry In Extradition, Richard J. Wilson Jan 1997

Toward The Enforcement Of Universal Human Rights Through Abrogation Of The Rule Of Non-Inquiry In Extradition, Richard J. Wilson

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

No abstract provided.


The Neo-Positivist Concept Of International Law, Anthony D'Amato Jan 1965

The Neo-Positivist Concept Of International Law, Anthony D'Amato

Faculty Working Papers

The question "Is international law really law?" has not proved troublesome, according to Hart, because "a trivial question about the meaning of words has been mistaken for a serious question about the nature of things." Hart defends international law in Bentham's terms as "sufficiently analogous" to municipal law. It is important to see in what way this analogy is viewed by Hart in order to determine whether the reasoning he offers is too high a price to pay for accepting a neo-positivist into the circle of those who hold that international law is really law.


Relation Between International Law And Municipal Law, Edwin Borchard Jan 1940

Relation Between International Law And Municipal Law, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

Recent events on this continent make it seem appropriate once more to discuss the much – debated question of the relation between international law and municipal law. For one school, the dualists, municipal law prevails in case of conflict; for the other school, the monists international law prevails. There are two special features about the debate which warrant mention: first, that while the disputants do not widely differ in the ultimate solution of practical problems, they do differ considerably in their major premises and in the resulting theories; and second, that the attempt of various countries on occasion to escape the ...