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Law and Philosophy

2015

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Articles 1 - 20 of 20

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Legal Epistemologies, Howard Schweber Dec 2015

Legal Epistemologies, Howard Schweber

Maryland Law Review

No abstract provided.


Creating Kairos At The Supreme Court: Shelby County, Citizens United, Hobby Lobby, And The Judicial Construction Of Right Moments, Linda L. Berger Oct 2015

Creating Kairos At The Supreme Court: Shelby County, Citizens United, Hobby Lobby, And The Judicial Construction Of Right Moments, Linda L. Berger

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

No abstract provided.


Liberalism, Radicalism, And Legal Scholarship, Steven H. Shiffrin Jun 2015

Liberalism, Radicalism, And Legal Scholarship, Steven H. Shiffrin

Steven H. Shiffrin

No abstract provided.


Afterword: Office And The Conduct Of The Minor Jurisprudent, Shaun Mcveigh Jun 2015

Afterword: Office And The Conduct Of The Minor Jurisprudent, Shaun Mcveigh

UC Irvine Law Review

No abstract provided.


History, Law, And Justice: Empirical Method And Conceptual Confusion In The History Of Law, Constantin Fasolt Jun 2015

History, Law, And Justice: Empirical Method And Conceptual Confusion In The History Of Law, Constantin Fasolt

UC Irvine Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Third Pillar Of Jurisprudence: Social Legal Theory, Brian Z. Tamanaha May 2015

The Third Pillar Of Jurisprudence: Social Legal Theory, Brian Z. Tamanaha

William & Mary Law Review

No abstract provided.


Knowledge, Recklessness And The Connection Requirement Between Actus Reus And Mens Rea, Alexander F. Sarch Jan 2015

Knowledge, Recklessness And The Connection Requirement Between Actus Reus And Mens Rea, Alexander F. Sarch

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

It is a foundational, but underappreciated principle of criminal liability that being guilty of a crime requires not only possessing the requisite mens rea and actus reus, but also that this mens rea be appropriately connected to the actus reus. That is, the former must concur with or “actuate” the latter. While there has been substantial discussion of the connection requirement as applied to the mens rea of intent, the meaning of this requirement as applied to knowledge and recklessness has received far less attention. In this paper, I consider one of the few sophisticated attempts to spell out the ...


Condoning The Crime: The Elusive Mens Rea For Complicity, Alexander F. Sarch Jan 2015

Condoning The Crime: The Elusive Mens Rea For Complicity, Alexander F. Sarch

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

There is a long history of disagreement about what the mens rea for complicity is. Some courts take it to be the intention that the underlying crime succeed, while others take mere knowledge of the underlying crime to be sufficient. Still others propose that the mens rea for complicity tracks the mens rea of the underlying crime — the so-called “derivative approach.” However, as argued herein, these familiar approaches face difficulties. Accordingly, we have reason to continue our search for the elusive mens rea for complicity. This paper develops a new account of the mens rea for complicity, drawing on an ...


Four Futures Of Legal Automation, Frank A. Pasquale, Glyn Cashwell Jan 2015

Four Futures Of Legal Automation, Frank A. Pasquale, Glyn Cashwell

Faculty Scholarship

Simple legal jobs (such as document coding) are prime candidates for legal automation. More complex tasks cannot be routinized. So far, the debate on the likely scope and intensity of legal automation has focused on the degree to which legal tasks are simple or complex. Just as important to the legal profession, however, is the degree of regulation or deregulation likely in the future.

Situations involving conflicting rights, unique fact patterns, and open-ended laws will remain excessively difficult to automate for an extended period of time. Deregulation, however, may effectively strip many persons of their rights, rendering once-hard cases simple ...


Corporate Law Doctrine And The Legacy Of American Legal Realism, Edward B. Rock Jan 2015

Corporate Law Doctrine And The Legacy Of American Legal Realism, Edward B. Rock

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

In this contribution to a symposium on "Legal Realism and Legal Doctrine," I examine the role that jurisprudence plays in corporate law doctrine. Through an examination of paired cases from the United States and United Kingdom, I offer a case study of the contrasting influence on corporate law judging of American Legal Realism versus traditional U.K. Doctrinalism.

Specialist judges in both systems, aided by specialist lawyers, clearly identify and understand the core policy issues involved in a dispute and arrive at sensible results. Adjusting for differences in background law and institutions, it seems likely that the disputes would ultimately ...


Salus Populi Suprema Lex Esto: Balancing Civil Liberties And Public Health Interventions In Modern Vaccination Policy, Phoebe E. Arde-Acquah Jan 2015

Salus Populi Suprema Lex Esto: Balancing Civil Liberties And Public Health Interventions In Modern Vaccination Policy, Phoebe E. Arde-Acquah

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

Vaccine policy still stirs up similar contentions and controversial sentiments today as it did in 1905 due to the enduring tension between public health interventions and individual liberties, between the rights of the individual and the claims of the collective. This Note considers the rationale for granting vaccine exemptions in one case, but withholding them in another; why one court gives substantial deference to state power regarding vaccination, and another demonstrates considerable regard for civil liberties in vaccine policy.

It has been suggested that pragmatism and political acuity, rather than a doctrinal adherence to epidemiological theory or ethical principles has ...


Punishment In The State Of Nature: John Locke And Criminal Punishment In The United States Of America, Matthew K. Suess Jan 2015

Punishment In The State Of Nature: John Locke And Criminal Punishment In The United States Of America, Matthew K. Suess

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

No abstract provided.


Two Dogmas Of Originalism, Ian Bartrum Jan 2015

Two Dogmas Of Originalism, Ian Bartrum

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

In the early 1950s, Willlard Quine’s Two Dogmas of Empiricism offered a devastating critique of logical positivism and the effort to distinguish “science” from “metaphysics.” Quine demonstrated that the positivists relied on dogmatic oversimplifications of both the world and human practices, and, in the end, suggested that our holistic natural experience cannot be reduced to purely logical explanations. In this piece, I argue that constitutional originalism—which, too, seeks to define a constitutional “science”—relies on similar dogmatisms. In particular, I contend that the “fixation thesis,” which claims that the constitutional judge’s first task is to fix the ...


The Origins Of The Pursuit Of Happiness, Carli N. Conklin Jan 2015

The Origins Of The Pursuit Of Happiness, Carli N. Conklin

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

Scholars have long struggled to define the meaning of the phrase “the pursuit of happiness” in the Declaration of Independence. The most common understandings suggest either that the phrase is a direct substitution for John Locke’s conception of property or that the phrase is a rhetorical flourish that conveys no substantive meaning. Yet, property and the pursuit of happiness were listed as distinct—not synonymous—rights in eighteenth-century writings. Furthermore, the very inclusion of “the pursuit of happiness” as one of only three unalienable rights enumerated in the Declaration suggests that the drafters must have meant something substantive when ...


Structure And Value In The Common Law, Shyamkrishna Balganesh, Gideon Parchomovsky Jan 2015

Structure And Value In The Common Law, Shyamkrishna Balganesh, Gideon Parchomovsky

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Legal concepts are seen today as archaic relics of the past, and as representing a largely dispensable feature of the common law. This Article challenges the widely accepted view of legal concepts as remnants of formalist thinking, and argues that legal concepts play a crucial role in ensuring the vitality and subsistence of the common law over time, place, and context. Legal concepts embody what we term “a duality of meaning,” which effects a separation between a concept’s analytical and normative meanings. The analytical (or structural) meaning of a concept is, at its core, well-defined and remains stable over ...


Reflections On Freedom And Criminal Responsibility In Late Twentieth Century American Legal Thought, Thomas A. Green, Merrill Catharine Hodnefield Jan 2015

Reflections On Freedom And Criminal Responsibility In Late Twentieth Century American Legal Thought, Thomas A. Green, Merrill Catharine Hodnefield

Articles

It is now a commonplace among historians that American criminal jurisprudence underwent a dramatic change something like two-thirds to three-quarters into the last century. Roughly, this development is understood as a shift (or drift) from a more-or-less pure consequentialism to a "mixed theory" wherein retributivism played a major-at times, dominant-role. As the new paradigm remains intact, now approaching a half-century, the development qualifies as a significant historical fact. The fact applies not only to the history of justification for punishment but also to conceptions of the underlying principle of (basis for) responsibility. The two are rightly distinguished: for many scholars ...


Time-Mindedness And Jurisprudence, David Luban Jan 2015

Time-Mindedness And Jurisprudence, David Luban

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Analytic jurisprudence often strikes outsiders as a discipline unto itself, unconnected with the problems that other legal scholarship investigates. Gerald Postema, in the article to which this paper responds, traces this “unsociability” to two narrowing defects in the project of analytic jurisprudence: (1) from Austin on, it has concerned itself largely with the analysis of professional concepts, without connecting that analysis with other disciplines that study law, nor with the history of jurisprudence itself, nor with general philosophy; (2) analytic jurisprudence studies only time-­‐slice legal systems, rather than legal systems unfolding in history. He argues that a time-­‐slice ...


Opportunism As Crucible: Rethinking Equity In View Of Reliance Interests And Legal Evolution, John Ehrett Dec 2014

Opportunism As Crucible: Rethinking Equity In View Of Reliance Interests And Legal Evolution, John Ehrett

John Ehrett

This Article offers and defends a nuanced definition of opportunism in the context of legal decision-making by differentiating between opportunism in the broad sense and the particularized phenomenon of cognizably malignant opportunism. It subsequently proceeds by developing a normative critique of the case for broader invocation of counter opportunistic equitable remedies, alongside a defense of the reliance and gap-filling functions performed by opportunistic actors. Centrally, I challenge the suggestion that the existence of opportunism in private law warrants a revival of the doctrines of ex post equity. I argue instead that opportunism serves an important structural purpose where the evolution ...


Economics-Based Environmentalism In The Fourth Generation Of Environmental Law, Donald J. Kochan Dec 2014

Economics-Based Environmentalism In The Fourth Generation Of Environmental Law, Donald J. Kochan

Donald J. Kochan

Environmental protection and economic concerns are not mutually exclusive. This article explores some of the issues of economic analysis that might arise as we approach the fourth generation of environmental law. It explains ways that economic analysis can be employed to generate the best environmental rules, including measures under what this article terms as "economics-based environmentalism." Economics-based environmentalism contends that the advantages of using economic principles within a “polycentric toolbox” of environmental law come from the benefits available in private ordering, markets, property rights, liability regimes and incentives structures that will better protect the environment than alternatives like state-based interventionist ...


The Great Alliance: History, Reason, And Will In Modern Law, Paulo Barrozo Dec 2014

The Great Alliance: History, Reason, And Will In Modern Law, Paulo Barrozo

Paulo Barrozo

This article offers an interpretation of the intellectual and political origins of modern law in the nineteenth century and its consequences for contemporary legal thought. Social theoretical analyses of law and legal thought tend to emphasize rupture and change. Histories of legal thought tend to draw a picture of strife between different schools of jurisprudence. Such analyses and histories fail to account for the extent to which present legal thought is the continuation of a jurisprudential settlement that occurred in the nineteenth century. That settlement tamed the will of the masses under the influence of authoritative legal thought, conceptions of ...