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Legal Education Commons

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The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

2003

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Legal Education

Law School Leviathan: Explaining Administrative Growth, Ronald A. Cass, John H. Garvey Jan 2003

Law School Leviathan: Explaining Administrative Growth, Ronald A. Cass, John H. Garvey

Scholarly Articles and Other Contributions

The administrative apparatus of American law schools - indeed, the entire infrastructure of American law schools - seems to be expanding without end. Soon, one would think, administrators must outnumber all other participants in the educational process. Or so it has been said.

Is this a fair characterization of the facts of legal education? If so, what explains this trend? Does it describe a problem or an inevitable, even desirable, state of affairs? We endeavor to answer these questions, looking at the evidence at our disposal and the kinds of speculation that deans can do on short notice.


Guidelines With Commentary For The Evaluation Of Legal Externship Programs, J.P. "Sandy" Ogilvy Jan 2003

Guidelines With Commentary For The Evaluation Of Legal Externship Programs, J.P. "Sandy" Ogilvy

Scholarly Articles and Other Contributions

This Article is part of a larger project to create a set of guidelines, with commentary, for the evaluation of clinical legal education programs. The Externship Guidelines ("Guidelines") are published here with the hope and expectation that the legal education community will read, analyze, and comment on them. As a result of that input, subsequent drafts of the Guidelines should reflect a broad consensus among legal educators with respect to the standards for good legal externship programs and a methodology for evaluating legal externship programs. It also is anticipated that working on guidelines in the discrete area of legal externships ...


Lawyering Process: My Thanks For The Book And The Movie, Leah Wortham Jan 2003

Lawyering Process: My Thanks For The Book And The Movie, Leah Wortham

Scholarly Articles and Other Contributions

The author's memories of "the movie version" of The Lawyering Process, two courses she took in Gary Bellow's first two years at Harvard Law School (1971-73), are compared to the text and problem supplements published in 1978. The author traces the influence of those courses and books on her externship course and textbook, written with others. She cites the value of Bellow & Moulton's pioneering employment of visual and kinesthetic learning modes and explicit statement to students about educational goals and methods. She identifies paradigms for lawyering tasks that have remained useful to her throughout her career. With ...