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Full-Text Articles in Law and Race

(Indigenous) Language As A Human Right, Kristen Carpenter, Alexey Tsykarev Jan 2020

(Indigenous) Language As A Human Right, Kristen Carpenter, Alexey Tsykarev

Articles

The United Nations General Assembly has proclaimed 2022-2032 as the International Decade of Indigenous Languages. Building on lessons of the International Year of Indigenous Languages of 2019, the Decade will "draw attention to the critical loss of indigenous languages and the urgent need to preserve, revitalize and promote indigenous languages." These actions are necessary, in part, because existing laws and policies have proven inadequate to redress the legacy of state suppression of indigenous languages or ensure nondiscrimination in contemporary usage. In light of the International Year and Decade, this Article explores the rights of indigenous peoples to "use, revitalize, and ...


Environmental Justice And The Possibilities For Environmental Law, Sarah Krakoff Jan 2019

Environmental Justice And The Possibilities For Environmental Law, Sarah Krakoff

Articles

Climate change and extreme inequality combine to cause disproportionate harms to poor communities throughout the world. Further, unequal resource allocation is shot through with the structures of racism and other forms of discrimination. This Essay explores these phenomena in two different places in the United States, and traces law’s role in constructing environmental and economic vulnerability. The Essay then proposes that solutions, if there are any to be had, lie in expanding our notions of what kinds of laws are relevant to achieving environmental justice, and in seeing law as a possible tactic for instigating broader social change but ...


Owning Red: A Theory Of Indian (Cultural) Appropriation, Angela R. Riley, Kristen A. Carpenter Jan 2016

Owning Red: A Theory Of Indian (Cultural) Appropriation, Angela R. Riley, Kristen A. Carpenter

Articles

In a number of recent controversies, from sports teams’ use of Indian mascots to the federal government’s desecration of sacred sites, American Indians have lodged charges of “cultural appropriation” or the unauthorized use by members of one group of the cultural expressions and resources of another. While these and other incidents make contemporary headlines, American Indians often experience these claims within a historical and continuing experience of dispossession. For hundreds of years, the U.S. legal system has sanctioned the taking and destruction of Indian lands, artifacts, bodies, religions, identities, and beliefs, all toward the project of conquest and ...


Report Of The Special Rapporteur On The Rights Of Indigenous Peoples On The Situation Of Indigenous Peoples In The United States Of America, S. James Anaya Jan 2015

Report Of The Special Rapporteur On The Rights Of Indigenous Peoples On The Situation Of Indigenous Peoples In The United States Of America, S. James Anaya

Articles

No abstract provided.


A Brief History Of The U.S.-American Indian Nations Relationship, Richard B. Collins Jan 2006

A Brief History Of The U.S.-American Indian Nations Relationship, Richard B. Collins

Articles

No abstract provided.


To Feel The Summer In The Spring: The Treaty Fishing Rights Of The Wisconsin Chippewa, Charles F. Wilkinson Jan 1991

To Feel The Summer In The Spring: The Treaty Fishing Rights Of The Wisconsin Chippewa, Charles F. Wilkinson

Articles

In this Article, adapted from his Oliver Rundell Lecture delivered at the University of Wisconsin Law School in April 1990, Professor Charles Wilkinson explores the historical and contemporary conflict arising out of the Chippewa people's assertion of nineteenth century treaty fishing rights. A key to comprehending the Chippewa's position is a realization that they are governments whose sovereign rights predate the United States Constitution and are preserved in federal treaties and statutes. The Chippewa's survival as a people depends upon a recognition of their sovereign prerogatives, an understanding of their history, a respect for their dignity and ...