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Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law Commons

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Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law

The Promise And Peril Of Collective Listening, Whitney Broussard Nov 2016

The Promise And Peril Of Collective Listening, Whitney Broussard

Journal of Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


Digital-Age Claims For Old-World Rights, Joseph M. Beck, Allison M. Scott Nov 2016

Digital-Age Claims For Old-World Rights, Joseph M. Beck, Allison M. Scott

Journal of Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


Exclusive Groove: How Modern Substantial Similarity Law Invites Attenuated Infringement Claims At The Expense Of Innovation And Sustainability In The Music Industry, Mark Kuivila Nov 2016

Exclusive Groove: How Modern Substantial Similarity Law Invites Attenuated Infringement Claims At The Expense Of Innovation And Sustainability In The Music Industry, Mark Kuivila

University of Miami Law Review

As of 2015, the American entertainment market was worth about $600 billion, and it is projected to substantially exceed that figure in coming years. The global entertainment industry is worth about $2 trillion, meaning the U.S. is responsible for over a quarter of total global entertainment revenue. These statistics illustrate the staggering impact of the American entertainment industry on the global markets for film, television, and music. The American music industry is particularly dominant in its global market, earning half of world-wide sync revenues and accounting for nearly a third of all global music revenue. Entertainment is clearly the ...


Fair Use And The New Transformative, Brian Sites Jan 2016

Fair Use And The New Transformative, Brian Sites

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


"Courts Have Twisted Themselves Into Knots": Us Copyright Protection For Applied Art, Jane C. Ginsburg Jan 2016

"Courts Have Twisted Themselves Into Knots": Us Copyright Protection For Applied Art, Jane C. Ginsburg

Faculty Scholarship

In copyright law, the marriage of beauty and utility often proves fraught. Domestic and international law makers have struggled to determine whether, and to what extent, copyright should cover works that are both artistic and functional. The U.S. Copyright Act protects a work of applied art "only if, and only to the extent that, its design incorporates pictorial, graphic, or sculptural features that can be identified separately from, and are capable of existing independently of, the utilitarian aspects of the article." While the policy goal to separate the aesthetic from the functional is clear, courts' application of the statutory ...