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Articles 1 - 11 of 11

Full-Text Articles in Law

Hegel’S Theory Of Quantity, David Gray Carlson Jan 2002

Hegel’S Theory Of Quantity, David Gray Carlson

Articles

Prior to Hegel's time, no philosopher had ever tried to state what "quantity" or "number" was. Hegel undertakes a monumental definition in some of his longest chapters in the Science of Logic. In this paper, the author describes the nature of Hegel's project and how Hegel derives "quantity" from the more primitive concept of "quality." The author also reviews Hegel's critique of calculus, which hereto has received very little attention in English. Finally the author shows how, according to Hegel, the concept of "measure" derives from the unity of quality and quantity. This is the second in ...


How The Electoral College Imitates The World Series, Michael Herz Jan 2002

How The Electoral College Imitates The World Series, Michael Herz

Articles

No abstract provided.


Lord Elgin And The Ottomans: The Question Of Permission, David Rudenstine Jan 2002

Lord Elgin And The Ottomans: The Question Of Permission, David Rudenstine

Articles

No abstract provided.


The Once And Future Property Tax: A Dialogue With My Younger Self, Edward A. Zelinsky Jan 2002

The Once And Future Property Tax: A Dialogue With My Younger Self, Edward A. Zelinsky

Articles

As I look back on my youth (expansively defined as the first 40 years of my life), everywhere I went, the local real property tax was perceived as both bad and doomed. If I could speak with the brash young law student/graduate student/alderman I once was, he would undoubtedly tell me, with great confidence, that by the beginning of the next century (which then seemed very far away) the property tax would no longer play a role in the system of local public finance.

Alas, he was wrong.

This essay explains why the young man I once was ...


Intergroup Rivalry, Anti-Competetive Conduct And Affirmative Action, Michelle Adams Jan 2002

Intergroup Rivalry, Anti-Competetive Conduct And Affirmative Action, Michelle Adams

Articles

Significant research in social science describes racial inequality as grounded in notions of group identity and group conflict. Sociologists and social psychologists who study discrimination and prejudice have moved away from theories that explain prejudice solely as a problem of individual perception, and toward theories that view individual cognitive processes as related to group membership. While present social science yields no consensus view, there is a striking emphasis in the current literature on group identity theories as "powerful determinants of behavior." These theories, which stress the importance of prejudice as a group-based phenomenon and focus on "social-structural theories of group ...


The Supreme Court In Real Time: Haste, Waste, And Bush V. Gore, Michael Herz Jan 2002

The Supreme Court In Real Time: Haste, Waste, And Bush V. Gore, Michael Herz

Articles

No abstract provided.


Rulemaking, Michael Herz Jan 2002

Rulemaking, Michael Herz

Articles

No abstract provided.


The Application Of The Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act To Anaction Against The French Railroad For Transporting Thousandsof Jews And Others To Their Deaths: Abrams V. Sncf, Malvina Halberstam Jan 2002

The Application Of The Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act To Anaction Against The French Railroad For Transporting Thousandsof Jews And Others To Their Deaths: Abrams V. Sncf, Malvina Halberstam

Articles

No abstract provided.


Solving The Apprendi Puzzle, Kyron Huigens Jan 2002

Solving The Apprendi Puzzle, Kyron Huigens

Articles

No abstract provided.


Toward The Formation Of "Innocence Commissions" In America, Barry C. Scheck, Peter J. Neufeld Jan 2002

Toward The Formation Of "Innocence Commissions" In America, Barry C. Scheck, Peter J. Neufeld

Articles

No abstract provided.


Economic Rationality, Empathy, And Corporate Responsibility, Jeanne L. Schroeder Jan 2002

Economic Rationality, Empathy, And Corporate Responsibility, Jeanne L. Schroeder

Articles

Judge Richard A. Posner - the doyen of the law and economics movement - is probably the leading proponent of the hypothesis that legal subjects act as if they were economically rational. Over the years, however, Posner's conception of rationality has devolved from end-means reasoning by a conscious individual human actor, to unconscious instinct which is, nevertheless, beneficial to an individual subject (animal or human) to the mechanistic reproductive activity of individual genes which may or may not be beneficial to either the organism of which the gene is a part - or even to the gene itself. Indeed, all that seems ...