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Full-Text Articles in Mechanical Engineering

Acquisition Of Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope For Biological And Materials Research, Stephen M. Shaler, Seth Shaler, Susan Brawley, Carol H. Kim, Paul J. Millard Nov 2002

Acquisition Of Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope For Biological And Materials Research, Stephen M. Shaler, Seth Shaler, Susan Brawley, Carol H. Kim, Paul J. Millard

University of Maine Office of Research Administration: Grant Reports

Biological and Materials research at the University of Maine will be strongly impacted by the acquisition of a Laser Scanning Electron Microscope as a result of this NSF-MRI award. The Leica confocal unit, along with an upright and inverted microscope and digital camera will form a multi-user facility for campus researchers working with a range of biological and materials problems. Initially, 13 faculty members from 8 academic departments have projects planned for the instrument. The microscope will be the first of its kind on the University of Maine campus.

A wide range of research problems will be attacked through use ...


Comment On "Quadriceps Protects The Anterior Cruciate Ligament", Antonie J. Van Den Bogert Sep 2002

Comment On "Quadriceps Protects The Anterior Cruciate Ligament", Antonie J. Van Den Bogert

Mechanical Engineering Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Response Time Is More Important Than Walking Speed For The Ability Of Older Adults To Avoid A Fall After A Trip, Antonie J. Van Den Bogert, M. J. Pavol, M. D. Grabiner Feb 2002

Response Time Is More Important Than Walking Speed For The Ability Of Older Adults To Avoid A Fall After A Trip, Antonie J. Van Den Bogert, M. J. Pavol, M. D. Grabiner

Mechanical Engineering Faculty Publications

We previously reported that the probability of an older adult recovering from a forward trip and using a “lowering” strategy increases with decreased walking velocity and faster response time. To determine the within-subject interaction of these variables we asked three questions: (1) Is the body orientation at the time that the recovery foot is lowered to the ground (“tilt angle”) critical for successful recovery? (2) Can a simple inverted pendulum model, using subject-specific walking velocity and response time as input variables, predict this body orientation, and thus success of recovery? (3) Is slower walking velocity or faster response time more ...


Heat Transfer (Y. Cengel), Alireza Zolfaghari Jan 2002

Heat Transfer (Y. Cengel), Alireza Zolfaghari

Dr Alireza Zolfaghari

No abstract provided.