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Full-Text Articles in Biomedical Engineering and Bioengineering

Microtissue Size And Cell-Cell Communication Modulate Cell Migration In Arrayed 3d Collagen Gels, Jacob A. M. Nuhn, Shenmin Gong, Xiangchen Che, Long Que, Ian C. Schneider Sep 2018

Microtissue Size And Cell-Cell Communication Modulate Cell Migration In Arrayed 3d Collagen Gels, Jacob A. M. Nuhn, Shenmin Gong, Xiangchen Che, Long Que, Ian C. Schneider

Chemical and Biological Engineering Publications

Cells communicate through the extracellular matrix (ECM) in many physiological and pathological processes. This is particularly important during cell migration, where cell communication can alter both the speed and the direction of migration. However, most cell culture systems operate with large volumes relative to cell numbers, creating low cell densities and diluting factors that mediate cell communication. Furthermore, they lack the ability to isolate single cells or small groups of cells. Droplet forming devices allow for an ability to embed single or small groups of cells into small volume segregated 3D environments, increasing the cell density to physiological levels. In ...


High Throughput Studies Of Cell Migration In 3d Microtissues Fabricated By A Droplet Microfluidic Chip, Xiangchen Che, Jacob A. M. Nuhn, Ian C. Schneider, Long Que Jan 2016

High Throughput Studies Of Cell Migration In 3d Microtissues Fabricated By A Droplet Microfluidic Chip, Xiangchen Che, Jacob A. M. Nuhn, Ian C. Schneider, Long Que

Chemical and Biological Engineering Publications

Arrayed three-dimensional (3D) micro-sized tissues with encapsulated cells (microtissues) have been fabricated by a droplet microfluidic chip. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a polymerized collagen network. One or multiple breast cancer cells were embedded within the microtissues, which were stored in arrayed microchambers on the same chip without ECM droplet shrinkage over 48 h. The migration trajectory of the cells was recorded by optical microscopy. The migration speed was calculated in the range of 3–6 µm/h. Interestingly, cells in devices filled with a continuous collagen network migrated faster than those where only droplets were arrayed in the chambers ...