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Articles 1 - 15 of 15

Full-Text Articles in Education

Nf05-640 Early Literacy Checklist — Classroom, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-640 Early Literacy Checklist — Classroom, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This checklist represents the kinds of language and literacy development practices often seen in high-quality early childhood environments. The checklist encompasses all children birth to age 5 and is inclusive of the needs of children with disabilities and English language learners.


Nf05-629 Helping Children Resolve Conflict Pitfalls To Avoid During Conflict Mediation, Marjorie Kostelnik, Mary Nelson, Sarah Effken Purcell, Eileen Krumbach, Janet S. Hanna, Debra E. Schroeder, Kathy Bosch, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-629 Helping Children Resolve Conflict Pitfalls To Avoid During Conflict Mediation, Marjorie Kostelnik, Mary Nelson, Sarah Effken Purcell, Eileen Krumbach, Janet S. Hanna, Debra E. Schroeder, Kathy Bosch, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

When using conflict mediation, children learn skills necessary to reach peaceful solutions. These skills include: communication, compromise, the ability to see how different aspects of a dispute are related, and the ability to consider their own perspective as well as that of another person. As children learn problem-solving procedures and words, they become increasingly capable of solving problems by themselves. There is evidence that these childhood learnings are maintained through the adult years.


Nf05-628 Helping Children Resolve Conflict Conflict Mediation Model, Marjorie Kostelnik, Debra E. Schroeder, Sarah Effken Purcell, Mary Nelson, Eileen Krumbach, Janet S. Hanna, Kathy Bosch, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-628 Helping Children Resolve Conflict Conflict Mediation Model, Marjorie Kostelnik, Debra E. Schroeder, Sarah Effken Purcell, Mary Nelson, Eileen Krumbach, Janet S. Hanna, Kathy Bosch, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

During conflict mediation children learn the skills necessary to reach peaceful resolutions. These skills involve communication, compromise, the ability to see how different aspects of a dispute are related and the ability to consider their own perspective as well as that of another person.

Adults play an important role in the socialization of children. They help children develop social skills. This NebFact discusses how to teach children to resolve conflicts.


Nf05-637 The Power Of Family Literacy, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-637 The Power Of Family Literacy, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Virtually all families want their children to learn to read and write, and to succeed in school, and are eager to provide any support necessary.

Family involvement in everyday language- and literacy-related activities has a significant impact on children's language dvevelopment acquisition of early literacy skills. Early language and literacy activities at home contribute to differences when children enter school.


Nf95-641 Car — A Strategy For Learning, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf95-641 Car — A Strategy For Learning, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Language and literacy development starts at the very beginning of a child's life and is one of the main developmental events of early childhood. This process if facilitated by early adult-child interactions in which the adult guides and supports the child's learning by building on what the child already knows. Following the child's lead, a key strategy presented in Language Is the Key is one of the defining aspects of developmentally appropriate practice. It has been shown to successfuly facilitate early language development for children with and without disabilities.


Nf05-639 Early Literacy Checklist — In The Home, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-639 Early Literacy Checklist — In The Home, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This checklist represents the kinds of language and literacy development practices often seen in high-quality early childhood environments. The checklist encompasses all children birth to age 5 and is inclusive of the needs of children with disabilities and English language learners.


Maximising Parent Involvement In The Pedestrian Safety Of 4 To 6 Year Old Children: December 2005, Donna Cross, Margaret Hall, Greg Hamilton Jan 2005

Maximising Parent Involvement In The Pedestrian Safety Of 4 To 6 Year Old Children: December 2005, Donna Cross, Margaret Hall, Greg Hamilton

ECU Publications Pre. 2011

In Australia, pedestrian injury is the leading specific cause of death among five to nine year old children (AI Yaman, Bryant & Sargeant 2002). In 1999-00 in Australia, there were 1,144 hospitalisations of children aged 0-14 years for pedestrian injuries, with a hospitalisation rate of 29.1 per 100,000 children. These rates decreased with age and were lowest for children aged 1 0-14 years. Pedestrian injuries among 0-14 year olds in 1999-00 were the second highest cause of hospitalisation in children (AI Yaman, Bryant & Sargeant 2002). While fatalities from pedestrian injuries among children 0-14 years have declined from 3 ...


Better Beginnings: A Western Australian State Library Initiated Family Literacy Project, Caroline Barratt-Pugh, Mary Rohl, Grace Oakley, Jessica Elderfield Jan 2005

Better Beginnings: A Western Australian State Library Initiated Family Literacy Project, Caroline Barratt-Pugh, Mary Rohl, Grace Oakley, Jessica Elderfield

ECU Publications Pre. 2011

Better Beginnings is an early intervention family literacy program that has been developed by the Public Library Services Directorate, at the State Library of Western Australia. Its stated purpose is to provide positive language and literacy influences for children in their first three years of life. The program is thought to be the first of its kind in Australia and has recently been taken up by another Australian Territory State. A fully evaluated pilot of Better Beginnings commenced in January 2004 in Gosnells, Mandurah, Midland, Carnarvon, Halls Creek and Kalgoorlie and in September was extended to include Armadale, Rockingham, Bayswater ...


Nf05-625 Communicating With Families: Communicating With Families Of Infants, Debra E. Schroeder, Mary K. Warner, Mary Nelson, Eileen Krumbach, Sarah Effken Purcell, Janet S. Hanna, Kathy Bosch, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-625 Communicating With Families: Communicating With Families Of Infants, Debra E. Schroeder, Mary K. Warner, Mary Nelson, Eileen Krumbach, Sarah Effken Purcell, Janet S. Hanna, Kathy Bosch, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Families have many adjustments to make as they transition to parenthood. Parenting is a lonely endeavor sometimes. Often families rely more on outside child care, and with that comes the need, particularly for families of infants, to keep the communication lines open between themselves and their child-care providers. A variety of techniques can be used to help families and child-care providers communicate effectively.


Nf05-627 Communicating With Families: Communication Techniques, Debra E. Schroeder, Mary K. Warner, Mary Nelson, Eileen Krumbach, Sarah Effken Purcell, Janet S. Hanna, Kathy Bosch, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-627 Communicating With Families: Communication Techniques, Debra E. Schroeder, Mary K. Warner, Mary Nelson, Eileen Krumbach, Sarah Effken Purcell, Janet S. Hanna, Kathy Bosch, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

In the best child-care settings, providers and families work as a team. Each brings a unique point of view, and each shows concern for the child's growth and development. As a child-care professional, one of your roles in this partnership is to promote effective communication with families. It is important for child-care providers to develop and practice effective communication skills and implement them when communicating with families about their children.


Nf05-626 Communicating With Families: Building Relationships, Mary K. Warner, Debra E. Schroeder, Mary Nelson, Eileen Krumbach, Sarah Effken Purcell, Kathy Bosch, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-626 Communicating With Families: Building Relationships, Mary K. Warner, Debra E. Schroeder, Mary Nelson, Eileen Krumbach, Sarah Effken Purcell, Kathy Bosch, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Successful child-care providers, preschool teachers and elementary teachers begin to establish positive relationships with the children in their care or classrooms as soon as possible. Here are some guidelines for making closer contact with the children's families.


Nf05-644 Relationships: The Heart Of Language And Literacy, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-644 Relationships: The Heart Of Language And Literacy, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Infants and toddlers learn early language and literacy skills in the context of their relationships with the adults around them as if they are putting together a puzzle. Most of the puzzle pieces involve taking turns with the baby — your turn, my turn, your turn, my turn. The turns might be with actions or with talking. The turns might be very quick or rather slow.

This NebFact discusses turn-taking; what it involves and the strategies used.


Nf05-642 Symbols Of Literacy Development, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain Jan 2005

Nf05-642 Symbols Of Literacy Development, Janet S. Hanna, Kayla M. Hinrichs, Carla J. Mahar, John Defrain

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Early environments matter and nurturing relationships are essential for literacy development of young children. Infants and toddlers who have secure relationships with their caregivers are more involved in literacy activities.

This NebFacts covers the interaction with symbols, physical and social features of symbols, and the use of words, symbols and print.


Nf05-651 Learning From Children About Severe Weather, Leanne Manning, John Defrain, Dianne Swanson Jan 2005

Nf05-651 Learning From Children About Severe Weather, Leanne Manning, John Defrain, Dianne Swanson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

On May 22, 2004, at 8:08 p.m. the National Weather Service in Omaha issued a tornado warning for Gage County in southeast Nebraska until 9:15 p.m. At 8:03 p.m. a tornado was on the ground six miles south of Wilber moving northeast at 25 mph. At 8:16 p.m. law enforcement officials reported a tornado on the ground near Wilber moving northeast at 15 mph. These warnings were heard by those listening to television or radio and struck fear in the hearts of many on that night.

In the days and weeks that ...


From The Beginning: What Educators And Parents Of Children With Special Needs Do To Resolve Differences, Jeannette E. Newman Jan 2005

From The Beginning: What Educators And Parents Of Children With Special Needs Do To Resolve Differences, Jeannette E. Newman

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

How educators and parents of children with special needs resolve differences at the early stages of a dispute is vital to our understanding of how to avoid an escalation of conflict and irreparable damage to this important relationship. This study examines why some disputes between educators and parents resolved and others are not. Following the cases of nine children whose parents had a difference with the child's educators, I focused specifically on what parents and educators do to try to resolve their differences. I interviewed parents and educators involved in disputes, observed meetings that centered on the differences the ...