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Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1981

Plants

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Education

G81-552 Effects Of Weather On Corn Planting And Seedling Establishment, Ralph E. Neild Jan 1981

G81-552 Effects Of Weather On Corn Planting And Seedling Establishment, Ralph E. Neild

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Corn planting usually begins when the average daily temperature first rises 55°F and the soil becomes sufficiently warm enough to initiate germination and sustain seedling growth. This may be as early as the middle of March in central Texas 700 miles south of Nebraska or as late as the middle of May in central South Dakota. Corn may be planted as early as the first week of April in southeast Nebraska and continue into the first week of June. Most of the corn, however, is planted between May 4 and May 21.

Corn planted early when the temperature is ...


Ec81-1870 Guide To The Identification Of Diseases Of Shrubs, John E. Watkins Jan 1981

Ec81-1870 Guide To The Identification Of Diseases Of Shrubs, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This 4-color extension circular identifies the following diseases of shrubs in the home garden and landscape disease series: rose mosaics (rose mosaic virus and rose yellow mosaic virus), rose rust, fire blight, powdery mildew, crown gall, scab, iron chlorosis, honesuckle leaf blight, and phomopsis twig blight.


Ec81-1869 Guide To The Identification Of Physiological Disorders Of Landscape Plants, John E. Watkins, Donald H. Steinegger Jan 1981

Ec81-1869 Guide To The Identification Of Physiological Disorders Of Landscape Plants, John E. Watkins, Donald H. Steinegger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Physiological disorders are plant diseases caused by non-living agents. Other terms for this group of disorders are abiotic diseases or noninfectious diseases.

Physiological disorders are often confused with pathogen-caused diseases but they do not spread from plant to plant as do diseases caused by living organisms. Landscape plants are often exposed to toxic materials, mechanical damage, nutritional stress, homeowner neglect and other stress factors in the urban environment.

This 4-color extension publication highlights the following physiological disorders of landscape plants: sun scald, drought, lightning injury, winter injury, root girdling, iron chlorosis, salt injury, herbicide injury and air pollution.


Ec81-1240 Vegetable Gardening In Nebraska, Dale T. Lindgren, Laurie Hodges, Don Steinegger, Ralph E. Neild Jan 1981

Ec81-1240 Vegetable Gardening In Nebraska, Dale T. Lindgren, Laurie Hodges, Don Steinegger, Ralph E. Neild

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Nebraskans are increasing their consumption of fresh vegetables — as appetizers, salads, side dishes, and snacks. Fresh vegetables are an integral part of a healthy, well-balanced diet. Although Nebraska's climate and soil are well-suited for many vegetables, most are supplied from out of the state, even during summer. Growing fresh vegetables can provide higher nutrition and flavor at less expense than buying fresh produce at the grocery store. A garden also can be a source of personal enjoyment and satisfaction.

This extension circular helps the gardener decide when, where, and how to plant and maintain a vegetable garden.