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Series

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

1973

Gardening

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Education

G73-73 Sweet Potatoes (Revised June 1992), R.E. Neild, Laurie Hodges Jan 1973

G73-73 Sweet Potatoes (Revised June 1992), R.E. Neild, Laurie Hodges

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Varieties, requirements and culture, harvesting and storage of sweet potatoes.

The sweet potato, a member of the morning glory plant family, is native to tropical America. It is an important food plant in warmer regions of the world and is adapted to southeastern Nebraska. Sweet potatoes may be boiled, baked, fried, or candied. They have high food value. Varieties with deeply yellow colored roots are a good source of vitamin A.


G73-71 Lettuce (Revised April 1990), R.E. Neild, Roger D. Uhlinger Jan 1973

G73-71 Lettuce (Revised April 1990), R.E. Neild, Roger D. Uhlinger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Successfully growing and harvesting lettuce is the focus of this NebGuide.

Lettuce is an increasingly popular vegetable in the United States. Because it is a basic ingredient in salads, lettuce is eaten more frequently than any other vegetable. Lettuce can be served alone with a variety of dressings or mixed with other fresh vegetables.

Its fresh color and crisp texture serve well as a garnish, and its leaves may be stuffed with fruit, cheese, seafood, poultry, ham, or egg salads. Although usually consumed fresh, leaf lettuce and chopped green onions "wilted" with warm vegetable oil and vinegar make a pleasing ...


G73-12 Iris Borer Control, David L. Keith, Frederick P. Baxendale Jan 1973

G73-12 Iris Borer Control, David L. Keith, Frederick P. Baxendale

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Scouting, prevention and control of the iris borer.

This insect is the most serious insect pest of iris in Nebraska and is found virtually everywhere in the state. Damage is characterized by dark, streaked, or watery areas and ragged edges on the developing leaves of iris in May and June and extensive destruction of the insides of the rhizomes in July and early August. Examination late in summer will reveal a large white to pinkish caterpillar from 1 1/2 to 2 inches long in the rhizome, usually accompanied by a foul-smelling soft rot.