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G73-65 Locating A New Feedlot, E. A. Olson Jan 1973

G73-65 Locating A New Feedlot, E. A. Olson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The selection of a site for a livestock feedlot directly affects the success of the feedlot.

The selection of a site for a livestock feedlot directly affects the success of the feedlot.

Factors to consider in choosing a feedlot location include: environmental considerations, streams, topography, water supply, land area, towns and zoning laws. Other items include a source of livestock and feed, transportation (roads), marketing facilities. Finally the operator must determine the size to build with provision for expansion.


G73-46 Hessian Fly On Wheat, John E. Foster, Gary L. Hein Jan 1973

G73-46 Hessian Fly On Wheat, John E. Foster, Gary L. Hein

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the life cycle, control and prevention of the Hessian fly. Plant-safe dates and resistant wheat varieties are also examined.

The Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say), is not native to the United States, but was probably introduced by Hessian soldiers during the Revolutionary War. This insect was given its common name by Americans because of its damage on Long Island in 1779. The pest has become distributed throughout the United States wheat production areas since then.

The Hessian fly belongs to the family of insects known as gall midges (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), a group noted for their habit of ...


G73-24 Winter Wheat Varieties, Lenis Alton Nelson, R.H. Hammons, P. Stephen Baenziger Jan 1973

G73-24 Winter Wheat Varieties, Lenis Alton Nelson, R.H. Hammons, P. Stephen Baenziger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide provides brief descriptions of selected winter wheat varieties released since 1984. The University of Nebraska Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources conducts wheat variety trials in all parts of Nebraska. Private companies enter their varieties or hybrids in the test voluntarily. Public entries are chosen by the agronomy staff at the University. The current copy of the annual Extension Circular, Nebraska Fall-Sown Small Grain Variety Tests, includes detailed yield, bushel weight, other performance data, and period of years data. Nebraska Cooperative Extension and the University's Agricultural Research Division jointly publish these circulars which are available from Extension ...


G73-35 How To Plant Wheat, C. R. Fenster, G. A. Peterson Jan 1973

G73-35 How To Plant Wheat, C. R. Fenster, G. A. Peterson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Winter wheat needs a seedbed that is firm enough to provide good seed-soil contact and is moist enough to provide water for germination and seedling establishment. Winter wheat needs a seedbed that is firm enough to provide good seed-soil contact and is moist enough to provide water for germination and seedling establishment. Other Nebraska Experiment Station information is available on how to properly prepare the seedbed.


G73-60 Working With Wood I. Home Drying Lumber (Revised July 1987), Michael Kuhns, Richard Straight Jan 1973

G73-60 Working With Wood I. Home Drying Lumber (Revised July 1987), Michael Kuhns, Richard Straight

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Avoid the expense of kiln-dried lumber by processing and drying your own lumber at home.

Anyone who has done much woodworking knows how expensive high quality, kiln-dried, hardwood lumber can be. Even kiln-dried construction lumber is expensive. Besides expense, there also may be problems with finding certain species of wood, highly figured wood, or hardwood boards thicker than one inch (4/4).

One way to avoid these problems is to dry your own lumber. Green, unsurfaced, or unplaned lumber can be obtained from many small sawmills in Nebraska and surrounding states. You may also want to obtain your own logs ...


G73-45 Managing Black Walnut Plantations For Timber (Revised March 1979), Neal E. Jennings, Frank A. Hershey Jan 1973

G73-45 Managing Black Walnut Plantations For Timber (Revised March 1979), Neal E. Jennings, Frank A. Hershey

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

A basic knowledge of tree needs and the application of simple management principles are required to produce quality black walnut timber.

Black walnut (Juglans nigra) is a high value timber species. The only way to maximize profit from black walnut plantations is by good timber management. Management practices that increase growth, improve quality and reduce damage, substantially increase profit. A basic knowledge of tree needs and the application of simple management principles are required to produce quality black walnut timber.

Protection, pruning and thinning are the major management activities.


G73-73 Sweet Potatoes (Revised June 1992), R.E. Neild, Laurie Hodges Jan 1973

G73-73 Sweet Potatoes (Revised June 1992), R.E. Neild, Laurie Hodges

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Varieties, requirements and culture, harvesting and storage of sweet potatoes.

The sweet potato, a member of the morning glory plant family, is native to tropical America. It is an important food plant in warmer regions of the world and is adapted to southeastern Nebraska. Sweet potatoes may be boiled, baked, fried, or candied. They have high food value. Varieties with deeply yellow colored roots are a good source of vitamin A.


G73-71 Lettuce (Revised April 1990), R.E. Neild, Roger D. Uhlinger Jan 1973

G73-71 Lettuce (Revised April 1990), R.E. Neild, Roger D. Uhlinger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Successfully growing and harvesting lettuce is the focus of this NebGuide.

Lettuce is an increasingly popular vegetable in the United States. Because it is a basic ingredient in salads, lettuce is eaten more frequently than any other vegetable. Lettuce can be served alone with a variety of dressings or mixed with other fresh vegetables.

Its fresh color and crisp texture serve well as a garnish, and its leaves may be stuffed with fruit, cheese, seafood, poultry, ham, or egg salads. Although usually consumed fresh, leaf lettuce and chopped green onions "wilted" with warm vegetable oil and vinegar make a pleasing ...


G73-4 Bagworms (Revised June 1987), Frederick P. Baxendale Jan 1973

G73-4 Bagworms (Revised June 1987), Frederick P. Baxendale

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Bagworms can damage juniper, arborvitae, pine, and spruce. Description, life history, and control are discussed in this publication.

The bagworm is native to the United States and is found in eastern Nebraska. Bagworms feed on many species of trees and shrubs, but are most common on junipers. They are rarely a serious problem on deciduous trees, except when larvae move away from evergreens.


G73-12 Iris Borer Control, David L. Keith, Frederick P. Baxendale Jan 1973

G73-12 Iris Borer Control, David L. Keith, Frederick P. Baxendale

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Scouting, prevention and control of the iris borer.

This insect is the most serious insect pest of iris in Nebraska and is found virtually everywhere in the state. Damage is characterized by dark, streaked, or watery areas and ragged edges on the developing leaves of iris in May and June and extensive destruction of the insides of the rhizomes in July and early August. Examination late in summer will reveal a large white to pinkish caterpillar from 1 1/2 to 2 inches long in the rhizome, usually accompanied by a foul-smelling soft rot.


G73-14 Grain Processing For Feedlot Cattle, Paul Q. Guyer Jan 1973

G73-14 Grain Processing For Feedlot Cattle, Paul Q. Guyer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Several changes have occurred in the cattle feeding business which have focused attention on grain processing. The first of these was, the arrival of big feedlots provided an opportunity to use larger and more sophisticated processing equipment at reasonable cost per ton of feed produced. Also, the need to minimize feed separation and digestive disturbances encouraged the use of more sophisticated methods of processing.

A second development that is now focusing attention on grain processing is the rapidly increasing costs of equipment, fuel and labor involved in grain processing. In recent years, these have been increasing more rapidly than the ...


G73-66 Mound Design For Feedlots, Paul Q. Guyer Jan 1973

G73-66 Mound Design For Feedlots, Paul Q. Guyer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Shaping each feedlot pen to minimize mud problems is an important part of feedlot design.

Mud is our most costly weather hazard. Shaping each feedlot pen to minimize mud problems is an important part of feedlot design. While mud cannot be eliminated, proper shaping can reduce the number of days when it is a profit robber. And, proper shaping will also reduce the number of fly breeding areas within the pen, adding to summer comfort and gains. The cost is minimal at most locations if shaping is done before installing fencing, bunks, waterers and aprons.


G73-27 Hedging Vs. Cash Contracts, Lynn H. Lutgen Jan 1973

G73-27 Hedging Vs. Cash Contracts, Lynn H. Lutgen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide examines the advantages and disadvantages of hedging versus cash contracts.

There is substantial risk in agricultural production and marketing. Weather, insects, disease, world conditions and other circumstances can affect production and costs.

The actual market price which will exist when the commodity being produced is ready for sale is also unknown. Good management can at least partially compensate for the uncertainty associated with these and other unknowns.

The objective is to discuss two alternatives available to producers for reducing the market gamble or market risk. The alternatives are (1) hedging on the futures market and, (2) selling on ...


Ec73-219 1973 Nebraska Swine Report, E.R. Peo, P.J. Cunningham, James Drake Heldt, Leo E. Lucas, Bobby D. Moser, Keith E. Gilster, Murray Danielson, William Ahlschwede, R. D. Fritschen, Alex Hogg, Larry Bitney, R. Gene White, Lanny K. Icenogle Jan 1973

Ec73-219 1973 Nebraska Swine Report, E.R. Peo, P.J. Cunningham, James Drake Heldt, Leo E. Lucas, Bobby D. Moser, Keith E. Gilster, Murray Danielson, William Ahlschwede, R. D. Fritschen, Alex Hogg, Larry Bitney, R. Gene White, Lanny K. Icenogle

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This 1973 Nebraska Swine Report was prepared by the staff in Animal Science and cooperating departments for use in the Extension and Teaching programs at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Authors from the following areas contributed to this publication: Swine Nutrition, swine diseases, pathology, economics, engineering, swine breeding, meats, agronomy, and diagnostic laboratory. It covers the following areas: breeding, disease control, feeding, nutrition, economics, housing and meats.


G73-20 Fertilizing Through Center Pivots, Paul E. Flschbach Jan 1973

G73-20 Fertilizing Through Center Pivots, Paul E. Flschbach

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

There are two decisions and three sources of information that are needed before applying fertilizer solutions through a center-pivot sprinkler system. These are discussed in this publication.

The decisions are: the amount of nitrogen to be applied per acre through center-pivot sprinkler system; and the kind of fertilizer solution to be applied.

The information needed is: the number of acres that will be irrigated in one revolution of the center-pivot sprinkler system; the amount of time required to make one revolution of the center-pivot sprinkler system; and the rate at which your porportioning pump can inject a fertilizer solution into ...


G73-15 Handling Feed Moisture In Ration Formulation And Inventory Control (Revised December 1983), Paul Q. Guyer Jan 1973

G73-15 Handling Feed Moisture In Ration Formulation And Inventory Control (Revised December 1983), Paul Q. Guyer

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Nutritional quality control begins with knowing and adjusting for variation in the moisture content of feed ingredients. Moisture variations in feeds are almost always of more importance than variations in protein, mineral, and energy. Inventory control is affected by moisture content of feeds. Some feeds on hand are constantly changing in moisture content, and these changes frequently lead to financial losses when a price adjustment is not made for moisture losses.


G73-12 Iris Borer Control (Revised June 1994), David L. Keith, Frederick P. Baxendale Jan 1973

G73-12 Iris Borer Control (Revised June 1994), David L. Keith, Frederick P. Baxendale

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the scouting, prevention and control of the iris borer. This insect is the most serious insect pest of iris in Nebraska and is found virtually everywhere in the state. Damage is characterized by dark, streaked, or watery areas and ragged edges on the developing leaves of iris in May and June and extensive destruction of the insides of the rhizomes in July and early August.


G73-42 Slaughter Cattle Sale Choices (Revised June 1976), Allen C. Wellman Jan 1973

G73-42 Slaughter Cattle Sale Choices (Revised June 1976), Allen C. Wellman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Cattle sold for slaughter can be sold either on a live or carcass weight basis. The ability to compare bid price for these two alternatives is necessary if the producer is to receive the maximum return from the cattle being sold. This publication discusses these choices for the livestock producer to use.


G73-31 Design And Construction Of Grain Bin Floors (Revised May 1979), Gerald R. Bodman, Thomas L. Thompson Jan 1973

G73-31 Design And Construction Of Grain Bin Floors (Revised May 1979), Gerald R. Bodman, Thomas L. Thompson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The foundation and floor for a new or used grain bin performs several functions. In addition to supporting the grain and the bin, it protects the grain from moisture and rodents, prevents settlement of the bin, and anchors the bin. Good design and careful construction are necessary to assure that the bin will perform in a satisfactory manner. For efficient operation, a bin floor must be capable of serving as an integrated part of the total grain handling system.


G73-30 The Alfalfa Weevil (Revised May 1989), Stephen D. Danielson, David L. Keith, George Manglitz Jan 1973

G73-30 The Alfalfa Weevil (Revised May 1989), Stephen D. Danielson, David L. Keith, George Manglitz

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The alfalfa weevil is the primary insect pest of alfalfa in Nebraska. Management is essential during years when weevil infestations are high.

Damage from the alfalfa weevil can be severe. The life cycle of this pest and methods of managing it are discussed in this publication.


G73-62 Webworm Control In Sugarbeets (Revised March 1979), Arthur F. Hagen Jan 1973

G73-62 Webworm Control In Sugarbeets (Revised March 1979), Arthur F. Hagen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The sugarbeet webworm and the alfalfa webworm attack sugarbeets. Frequent outbreaks have been reported in sugarbeets from both species, so they are now generally listed only as "webworms." Their life history, damage and control are similar and are discussed in this publication.


G73-61 Pale Striped Flea Beetle In Sugarbeets And Beans (Revised March 1979), Arthur F. Hagen Jan 1973

G73-61 Pale Striped Flea Beetle In Sugarbeets And Beans (Revised March 1979), Arthur F. Hagen

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Only small areas of western Nebraska appear to be troubled by this insect at present, but it appears to be infesting larger areas of sugarbeets each year.

This publication discusses the life history, damage and control of the pale striped flea beetle in sugarbeets and beans.


G73-58 Programmed Soil Moisture Depletion: Top Yields With Least Water (Revised), Paul E. Fischbach, Burt R. Sommerhalder Jan 1973

G73-58 Programmed Soil Moisture Depletion: Top Yields With Least Water (Revised), Paul E. Fischbach, Burt R. Sommerhalder

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The development of automated irrigation has introduced a revised concept to irrigation water management that will mean savings of water and energy. By not completely refilling the root zone each irrigation, soil moisture storage capacity is left within the root zone to take advantage of any rainfall that occurs after an irrigation. Conservation of water is important because supplies are being depleted in many areas.


G73-57 Hot Weather Livestock Stress, Allen C. Wellman Jan 1973

G73-57 Hot Weather Livestock Stress, Allen C. Wellman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

During periods of high temperatures and humidity, livestock losses can occur from "Hot Weather Stress." How weather stress is particularly hazardous to closely confined livestock (those in feedlots, sorting and holding pens, trucks and rail cars). High relative humidity when the temperature is at 80 degrees or higher adds to the likelihood of profit-stealing losses if necessary precautions are not taken.

Nebraska livestock producers can make their livestock handling and marketing plans flexible enough or take necessary precautions to reduce or eliminate livestock hot weather stress by following this Livestock Weather Hazard Guide.


G73-2 Fertilizer Management For Alfalfa (Revised August 1977), Delno Knudsen, George Rehm Jan 1973

G73-2 Fertilizer Management For Alfalfa (Revised August 1977), Delno Knudsen, George Rehm

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Adequate soil fertility is necessary for alfalfa production on both dryland and irrigated soils of Nebraska. With adequate, but not excessive fertilizer programs, irrigated alfalfa should produce 6 to 8 tons per acre. Dryland alfalfa on the same soils should, on the average, produce 2 to 3 tons per acre.

This NebGuide covers the following areas for fertilizer management for alfalfa: soil and water tests, lime, fertilizer for establishment, phosphorus, potassium, sulfur, micronutrients, nitrogen recommendations and special problems.