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Full-Text Articles in Education

The Ethical, Legal And Social Implications Of Using Artificial Intelligence Systems In Breast Cancer Care, Stacy M. Carter, Wendy Rogers, Khin Than Win, Helen Frazer, Bernadette Richards, Nehmat Houssami Jan 2020

The Ethical, Legal And Social Implications Of Using Artificial Intelligence Systems In Breast Cancer Care, Stacy M. Carter, Wendy Rogers, Khin Than Win, Helen Frazer, Bernadette Richards, Nehmat Houssami

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Breast cancer care is a leading area for development of artificial intelligence (AI), with applications including screening and diagnosis, risk calculation, prognostication and clinical decision-support, management planning, and precision medicine. We review the ethical, legal and social implications of these developments. We consider the values encoded in algorithms, the need to evaluate outcomes, and issues of bias and transferability, data ownership, confidentiality and consent, and legal, moral and professional responsibility. We consider potential effects for patients, including on trust in healthcare, and provide some social science explanations for the apparent rush to implement AI solutions. We conclude by anticipating future ...


Teachers' Multicultural Attitudes And Perceptions Of School Policy And School Climate In Relation To Burnout, Anneke Dubbeld, Natascha De Hoog, Perry Den Brok, Maarten F. De Laat Jan 2019

Teachers' Multicultural Attitudes And Perceptions Of School Policy And School Climate In Relation To Burnout, Anneke Dubbeld, Natascha De Hoog, Perry Den Brok, Maarten F. De Laat

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

There is a growing number of ethnically and culturally diverse students in Dutch junior vocational high schools. This article examines teachers' multicultural attitudes, their perceptions of cultural diversity related to school policy and school climate, and the chance of general and diversity-related burnout. The present research also characterises teachers in terms of their multicultural attitudes and perceptions of school policy and climate through cluster analysis. Results are based on questionnaire data of 120 teachers, working at five locations of a multicultural junior vocational high school in a highly urbanised part of the Netherlands. Correlational, regression, and variance analyses indicated that ...


Increased Beta Activity Links To Impaired Emotional Control In Adhd Adults With High Iq, Hui Li, Qihua Zhao, Fang Huang, Qingjiu Cao, Stuart J. Johnstone, Yufeng Wang, Changming Wang, Li Sun Jan 2019

Increased Beta Activity Links To Impaired Emotional Control In Adhd Adults With High Iq, Hui Li, Qihua Zhao, Fang Huang, Qingjiu Cao, Stuart J. Johnstone, Yufeng Wang, Changming Wang, Li Sun

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Objective: The present study investigated the neuropathology of everyday-life executive function (EF) deficits in adults with ADHD with high IQ. Method: Forty adults with ADHD with an IQ ≥ 120 and 40 controls were recruited. Ecological EFs were measured, and eyes-closed Electroencephalograph (EEG) signals were recorded during a resting-state condition; EEG power and correlations with impaired EFs were analyzed. Results: Compared with controls, the ADHD group showed higher scores on all clusters of EF. The ADHD group showed globally increased theta, globally decreased alpha, and increased central beta activity. In the ADHD group, central beta power was significantly related to emotional ...


Global Benchmarking Of Children's Exposure To Television Advertising Of Unhealthy Foods And Beverages Across 22 Countries, Bridget Kelly, Stefanie Vandevijvere, See Hoe Ng, Jean Adams, Lorena Allemandi, Liliana Bahena-Espina, Simon Barquera, Emma J. Boyland, Paul Calleja, Isabel Cristina Carmona-Garces, Luciana Castronuovo, Daniel Cauchi, Teresa Correa, Camila Corvalan, Emma Cosenza-Quintana, Carlos Fernandez-Escobar, Laura Gonzalez-Zapata, Jason C. Halford, Nongnuch Jaichuen, Melissa Jensen, Tilakavati Karupaiah, Asha Kaur, Maria Kroker-Lobos, Zandile Mchiza, Krista Miklavec, Whadi-Ah Parker, Monique Potvin Kent, Igor Pravst, Manuel Ramirez-Zea, Sascha Reiff, Marcela Reyes, Miguel Royo-Bordonada, Putthipanya Rueangsom, Peter Scarborough, Maria Tiscornia, Lizbeth Tolentino-Mayo, Jillian Wate, Martin White, Irina Zamora-Corrales, Lingxia Zeng, Boyd A. Swinburn Jan 2019

Global Benchmarking Of Children's Exposure To Television Advertising Of Unhealthy Foods And Beverages Across 22 Countries, Bridget Kelly, Stefanie Vandevijvere, See Hoe Ng, Jean Adams, Lorena Allemandi, Liliana Bahena-Espina, Simon Barquera, Emma J. Boyland, Paul Calleja, Isabel Cristina Carmona-Garces, Luciana Castronuovo, Daniel Cauchi, Teresa Correa, Camila Corvalan, Emma Cosenza-Quintana, Carlos Fernandez-Escobar, Laura Gonzalez-Zapata, Jason C. Halford, Nongnuch Jaichuen, Melissa Jensen, Tilakavati Karupaiah, Asha Kaur, Maria Kroker-Lobos, Zandile Mchiza, Krista Miklavec, Whadi-Ah Parker, Monique Potvin Kent, Igor Pravst, Manuel Ramirez-Zea, Sascha Reiff, Marcela Reyes, Miguel Royo-Bordonada, Putthipanya Rueangsom, Peter Scarborough, Maria Tiscornia, Lizbeth Tolentino-Mayo, Jillian Wate, Martin White, Irina Zamora-Corrales, Lingxia Zeng, Boyd A. Swinburn

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Restricting children's exposures to marketing of unhealthy foods and beverages is a global obesity prevention priority. Monitoring marketing exposures supports informed policymaking. This study presents a global overview of children's television advertising exposure to healthy and unhealthy products. Twenty-two countries contributed data, captured between 2008 and 2017. Advertisements were coded for the nature of foods and beverages, using the 2015 World Health Organization (WHO) Europe Nutrient Profile Model (should be permitted/not-permitted to be advertised). Peak viewing times were defined as the top five hour timeslots for children. On average, there were four times more advertisements for foods ...


Supporting Self-Regulated Learning In Online Learning Environments And Moocs: A Systematic Review, Jacqueline Wong, Martine Baars, Dan Davis, Tim Van Der Zee, Geert-Jan Houben, Fred Paas Jan 2019

Supporting Self-Regulated Learning In Online Learning Environments And Moocs: A Systematic Review, Jacqueline Wong, Martine Baars, Dan Davis, Tim Van Der Zee, Geert-Jan Houben, Fred Paas

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) allow learning to take place anytime and anywhere with little external monitoring by teachers. Characteristically, highly diverse groups of learners enrolled in MOOCs are required to make decisions related to their own learning activities to achieve academic success. Therefore, it is considered important to support self-regulated learning (SRL) strategies and adapt to relevant human factors (e.g., gender, cognitive abilities, prior knowledge). SRL supports have been widely investigated in traditional classroom settings, but little is known about how SRL can be supported in MOOCs. Very few experimental studies have been conducted in MOOCs at present ...


Cognitive Architecture And Instructional Design: 20 Years Later, John Sweller, Jeroen J. G Van Merrienboer, Fred Paas Jan 2019

Cognitive Architecture And Instructional Design: 20 Years Later, John Sweller, Jeroen J. G Van Merrienboer, Fred Paas

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Cognitive load theory was introduced in the 1980s as an instructional design theory based on several uncontroversial aspects of human cognitive architecture. Our knowledge of many of the characteristics of working memory, long-term memory and the relations between them had been well-established for many decades prior to the introduction of the theory. Curiously, this knowledge had had a limited impact on the field of instructional design with most instructional design recommendations proceeding as though working memory and long-term memory did not exist. In contrast, cognitive load theory emphasised that all novel information first is processed by a capacity and duration ...


Alteration To Hippocampal Volume And Shape Confined To Cannabis Dependence: A Multi-Site Study, Yann Chye, Valentina Lorenzetti, Chao Suo, Albert Batalla, Janna Cousijn, Anna Goudriaan, M D. Jenkinson, Rocio Martin-Santos, Sarah Whittle, Murat Yucel, Nadia Solowij Jan 2019

Alteration To Hippocampal Volume And Shape Confined To Cannabis Dependence: A Multi-Site Study, Yann Chye, Valentina Lorenzetti, Chao Suo, Albert Batalla, Janna Cousijn, Anna Goudriaan, M D. Jenkinson, Rocio Martin-Santos, Sarah Whittle, Murat Yucel, Nadia Solowij

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Cannabis use is highly prevalent and often considered to be relatively harmless. Nonetheless, a subset of regular cannabis users may develop dependence, experiencing poorer quality of life and greater mental health problems relative to non-dependent users. The neuroanatomy characterizing cannabis use versus dependence is poorly understood. We aimed to delineate the contributing role of cannabis use and dependence on morphology of the hippocampus, one of the most consistently altered brain regions in cannabis users, in a large multi-site dataset aggregated across four research sites. We compared hippocampal volume and vertex-level hippocampal shape differences (1) between 121 non-using controls and 140 ...


Water, Skin And Touch: Migrant Bathing Assemblages, Gordon R. Waitt, Louisa Welland Jan 2019

Water, Skin And Touch: Migrant Bathing Assemblages, Gordon R. Waitt, Louisa Welland

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

This paper offers a contribution to cultures of urban water research through household ethnographies conducted with 16 participants who migrated from Burma to Sydney, Australia. We draw on a strand of corporeal feminism and offer the concept of bathing assemblages to interpret how watery skin encounters provide clues to how participants washed themselves in their 'home' country may persist, transform or stop. Our analysis maps how dimensions of the self (ethical, gender, class, ethnic, national faith and others) are constituted by, and generative of, the felt intensities of watery encounters through different bathing assemblages. This paper illustrates how bathing practices ...


Viewpoints: Should Teaching Students Who Fail A Literacy And Numeracy Test Be Barred From Teaching?, Lynn D. Sheridan, Nan Bahr Jan 2019

Viewpoints: Should Teaching Students Who Fail A Literacy And Numeracy Test Be Barred From Teaching?, Lynn D. Sheridan, Nan Bahr

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Starting this month, teaching students who fail or haven't yet taken the Literacy and Numeracy Test for Initial Teacher Education (LANTITE) will not be able to teach in Victorian schools. Previously, around one in 20 teachers who had failed the test or hadn't taken it yet received provisional registration. Prospective students who took the test late in 2018 received their results on January 11.


Sleep-Dependent Selective Imitation In Infants, Carolin Konrad, Nora D. Dirks, Annegret Warmuth, Jane S. Herbert, Silvia Schneider, Sabine Seehagen Jan 2019

Sleep-Dependent Selective Imitation In Infants, Carolin Konrad, Nora D. Dirks, Annegret Warmuth, Jane S. Herbert, Silvia Schneider, Sabine Seehagen

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

In adults, sleep selectively consolidates those memories that are relevant for future events. The present study tested whether napping after encoding plays a role in selective memory consolidation in infants. Infants aged 15 and 24 months (n = 48 per age) were randomly assigned to a nap or a no-nap demonstration condition, or a baseline control condition. In the demonstration conditions, infants observed an experimenter perform an irrelevant action followed by a relevant action to achieve a desirable outcome on four different toys. Infant imitation of irrelevant and relevant actions was coded at a test session that occurred after a 24-hr ...


Associations Between Access To Healthcare, Environmental Quality, And End-Stage Renal Disease Survival Time: Proportional-Hazards Models Of Over 1,000,000 People Over 14 Years, Marissa Kosnik, David Reif, Danelle Lobdell, Thomas E. Astell-Burt, Xiaoqi Feng, John Hader, Jane Hoppin Jan 2019

Associations Between Access To Healthcare, Environmental Quality, And End-Stage Renal Disease Survival Time: Proportional-Hazards Models Of Over 1,000,000 People Over 14 Years, Marissa Kosnik, David Reif, Danelle Lobdell, Thomas E. Astell-Burt, Xiaoqi Feng, John Hader, Jane Hoppin

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the US increased by 74% from 2000 to 2013. To investigate the role of the broader environment on ESRD survival time, we evaluated average distance to the nearest hospital by county (as a surrogate for access to healthcare) and the Environmental Quality Index (EQI), an aggregate measure of ambient environmental quality composed of five domains (air, water, land, built, and sociodemographic), at the county level across the US. Associations between average hospital distance, EQI, and survival time for 1,092,281 people diagnosed with ESRD between 2000 and 2013 (age 18+, without changes ...


Energy Expenditure Associated With Posture Transitions In Preschool Children, Katherine Downing, Xanne Janssen, Dylan P. Cliff, Anthony D. Okely, John J. Reilly Jan 2019

Energy Expenditure Associated With Posture Transitions In Preschool Children, Katherine Downing, Xanne Janssen, Dylan P. Cliff, Anthony D. Okely, John J. Reilly

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Background Despite growing scientific interest in the benefits of breaking up sedentary time with intermittent standing or walking, few studies have investigated the energy cost of posture transitions. This study aimed to determine whether posture transitions are associated with increased energy expenditure in preschool children. Methods Forty children (mean age 5.3 ± 1.0y) completed a ~150-min room calorimeter protocol involving sedentary, light, and moderate- to vigorous-intensity activities. This study utilised data from ~65-min of the protocol, during which children were undertaking sedentary behaviours (TV viewing, drawing/colouring in, and playing with toys on the floor). Posture was coded as ...


Comparing Regulatory And Non-Regulatory Indices Of Early Childhood Education And Care (Ecec) Quality In The Australian Early Childhood Sector, Iram Siraj, Steven J. Howard, Denise Kingston, Cathrine Marguerite Neilsen-Hewett, Edward Melhuish, Marc De Rosnay Jan 2019

Comparing Regulatory And Non-Regulatory Indices Of Early Childhood Education And Care (Ecec) Quality In The Australian Early Childhood Sector, Iram Siraj, Steven J. Howard, Denise Kingston, Cathrine Marguerite Neilsen-Hewett, Edward Melhuish, Marc De Rosnay

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

This study examines associations between Australia's regulatory ratings of quality in early childhood education and care (ECEC)-the National Quality Standard (NQS)-and two research-based quality rating scales. The analytic sample consisted of 257 ECEC services across three Australian states. Results indicated (1) modest positive associations between NQS ratings and scale scores; (2) some specificity between NQS quality areas (educational programs and practice; relationships with children) and one research scale-the Sustained Shared Thinking and Emotional Wellbeing (SSTEW) scale; (3) variability in quality scales scores within each NQS designation; and (4) mitigation of these associations when the time-gap between ratings ...


Mental Health Presentations To Acute Psychiatric Services: 3-Year Study Of Prevalence And Readmission Risk For Personality Disorders Compared With Psychotic, Affective, Substance Or Other Disorders, Kate L. Lewis, Mahnaz Fanaian, Beth Kotze, Brin F. S Grenyer Jan 2019

Mental Health Presentations To Acute Psychiatric Services: 3-Year Study Of Prevalence And Readmission Risk For Personality Disorders Compared With Psychotic, Affective, Substance Or Other Disorders, Kate L. Lewis, Mahnaz Fanaian, Beth Kotze, Brin F. S Grenyer

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Background The relative burden and risk of readmission for people with personality disorders in hospital settings is unknown. Aims To compare hospital use of people with personality disorder with that of people with other mental health diagnoses, such as psychoses and affective disorders. Method Naturalistic study of hospital presentations for mental health in a large community catchment. Mixed-effects Cox regression and survival curves were generated to examine risk of readmission for each group. Results Of 2894 people presenting to hospital, patients with personality disorder represented 20.5% of emergency and 26.6% of in-patients. Patients with personality disorder or psychoses ...


An Internet-Supported School Physical Activity Intervention In Low Socioeconomic Status Communities: Results From The Activity And Motivation In Physical Education (Amped) Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial, Chris Lonsdale, Aidan Lester, Katherine B. Owen, Rhiannon L. White, Louisa R. Peralta, Morwenna Kirwan, Thierno M.O Diallo, Anthony Maeder, Andrew Bennie, Freya Macmillan, Gregory S. Kolt, Nikos Ntoumanis, Jennifer M. Gore, Ester Cerin, Dylan P. Cliff, David R. Lubans Jan 2019

An Internet-Supported School Physical Activity Intervention In Low Socioeconomic Status Communities: Results From The Activity And Motivation In Physical Education (Amped) Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial, Chris Lonsdale, Aidan Lester, Katherine B. Owen, Rhiannon L. White, Louisa R. Peralta, Morwenna Kirwan, Thierno M.O Diallo, Anthony Maeder, Andrew Bennie, Freya Macmillan, Gregory S. Kolt, Nikos Ntoumanis, Jennifer M. Gore, Ester Cerin, Dylan P. Cliff, David R. Lubans

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Objective Quality physical education (PE) is the cornerstone of comprehensive school physical activity (PA) promotion programmes. We tested the efficacy of a teacher professional learning intervention, delivered partially via the internet, designed to maximise opportunities for students to be active during PE lessons and enhance adolescents’ motivation towards PE and PA.

Methods A two-arm cluster randomised controlled trial with teachers and Grade 8 students from secondary schools in low socioeconomic areas of Western Sydney, Australia. The Activity and Motivation in Physical Education (AMPED) intervention for secondary school PE teachers included workshops, online learning, implementation tasks and mentoring sessions. The primary ...


There's No Evidence 5g Is Going To Harm Our Health, So Let's Stop Worrying About It, Sarah P. Loughran Jan 2019

There's No Evidence 5g Is Going To Harm Our Health, So Let's Stop Worrying About It, Sarah P. Loughran

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Hype continues to surround the roll-out of 5G technology in Australia and across the world. While there is promise of faster network speeds, and talk of exciting technologies like driverless cars, there's also a growing movement to stop the implementation of 5G due to concerns about the effects it may have on our health. But the scientific evidence we've got assures us there's no reason to worry. The radio frequencies powering 5G will be well below the exposure limits known to cause harm.


Vascular Effects On The Bold Response And The Retinotopic Mapping Of Hv4, H Boyd Taylor, Alexander M. Puckett, Zoey J. Isherwood, Mark M. Schira Jan 2019

Vascular Effects On The Bold Response And The Retinotopic Mapping Of Hv4, H Boyd Taylor, Alexander M. Puckett, Zoey J. Isherwood, Mark M. Schira

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Despite general acceptance that the retinotopic organisation of human V4 (hV4) takes the form of a single, uninterrupted ventral hemifield, measured retinotopic maps of this visual area are often incomplete. Here, we test hypotheses that artefact from draining veins close to hV4 cause inverted BOLD responses that may serve to obscure a portion of the lower visual quarterfield-including the lower vertical meridian-in some hemispheres. We further test whether correcting such responses can restore the 'missing' retinotopic coverage in hV4. Subjects (N = 10) viewed bowtie, ring, drifting bar and full field flash stimuli. Functional EPIs were acquired over approximately 1.5h ...


Sms Sos: A Randomized Controlled Trial To Reduce Self-Harm And Suicide Attempts Using Sms Text Messaging, Garry J. Stevens, Trent Hammond, Suzanne Brownhill, Manish Anand, Anabel De La Riva, Jean Hawkins, Tristan Chapman, Richard Baldacchino, Jo Micallef, Jagadeesh Andepalli, Anita Kotak, Naren Gunja, Andrew Page, Grahame V. Gould, Christopher Ryan, Ian Whyte, Gregory L. Carter, Alison L. Jones Jan 2019

Sms Sos: A Randomized Controlled Trial To Reduce Self-Harm And Suicide Attempts Using Sms Text Messaging, Garry J. Stevens, Trent Hammond, Suzanne Brownhill, Manish Anand, Anabel De La Riva, Jean Hawkins, Tristan Chapman, Richard Baldacchino, Jo Micallef, Jagadeesh Andepalli, Anita Kotak, Naren Gunja, Andrew Page, Grahame V. Gould, Christopher Ryan, Ian Whyte, Gregory L. Carter, Alison L. Jones

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Background: Hospital-treated deliberate self-harm (DSH) is common, costly and has high repetition rates. Since brief contact interventions (BCIs) may reduce the risk of DSH repetition, we aim to evaluate whether a SMS (Short Message Service) text message Intervention plus Treatment As Usual (TAU) compared to TAU alone will reduce hospital DSH re-presentation rates in Western Sydney public hospitals in Australia. Methods/design: Our study is a 24-month randomized controlled trial (RCT). Adult patients who present with DSH to hospital emergency, psychiatric, and mental health triage and assessment departments will be randomly assigned to an Intervention condition plus TAU receiving nine ...


David Gillespie's 'Teen Brain': A Valid Argument Let Down By Selective Science And Over-The-Top Claims, Sarah P. Loughran Jan 2019

David Gillespie's 'Teen Brain': A Valid Argument Let Down By Selective Science And Over-The-Top Claims, Sarah P. Loughran

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Screen time has arguably become the most concerning aspect of development for modern-day parents. A 2015 poll identified children's excessive screen time as the number one concern for parents, overtaking more traditional concerns such as obesity and not getting enough physical activity.


Does Dissatisfaction With, Or Accurate Perception Of Overweight Status Help People Reduce Weight? Longitudinal Study Of Australian Adults, Xiaoqi Feng, Andrew Wilson Jan 2019

Does Dissatisfaction With, Or Accurate Perception Of Overweight Status Help People Reduce Weight? Longitudinal Study Of Australian Adults, Xiaoqi Feng, Andrew Wilson

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Background: With studies around the world suggesting a large proportion of people do not recognise that they are overweight (or feel satisfied with being overweight), this fuels the view that such 'misperceptions' need to be 'corrected'. However, few longitudinal studies have examined the consequences of under-perceived weight status, nor over-perceived weight status (when a person feels overweight when they are not) and weight-related satisfaction on trajectories in body mass index (BMI).

Methods: Five-year BMI trajectories were examined among 8174 participants in an Australian nationally representative cohort. Each person was classified into groups according to their neighbourhood socioeconomic circumstances, baseline BMI ...


Developing And Applying A Deductive Coding Framework To Assess The Goals Of Citizen/Community Jury Deliberations, Anna Mae Scott, Rebecca Sims, Christopher J. Degeling, Stacy M. Carter, Rae Thomas Jan 2019

Developing And Applying A Deductive Coding Framework To Assess The Goals Of Citizen/Community Jury Deliberations, Anna Mae Scott, Rebecca Sims, Christopher J. Degeling, Stacy M. Carter, Rae Thomas

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Background: Public participation in health policy decision making is thought to improve the quality of the decisions and enhance their legitimacy. Citizen/Community Juries (CJs) are a form of public participation that aims to elicit an informed community perspective on controversial topics. Reporting standards for CJ processes have already been proposed. However, less clarity exists about the standards for what constitutes a good quality CJ deliberation-we aim to begin to address this gap here.

Methods: We identified the goals that underlie CJs and searched the literature to identify existing frameworks assessing the quality of CJ deliberations. We then mapped the ...


Understanding Non-Vaccinating Parents' Views To Inform And Improve Clinical Encounters: A Qualitative Study In An Australian Community, Catherine Helps, Julie Leask, Lesley M. Barclay, Stacy M. Carter Jan 2019

Understanding Non-Vaccinating Parents' Views To Inform And Improve Clinical Encounters: A Qualitative Study In An Australian Community, Catherine Helps, Julie Leask, Lesley M. Barclay, Stacy M. Carter

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Objectives: To explain vaccination refusal in a sample of Australian parents.

Design: Qualitative design, purposive sampling in a defined population.

Setting: A geographically bounded community of approximately 30 000 people in regional Australia with high prevalence of vaccination refusal.

Participants: Semi structured interviews with 32 non-vaccinating parents: 9 fathers, 22 mothers and 1 pregnant woman. Purposive sampling of parents who had decided to discontinue or decline all vaccinations for their children.

Recruitment: via local advertising then snowballing.

Results: Thematic analysis focused on explaining decision-making pathways of parents who refuse vaccination. Common patterns in parents' accounts included: perceived deterioration in health ...


People Living In Rural Areas May Be At Lower Risk Of Alzheimer's Disease, Thomas E. Astell-Burt, Xiaoqi Feng Jan 2019

People Living In Rural Areas May Be At Lower Risk Of Alzheimer's Disease, Thomas E. Astell-Burt, Xiaoqi Feng

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

People who live in regional or remote areas may be at lower risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, according to our recent research. Using data from more 260,000 adults in New South Wales who were aged 45 and over, we found those living in regional or remote areas of the state had a 6% to 19% lower risk of being diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease over 11 years, compared with their city counterparts.


Narrative Identity Reconstruction As Adaptive Growth During Mental Health Recovery: A Narrative Coaching Boardgame Approach, Douglas Kerr, Frank P. Deane, Trevor P. Crowe Jan 2019

Narrative Identity Reconstruction As Adaptive Growth During Mental Health Recovery: A Narrative Coaching Boardgame Approach, Douglas Kerr, Frank P. Deane, Trevor P. Crowe

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Objective: The purpose of this paper is to construct a conceptual framework for investigating the reconstruction of narrative identity in mental health recovery from a complexity perspective. This conceptual framework provides the foundation for developing a health boardgame to facilitate narrative identity reconstruction.

Methods: A selective integrative review of the theoretical and empirical literature relevant to narrative identity reconstruction in recovery was conducted. Sources included books, dissertations, internet resources, and professional journals.

Findings: The reviewed material provides a conceptual framework that offers an enriched understanding of narrative identity reconstruction in recovery as a process of adaptive growth. It identifies the ...


A Protocol For A Discrete Choice Experiment: Understanding Patient Medicine Preferences For Managing Chronic Non-Cancer Pain, Marian D. Shanahan, Briony K. Larance, Suzanne Nielsen, Milton Cohen, Maria Schaffer, Gabrielle Campbell Jan 2019

A Protocol For A Discrete Choice Experiment: Understanding Patient Medicine Preferences For Managing Chronic Non-Cancer Pain, Marian D. Shanahan, Briony K. Larance, Suzanne Nielsen, Milton Cohen, Maria Schaffer, Gabrielle Campbell

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Introduction: High rates of chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP), concerns about adverse effects including dependence among those prescribed potent pain medicines, the recent evidence supporting active rather than passive management strategies and a lack of funding for holistic programme have resulted in challenges around decision making for treatment among clinicians and their patients. Discrete choice experiments (DCEs) are one way of assessing and valuing treatment preferences. Here, we outline a protocol for a study that assesses patient preferences for CNCP treatment.

Methods and analysis: A final list of attributes (and their levels) for the DCE was generated using a detailed iterative ...


Increasing Tree Cover May Be Like A 'Superfood' For Community Mental Health, Thomas E. Astell-Burt, Xiaoqi Feng Jan 2019

Increasing Tree Cover May Be Like A 'Superfood' For Community Mental Health, Thomas E. Astell-Burt, Xiaoqi Feng

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Increasing tree canopy and green cover across Greater Sydney and increasing the proportion of homes in urban areas within 10 minutes' walk of quality green, open and public space are among the New South Wales premier's new priorities. Cities around Australia have similar goals. In our latest study, we asked if more of any green space will do? Or does the type of green space matter for our mental health?


Association Of Urban Green Space With Mental Health And General Health Among Adults In Australia, Thomas E. Astell-Burt, Xiaoqi Feng Jan 2019

Association Of Urban Green Space With Mental Health And General Health Among Adults In Australia, Thomas E. Astell-Burt, Xiaoqi Feng

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Importance: Recent studies indicate that living near more green space may support mental and general health and may also prevent depression. However, most studies are cross-sectional, and few have considered whether some types of green space matter more for mental health.

Objective: To assess whether total green space or specific types of green space are associated with better mental health.

Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study included a residentially stable, city-dwelling sample of 46786 participants from Sydney, Wollongong, and Newcastle, Australia, in the baseline of the Sax Institute's 45 and Up Study (data collected from January 1, 2006 ...


Riots In West Papua: Why Indonesia Needs To Answer For Its Broken Promises, Camellia B. Webb-Gannon Jan 2019

Riots In West Papua: Why Indonesia Needs To Answer For Its Broken Promises, Camellia B. Webb-Gannon

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Last weekend, the Indonesian police took 43 West Papuan students into custody for allegedly disrespecting the Indonesian flag during an independence day celebration (an allegation the students deny). Police stormed the students' dorm and used teargas to force them out, while bystanders and officers called them "monkeys", a derogatory term for ethnically Melanesian Papuans. West Papuans have long been cast by Indonesians as primitive people from the Stone Age, and this racist treatment continues to this day. West Papuan author Filep Karma described the extent of racism against West Papuans in his 2014 book, As If We Are Half-Animal: Indonesia ...


Proposing A Haptic Approach To Facilitating L2 Learners' Pragmatic Competence, Michael S. Burri, Amanda Ann Baker, William Acton Jan 2019

Proposing A Haptic Approach To Facilitating L2 Learners' Pragmatic Competence, Michael S. Burri, Amanda Ann Baker, William Acton

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Pragmatic competence plays a critical role in successful communication. Pragmatics in the second language classroom has received substantial interest in TESOL, yet teachers often find the teaching of pragmatics challenging. Instruction generally tends to focus on grammar and vocabulary development, even though pragmatics is closely linked to the sound system (i.e., phonology) of the language. An effective method should combine attention to both pragmatic and phonological competence. We propose an integrated approach, drawing on haptic (movement and touch) pronunciation teaching techniques (Acton, Baker, Burri & Teaman, 2013) to facilitate study and uptake of pragmatics in the classroom. In part by ...


Building Conceptual Knowledge Of Fraction Operations Among Pre-Service Teachers: Effect Of A Representation-Based Teaching Approach Within A Teacher Education Program, Elise J. Thurtell, Patricia A. Forrester, Mohan Chinnappan Jan 2019

Building Conceptual Knowledge Of Fraction Operations Among Pre-Service Teachers: Effect Of A Representation-Based Teaching Approach Within A Teacher Education Program, Elise J. Thurtell, Patricia A. Forrester, Mohan Chinnappan

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

A deep understanding of fraction concepts and operations is necessary if pre-service teachers (PSTs) are to present the concepts in multiple forms to learners. Such an understanding needs to be grounded in rich conceptual knowledge. In the present study, we explore the development of this understanding by supporting a cohort of 103 PSTs, who had previously demonstrated poor conceptual understanding of fraction concepts and operations, with a Representational Reasoning in Teaching and Learning (RRTL) approach aimed at strengthening their conceptual knowledge. A comparison of pre- and post-test results indicated that participants showed a significant improvement in shifting the balance of ...