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Full-Text Articles in African American Studies

Who’S Your Mammy?: Figuring Aunt Jemima, Harrison W. Inefuku May 2007

Who’S Your Mammy?: Figuring Aunt Jemima, Harrison W. Inefuku

Harrison W. Inefuku

In existence for over a century, the advertising icon Aunt Jemima remains a point of contention for many African Americans, despite a recent makeover that attempted to remove visual signifiers of slavery. To understand the icon's negativity, I explore its roots in slavery,the minstrel stage and The Exhibition of the Other. I then move to an analysis of "The Legend of Aunt Jemima," a series of advertisements produced in the 1920s, to determine how racism was manifested in the icon*s promotional materials.


Who's Your Mammy?: Figuring And Refiguring Aunt Jemima, Harrison W. Inefuku May 2007

Who's Your Mammy?: Figuring And Refiguring Aunt Jemima, Harrison W. Inefuku

Harrison W. Inefuku

In existence since the late 1890s, advertising icon Aunt Jemima has been indelibly etched into the American memory—virtually unchanged from her debut until her makeover in 1989. Before this recent transformation, Aunt Jemima was the quintessential embodiment of the mammy stereotype—a heavyset black woman, complete with apron and bandana. Her creation was situated at the locus of several racist traditions and discourses directed towards African Americans—the mammy stereotype, the minstrel show, The Myth of the Old South, and the Exhibition of the Other. This embodiment of multiple racist practices helps to explain how the mammy in general ...


Review Of Only One Place Of Redress: African Americans, Labor Regulations, And The Courts From Reconstruction To The New Deal, Brian D. Behnken Oct 2004

Review Of Only One Place Of Redress: African Americans, Labor Regulations, And The Courts From Reconstruction To The New Deal, Brian D. Behnken

Brian D. Behnken

In Only One Place of Redress, David Bernstein contends that between 1890 and 1937 American courts aided black workers in labor disputes. The court did this by upholding the freedom of contract doctrine enshrined in Lochner v. New York, the 1905 case that invalidated legislation limiting the hours a baker could work. "Lochnerism" or "Lochnerian jurisprudence," as Bernstein calls it, benefited blacks by voiding discriminatory labor laws, and he illuminates how these labor regulations harmed African Americans. "The Supreme Court," he writes, "was relatively sympathetic to plaintiffs who challenged government regulations, especially occupational regulations, as violations of the implicit constitutional ...


Review Of A Stone Of Hope: Prophetic Religion And The Death Of Jim Crow By David L. Chappell, Brian D. Behnken Apr 2004

Review Of A Stone Of Hope: Prophetic Religion And The Death Of Jim Crow By David L. Chappell, Brian D. Behnken

Brian D. Behnken

In this provocative new book, David Chappell examines the role of religion and religious thought in the Civil Rights movement. By focusing on the intellectual and religious underpinnings of both the activists and their segregationist rivals, he makes a persuasive argument that the struggle should best be understood as a prophetic religious movement, rather than as a social movement or as the triumph of a liberal consensus. Scrutinizing religion allows Chappell to shift the historiographical debate away from protests and violence to the role of ideas, principles, and faith.