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From Slave Cabins To The White House: Homemaking Anxiety In African American Culture, Koritha Mitchell 2016 Ohio State University - Main Campus

From Slave Cabins To The White House: Homemaking Anxiety In African American Culture, Koritha Mitchell

Koritha Mitchell

A book-length study of what I call "homemaking anxiety," which I first began defining in the article "Mamie Bradley's Unbearable Burden." It is "the palpable tension that emerges when African Americans, especially women, continue to invest in homemaking even while seeing the signs that it won't yield for them the respectability or safety that it should." This project traces the imprint this tension has left on black cultural production, from slavery to the Age of Michelle Obama. Performance theory influences my examination of a wide array of texts—whether novels, plays, or the performance text that is Mrs ...


A Dark Record: Criminal Discourse And The African American Literary Project, 1721-1864, Brian Baaki 2016 Graduate Center, City University of New York

A Dark Record: Criminal Discourse And The African American Literary Project, 1721-1864, Brian Baaki

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

A Dark Record charts the emergence and traces the evolution of a central figure in American culture, the myth of the black criminal. It does so both to explore the ideological effects of print, and to present an alternative history of African American literature. Historians have long maintained that the association of African Americans with crime solidified in our national culture during the post-Reconstruction period, the nadir for African American civil rights, with a corresponding rise in the over-policing of black individuals and communities. For its part, my study looks back from the post-Reconstruction period, and examines the role earlier ...


Unique And Diverse Voices Of African American Women In Engineering At Predominately White Institutions: Unpacking Individual Experiences And Factors Shaping Degree Completion, Ellise M. Davis LaMotte 2016 University of Massachusetts Boston

Unique And Diverse Voices Of African American Women In Engineering At Predominately White Institutions: Unpacking Individual Experiences And Factors Shaping Degree Completion, Ellise M. Davis Lamotte

Graduate Doctoral Dissertations

In 2012, 1% of the African American women who enrolled in an undergraduate engineering program four years prior graduated, amounting to 862 African American women graduating with engineering degrees. This qualitative study, anchored in interpretive phenomenological methodology, utilized undergraduate socialization with an overarching critical race theory lens to examine the manner in which African American women in engineering, such as the 862, make meaning of their experiences at predominately White institutions.

The findings of the study are important because they corroborated existing research findings and more importantly, the findings in this study emphasize the importance of faculty and institutional agent ...


My Neighborhood Is Changing: Positive Youth Development In The Historic Near East Side, Fevean N. Keflom 2016 SIT Graduate Institute

My Neighborhood Is Changing: Positive Youth Development In The Historic Near East Side, Fevean N. Keflom

Capstone Collection

In this paper, I consider the impact of positive youth development in the lives of Black youth, in the Historic Near East Side of Columbus, OH. More specifically, I examine initiatives centered in cultural arts, holistic support, and African centered education in order to identify positive trends impacting urban Black youth. My research is guided by the question: How are Black youth impacted by urban development in a historic African-American neighborhood?

The Near East Side(NES) is a distinguished neighborhood, and in the past laid the foundation for some of the most prominent and successful African American owned businesses in ...


Guess Who's Coming To Dinner?: Food Inequlaity And Black Americans, Christina Foster 2016 SIT Graduate Institute

Guess Who's Coming To Dinner?: Food Inequlaity And Black Americans, Christina Foster

Capstone Collection

Food insecurity is an issue that plagues many people throughout the world. It only requires a brief search on the United Nation’s (U.N.) World Hunger Map to determine that this is indeed a worldwide crisis. Conversely, within the United States, the issue of hunger is often treated as “minimal” in comparison to other countries. A deeper inquiry into hunger within the U.S. reveals an even more disturbing connection: the role of white supremacy and systemic racism in regard to hunger. Academic research pertaining to food access is quite recent. Be that as it may, it is of ...


Two Poems: Black Love (For Anyone) And Ms., Frederick Douglass Alcorn Ed.D 2016 University of Puget Sound

Two Poems: Black Love (For Anyone) And Ms., Frederick Douglass Alcorn Ed.D

Race and Pedagogy Journal: Teaching and Learning for Justice

No abstract provided.


Black Lives Matter: Why Black Feminism?, AnaLexicis T. Bridewell 2016 Loyola Marymount University

Black Lives Matter: Why Black Feminism?, Analexicis T. Bridewell

First-Gen Voices: Creative and Critical Narratives on the First-Generation College Experience

In this essay, the author explores the inclusive nature and focal range of the Black Lives Matter movement in an effort to demonstrate how the goals of the movement are grounded in Black feminism. Ultimately, Bridewell concludes that creating inclusive spaces for the exploration of intersectional identities can help bring justice and equality not only to the Black community, but to all lives that have be oppressed or marginalized.


The Exile Of Assata Shakur: Marronage And American Borders, Joe Kaplan 2016 University of Puget Sound

The Exile Of Assata Shakur: Marronage And American Borders, Joe Kaplan

History Theses

Former Black Panther, Assata Shakur, now living in exile in Cuba after breaking out of a U.S. prison, is a self-described escaped slave, or maroon. Shakur has adopted this identity to underscore how practices and ideologies developed under slavery continue to structure Black life in the Americas, and how resistance strategies produced by this historical milieu remain salient in critiques of modern U.S. state power. The transnational nature of Shakur’s flight points to the use of borders as a highly effective, yet overlooked, tactic of Black resistance that has both historical and contemporary relevance. For maroons, borders ...


The Turning Point Of Who Shall Be Master: Killer Of Sheep, Naming, Gender, And The Gaze Of African American Women, Sean Davis Watkins 2016 Kennesaw State University

The Turning Point Of Who Shall Be Master: Killer Of Sheep, Naming, Gender, And The Gaze Of African American Women, Sean Davis Watkins

Master of Arts in American Studies Capstones

Charles Burnett’s 1978 award-winning film Killer of Sheep directly responded to the then-popular Blaxploitation genre, holding a mirror up to post-Watts, 1970s America, while exposing and exploring gender and race issues. Moreover, intentionally or not, Burnett, with this film, effectively demonstrated the lack of recognition that Black women faced in domestic, activist, and employment spheres; simultaneously, Burnett conspicuously reified the relegation of women into that silent, domestic sphere while challenging stereotypes of Black men, elevating them and establishing them as humans, capable of hubris, humanity, and vulnerability. This neo-realistic film masterfully rebirthed the African American male identity; unfortunately, though ...


The Texts We Play: Avatar Creation And Racial Invisibility In Role-Playing Video Games, Daniel L. Archer 2016 Abilene Christian University

The Texts We Play: Avatar Creation And Racial Invisibility In Role-Playing Video Games, Daniel L. Archer

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

This project sets out to address problems of racial inequalities in role-playing video games as part of a growing field of video game studies in literary criticism. As these games are an increasingly popular form of entertainment in contemporary culture, their potential effects on players cannot be ignored. If these games continue to reflect society in a way that perpetuates racist stereotypes, social progress will halt. In order to study these games from a literary perspective, then, this project combines both narratological and ludological approaches to video game studies in order to bring about new insight from two strong perspectives ...


Rewriting Rebellions: The Manichean Allegory And Imperial Ideology In The Works Of H.G. De Lisser, Rachael Mackenzie MacLean 2016 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Rewriting Rebellions: The Manichean Allegory And Imperial Ideology In The Works Of H.G. De Lisser, Rachael Mackenzie Maclean

University of Tennessee Honors Thesis Projects

No abstract provided.


The Political Illegitimacy Of "Superstition:" Obeah After The Morant Bay Rebellion, 1865-1900, Rachael Mackenzie MacLean 2016 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

The Political Illegitimacy Of "Superstition:" Obeah After The Morant Bay Rebellion, 1865-1900, Rachael Mackenzie Maclean

University of Tennessee Honors Thesis Projects

No abstract provided.


Two Strivings: Uplift And Identity In African American Rhetorical Culture, 1900-1943, Jansen Blake Werner 2016 University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Two Strivings: Uplift And Identity In African American Rhetorical Culture, 1900-1943, Jansen Blake Werner

Theses and Dissertations

During the late nineteenth- and early twentieth century, the notion of “uplift” functioned as a major thematic within African American rhetorical culture. In this milieu, “uplift” generally connoted a sense of collective self-help. However, in contrast to more generalized reform efforts, uplift was expressed as a distinctly intraracial endeavor. That is, rather than overtly leveraging the dominant white society to enact legal or political reforms, uplift typically centered on the ways in which African Americans could enhance the quality of black life independent from white involvement.

Understood as public proposals for how African Americans could employ forms of self-help to ...


Reparations For Slavery In The United States, Alicia G. Kinsellagh 2016 University of San Francisco

Reparations For Slavery In The United States, Alicia G. Kinsellagh

Creative Activity and Research Day - CARD

After the Civil War, freed slaves were promised “40 acres and a mule” to start new lives. This plan was opposed and following proposals for reparations have been opposed since. The majority of U.S. citizens believe that reparations are unnecessary because no living person is responsible for slavery, arguing that there is no “legacy of slavery.” However, others believe that African Americans today are still impacted by the vestiges of slavery. Thus, all U.S. citizens share responsibility for slavery’s legacy. This project explores the arguments for and against giving reparations to African Americans.

Keywords: reparations, “legacy of ...


The Colonial Roots Of The Racial Fetishization Of Black Women, Caren M. Holmes 2016 College of Wooster

The Colonial Roots Of The Racial Fetishization Of Black Women, Caren M. Holmes

Black & Gold

In my research, I examined the history of sexual debasement and abuse of black women throughout American history and its influence of modern racial fetishization. In my paper, I explore the influence of European colonial thought on these modern realities. I argue that the conquest and feminization of the New World led to the dehumanization and conquest of African women who were perceived by colonialists to be byproducts of manifest destiny. My research reflects how the sexual debasement experienced by black women throughout American history has led to the racial fetishization prevalent today. I also consider how this history of ...


10, Shaneka King 2016 Georgia State University

10, Shaneka King

Georgia State Undergraduate Research Conference

No abstract provided.


Fearless Friday: Senait Weldemariam, Senait S. Weldemariam 2016 Gettysburg College

Fearless Friday: Senait Weldemariam, Senait S. Weldemariam

SURGE

Senait Weldemariam ’16 is today’s Fearless Leader! Senait, originally from the Bronx, NY, is currently a senior at Gettysburg College who is majoring in History and minoring in Educational Studies. During her time here, she has been involved with the Black Student Union (BSU), the Gospel Choir, and the Latin American Student Association (LASA). Specifically, Senait has been involved with the BSU since her freshman year. [excerpt]


What Does Black Librarianship Look Like In The Proverbial Information Age?, S. Michele Echols 2016 College of New Rochelle

What Does Black Librarianship Look Like In The Proverbial Information Age?, S. Michele Echols

S. Echols

No abstract provided.


"I Began To Realize That I Had Some Friends:" Hardship, Resistance, Cooperation, And Unity In Hartford's African American Community, 1833-1841, Evan Turiano 2016 Trinity College, Hartford Connecticut

"I Began To Realize That I Had Some Friends:" Hardship, Resistance, Cooperation, And Unity In Hartford's African American Community, 1833-1841, Evan Turiano

Senior Theses and Projects

This thesis explores Hartford's black community between 1833 and 1841, looking at the exclusion they faced and the ways in which they resisted against it, focusing on four key moments to tell this story. It seeks to use this setting as a platform to make a case for the importance, and uniqueness, of the contributions of antebellum Northern black communities to the rise of antislavery.


Black Genocide, Reproductive Control, And The Crisis Pregnancy Center Movement: A Conspiracy Narrative Of Racial Hegemonic Order, Jordan Taffet 2016 College of William and Mary

Black Genocide, Reproductive Control, And The Crisis Pregnancy Center Movement: A Conspiracy Narrative Of Racial Hegemonic Order, Jordan Taffet

College of William & Mary Undergraduate Honors Theses

Over the past several decades, many individuals, organizations, and movements have brought attention to the role of race within the setting of reproduction by highlighting the possibility of black genocide. In particular, the crisis pregnancy center movement has appropriated this narrative in order to fulfill a pro-life agenda. By tracing and comparing the histories of the black genocide narrative and the crisis pregnancy center movement, I underline the various vulnerabilities within the crisis pregnancy center movement's use of the black genocide narrative.


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