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Utilizing A Stress And Coping Model Into A Preventive Abusive Head Trauma Parent/Caregiver Educational Program, Camile Williams 2021 The University of San Francisco

Utilizing A Stress And Coping Model Into A Preventive Abusive Head Trauma Parent/Caregiver Educational Program, Camile Williams

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Projects

Abusive head trauma (AHT) is a serious form of child maltreatment that is the primary cause of fatal head injuries in children younger than 24 months and is the cause for over 50% of severe or fatal traumatic brain injury incidences. These injuries can be caused by impact, shaking, or the combination of shaking and impact. These multi-factorial injuries can cause intracranial and spinal damage, retinal hemorrhages, and fractures of ribs and other bones. The age and severity of injuries will be used to assess the diagnosis of AHT. When AHT occurs, it is often tied to the behavior from ...


Prenatal Dietary Education, Using The Midwifery Model, In Ireland Vs The United States, Allison Erby 2021 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Prenatal Dietary Education, Using The Midwifery Model, In Ireland Vs The United States, Allison Erby

The Eleanor Mann School of Nursing Undergraduate Honors Theses

Prenatal dietary education is a very important component of care in healthy pregnancies, but more than that, dietary education can be an indicator of the value a healthcare provider places on holistic care or preventive medicine. The United States and Ireland are compared in this study because they represent high intervention vs. low intervention approaches, respectively, to obstetric care. Healthcare professionals from the United States and Ireland perceive the most important nutrients and method of receiving those differently. Maybe the most telling contrast, healthcare professionals in Ireland perceive food as the way pregnant women should receive vital nutrients, but healthcare ...


Tiny Tusks Internship: The Effect Of Health Care Providers' Education And Attitudes Toward Breastfeeding On The Mother's Decision To Breastfeed, Jocelyn Clark 2021 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Tiny Tusks Internship: The Effect Of Health Care Providers' Education And Attitudes Toward Breastfeeding On The Mother's Decision To Breastfeed, Jocelyn Clark

The Eleanor Mann School of Nursing Undergraduate Honors Theses

There is a stigma surrounding breastfeeding in the public community, places of employment, and health care facilities. This paper focuses on the impact health care workers have on the mother's decision to breastfeed her infant, and her ability to continue breastfeeding as the primary source of infant nutrition. This paper includes experiences from an internship with Tiny Tusks, which provides breastfeeding support to mothers in the Northwest Arkansas area. Tiny Tusks allows for a better understanding of the community's breastfeeding needs and provides support to breastfeeding mothers in order to reduce the stigma associated with breastfeeding. In health ...


Tiny Tusks Internship And Electronic Application Use Among Breastfeeding Mothers, Amanda Herman 2021 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Tiny Tusks Internship And Electronic Application Use Among Breastfeeding Mothers, Amanda Herman

The Eleanor Mann School of Nursing Undergraduate Honors Theses

The United States (U.S.) lags behind most of the world in terms of breastfeeding rates despite all the research supporting the numerous benefits for both mother and baby. That said, the majority of the U.S. population also utilizes mobile health and internet for information on health illnesses and promotion. This paper synthesizes available statistics concerning mobile application usage and breastfeeding mothers. The objective was to determine why apps are utilized, general opinions of the apps, and the benefits and drawbacks of using such technology.


Tiny Tusks Internship: The Importance Of Breastfeeding Education In The Workplace, Gianna Hogan 2021 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Tiny Tusks Internship: The Importance Of Breastfeeding Education In The Workplace, Gianna Hogan

The Eleanor Mann School of Nursing Undergraduate Honors Theses

Breastfeeding education in public, especially in the workplace, is a concept that has a multitude of different perspectives. Research has shown that breastfeeding has many positive effects on mother and baby, that can be lessened due to the lack of breastfeeding support in various organizations. In this literature review, barriers to breastfeeding in the workplace were analyzed in order to understand the effects these barriers have on breastfeeding duration. In addition, this review helped emphasize the need for policies to be enacted in the workplace to better support breastfeeding mothers, and the impact these policies have on employee retention rates ...


Tiny Tusks Internship: Barriers To Breastfeeding, Cameron Watson 2021 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Tiny Tusks Internship: Barriers To Breastfeeding, Cameron Watson

The Eleanor Mann School of Nursing Undergraduate Honors Theses

Tiny Tusks Breastfeeding and Infant Support Internship allows students to gain insight on breastfeeding practices through volunteering at University of Arkansas sporting events. Therefore, I chose to review prevalent barriers to breastfeeding that mothers in the United States face. These mothers were at least one of these: Hispanic, Marshallese, African American, disabled, employed, a veteran, living in a rural area, or a woman of the general American population. This topic is relevant because of the many benefits that breastfeeding provides for both the baby and the mother.


Impact Of Group Prenatal Care On Health Outcomes For Women Of Color In The United States: A Systematic Literature Review, Morgan Brockington, Emily Bauer, Julie Kameisha 2021 University of Southern Maine

Impact Of Group Prenatal Care On Health Outcomes For Women Of Color In The United States: A Systematic Literature Review, Morgan Brockington, Emily Bauer, Julie Kameisha

Thinking Matters Symposium

Women of color in the United States experience disproportionately higher rates of adverse pregnancy-related outcomes, both in the prenatal and postpartum period. Group prenatal care (GPC) has been gaining popularity in recent years and has demonstrated improved health outcomes. The aim of this systematic literature review was to examine and summarize the impact of group prenatal care on health outcomes for women of color in the United States. Using a systematic approach and PRISMA guidelines, two electronic databases—CINAHL and PubMed—were used to search the literature. Quantitative research studies that were published in peer-reviewed journals between 2010 and 2020 ...


Innovations In U.S. Health Care Delivery To Reduce Disparities In Maternal Mortality Among African American And American Indian/Alaskan Native Women, Swapna Reddy, Nina Patel, Mary Saxon, Nina Amin, Rizwana Biviji 2021 Arizona State University

Innovations In U.S. Health Care Delivery To Reduce Disparities In Maternal Mortality Among African American And American Indian/Alaskan Native Women, Swapna Reddy, Nina Patel, Mary Saxon, Nina Amin, Rizwana Biviji

Journal of Patient-Centered Research and Reviews

Despite spending more on health care than any other country, the United States has the worst maternal mortality rate among all developed nations. African American and American Indian/Alaskan Native women have the worst outcomes by race, representing a stark health disparity within the country. Contributing factors disproportionately experienced by these minority populations include challenges of access to consistent and high-quality prenatal care, prevalence of underlying conditions, toxic stress due to systemic racism, and unconscious bias in health care. While many of these factors lie upstream in the lives of women, and seemingly beyond the scope of the clinical walls ...


Assessment Of Postpartum Nurses' Knowledge And Teaching Habits Of Maternal Morbidity And Mortality, Mikayla Dodson 2021 Belmont University

Assessment Of Postpartum Nurses' Knowledge And Teaching Habits Of Maternal Morbidity And Mortality, Mikayla Dodson

DNP Scholarly Projects

The postpartum period is a joyous time of mother-infant bonding, but it can also be a risky time for women. Despite the education that is provided to postpartum women after birth, many women are still questioning whether or not the signs and symptoms they are experiencing are sufficiently alarming to alert a health care provider. Any delay in seeking care can contribute to poor health outcomes and even maternal mortality. Registered nurses oftentimes provide the bulk of discharge education to postpartum patients. When their knowledge or confidence levels regarding specific topics are low, this can negatively impact the education they ...


Barriers To Healthy Births At Nigerian Hospitals, Caroline Johnston 2021 University of South Carolina - Columbia

Barriers To Healthy Births At Nigerian Hospitals, Caroline Johnston

Senior Theses

Maternal mortality is a problem everywhere, but it is especially dangerous in Nigeria where the average woman experiences pregnancy six times during her lifetime (Population Reference Bureau, 2001). Many researchers focus on the medical complications associated with labor, such as hemorrhage, eclampsia, or infection. Although these birth complications are the direct sources of maternal death, it is also important to recognize how maternal mortality is a multifaceted issue influenced by local cultural groups, religions, politics, poverty level and the absence of basic infrastructures. Although maternal mortality is interconnected with social and geographical elements, my paper concentrates on Nigerian hospitals and ...


Mental Health Of Children And Adolescents Amidst Covid-19 And Past Pandemics: A Rapid Systematic Review, Salima Meherali, Neelam Punjani, Samantha Louie-Poon, Komal Abdul Rahim, Jai K. Das, Rehana A. Salam, Zohra S. Lassi 2021 University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada

Mental Health Of Children And Adolescents Amidst Covid-19 And Past Pandemics: A Rapid Systematic Review, Salima Meherali, Neelam Punjani, Samantha Louie-Poon, Komal Abdul Rahim, Jai K. Das, Rehana A. Salam, Zohra S. Lassi

School of Nursing & Midwifery

Background: The COVID‑19 pandemic and associated public health measures have disrupted the lives of people around the world. It is already evident that the direct and indirect psychological and social effects of the COVID‑19 pandemic are insidious and affect the mental health of young children and adolescents now and will in the future. The aim and objectives of this knowledge-synthesis study were to identify the impact of the pandemic on children's and adolescent's mental health and to evaluate the effectiveness of different interventions employed during previous and the current pandemic to promote children's and adolescents ...


Evidence-Based Practice: Delaying Infant Bathing, Gabrielle Wadle, Grace Frankland 2021 Murray State University

Evidence-Based Practice: Delaying Infant Bathing, Gabrielle Wadle, Grace Frankland

Scholars Week

A hospital's policy regarding infant bathing is currently not congruent with best nursing practice. The hospital’s current policy is to bathe an infant once they are stable and their rectal temperature is at or above 98.6 °F. Although the infant may become stable within the first 24-hours of birth, the World Health Organization recommends that, “Bathing should be delayed until 24 hours after birth.” (2013, p. 4). Research has been completed to support delaying infant bathing until 24 hours post-delivery, suggesting potential modifications to current policy.


Gynaecological Morbidities Among Married Women And Husband's Behaviour: Evidence From A Community-Based Study, Tazeen Saeed Ali, Neelofar Sami, Adil Ali Saeed, Parveen Ali 2021 Aga Khan University

Gynaecological Morbidities Among Married Women And Husband's Behaviour: Evidence From A Community-Based Study, Tazeen Saeed Ali, Neelofar Sami, Adil Ali Saeed, Parveen Ali

School of Nursing & Midwifery

Aim: To determine the association between gynaecological morbidities and IPV among married women specifically, with attention to the attitudes of the husband and the degree of satisfaction in a marital relationship.
Design: Cross-sectional study design.
Methods: Data were collected using face-to-face interviews with married women aged 15-49 years, living in selected communities. Information was collected on demographic characteristics, gynaecological morbidities and IPV using a self-developed tool. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the data.
Results: Logistic Regression showed a significant association between physical violence and burning micturition, increased urinary frequency, constant dribbling of urine, genital ulcers, lower abdominal ...


Connected Care: The Relationship Between Infant-Caregiver Interaction & Preterm Infant Development, Amelia G. Williams 2021 Portland State University

Connected Care: The Relationship Between Infant-Caregiver Interaction & Preterm Infant Development, Amelia G. Williams

University Honors Theses

This thesis encompasses how families and healthcare workers alike can uplift preterm infants’ development in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The use of positive facial expressions, skin-to-skin contact, verbalizing with the infant, quality time, and focused attention are explored to promote the preterm infant’s positive development. Additionally, this thesis includes research on optimizing the transition from hospital to home for both parents and infants.

This thesis aims to gather information that caregivers can easily reference and put into action with preterm infants. At the end of each body paragraph, the reader can promptly locate summarizing bullet points of how ...


Intimate Partner Violence Against Women: A Comprehensive Depiction Of Pakistani Literature, Tazeen Saeed Ali, Rozina Karmaliani, Rida Farhan, Syeda Hussain, Fatima Jawad 2021 Aga Khan University

Intimate Partner Violence Against Women: A Comprehensive Depiction Of Pakistani Literature, Tazeen Saeed Ali, Rozina Karmaliani, Rida Farhan, Syeda Hussain, Fatima Jawad

School of Nursing & Midwifery

Background: Intimate partner violence against women is a significant problem in Pakistan associated with an alarming set of mental health issues.
Aims: To identify the prevalence of intimate partner violence in Pakistan and the causes, health effects and coping strategies used by women.
Methods: A comprehensive search based on the identified keywords was conducted using Google Scholar and PubMed. Relevant literature was also searched and included. Abstracts were then shortlisted using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guidelines, and 25 studies were selected. Quantitative studies on intimate partner violence were included in the review. The review comprises ...


Smoking Cessation Interventions In South Asian Countries: Protocol For Scoping Review, Sajid Iqbal, Rubina Barolia, Laila Ladak, Pammla Petrucka 2021 Aga Khan University

Smoking Cessation Interventions In South Asian Countries: Protocol For Scoping Review, Sajid Iqbal, Rubina Barolia, Laila Ladak, Pammla Petrucka

School of Nursing & Midwifery

Introduction: Unfortunately, like many other health risks, smoking rate has been on the rise in developing countries. Half of current smokers in the world reside in only three countries of Asia that include India. Many smoking cessation interventions that were developed and successfully implemented in the context of developed countries have not been equally successful in South Asia. Hence, there is a dire need of culturally relevant smoking cessation interventions. We propose a scoping review with objectives to explore the extent and nature of interventions for smoking cessation and its associated factors in South Asian Region by systematically reviewing the ...


Health In Environment: Reduce Surgical Site Infections By Applying Florence Nightingale's Environmental Theory, Anna Rana 2021 Aga Khan University

Health In Environment: Reduce Surgical Site Infections By Applying Florence Nightingale's Environmental Theory, Anna Rana

School of Nursing & Midwifery

Surgical site infection is one of the most common causes of readmission in hospitals and it also leads to an overall increased burden. This can be decreased by applying basic concepts of Nightingale (1860) "Environmental Theory" while giving care to the patients. Keeping in view Nightingale's environmental theory, this paper aims to discuss the case of a patient suffering from a surgical site infection. It will help readers to understand the environmental factors which affect the patients' health and provide a way to promote healing and fast recovery by modifying their environment.


Peer Victimization And Experiences Of Violence At School And At Home Among School Age Children With Disabilities In Pakistan And Afghanistan, Rozina Somani, Julienne Corboz, Rozina Karmaliani, Esnat D. Chirwa, Judith McFarlane, Hussain Maqbool Ahmed Khuwaja, Nargis Asad, Yasmeen Hassan Somani, Ingrid Van Der Heijden, Rachel Jewke 2021 University of Toronto , Toronto, Canada

Peer Victimization And Experiences Of Violence At School And At Home Among School Age Children With Disabilities In Pakistan And Afghanistan, Rozina Somani, Julienne Corboz, Rozina Karmaliani, Esnat D. Chirwa, Judith Mcfarlane, Hussain Maqbool Ahmed Khuwaja, Nargis Asad, Yasmeen Hassan Somani, Ingrid Van Der Heijden, Rachel Jewke

School of Nursing & Midwifery

Background: Children with disabilities are more likely to experience violence or injury at school and at home, but there is little evidence from Central Asia.
Objective: To describe the prevalence of disability and associations with peer violence perpetration and victimization, depression, corporal punishment, school performance and school attendance, among middle school children in Pakistan and Afghanistan.
Method: This is a secondary analysis of data gathered in the course of evaluations of interventions to prevent peer violence conducted in Pakistan and Afghanistan as part of the 'What Works to Prevent Violence against Women and Girls Global Programme'. In Pakistan, the research ...


Counting Stillbirths And Covid 19-There Has Never Been A More Urgent Time, Caroline S E. Homer, Susannah Hopkins Leisher, Neelam Aggarwa, Joseph Akuze, Delly Babona, Hannah Blencowe, John Bolgna, Richard Chawana, Aliki Christou, Rafat Jan 2021 Burnet Institute, Melbourne, Australia

Counting Stillbirths And Covid 19-There Has Never Been A More Urgent Time, Caroline S E. Homer, Susannah Hopkins Leisher, Neelam Aggarwa, Joseph Akuze, Delly Babona, Hannah Blencowe, John Bolgna, Richard Chawana, Aliki Christou, Rafat Jan

School of Nursing & Midwifery

No abstract provided.


Digitalisation Provisions For Controlling Depression In Developing Countries: Short Review, Naureen Akber Ali, Hasan Nawaz Tahir, Rawshan Jabeen 2021 Aga Khan University

Digitalisation Provisions For Controlling Depression In Developing Countries: Short Review, Naureen Akber Ali, Hasan Nawaz Tahir, Rawshan Jabeen

School of Nursing & Midwifery

Depression is a global health issue which is associated with disability, absenteeism, decreased productivity and high suicide rates. It is the fourth most common cause of disability globally and by the year 2020 it will be the second leading cause of disease burden. In Pakistan, the prevalence of depression is 45.9%. A unique and promising method for addressing the issue is mobile health (m-health). It refers to the utilisation of mobile technology to support various aspects of healthcare. Electronic record, SMS, internet, wearable devices and mobile applications are some of the digitalisation approaches used to bridge the treatment gap ...


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