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Cattlemen's Day

1982

Articles 1 - 29 of 29

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Alfalfa Silages And Hay And Corn Supplementation For Yearling Steers, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg, M. Hinds, J. Hoover Jan 1982

Alfalfa Silages And Hay And Corn Supplementation For Yearling Steers, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg, M. Hinds, J. Hoover

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Four alfalfa forages were evaluated: 1) hay; 2) low-dry matter (DM) silage; 3) medium-DM silage; and 4) high-DM silage. All forages were full-fed along with 2 lb of supplement or supplement plus 2 or 4 lb of cracked corn. Calves fed hay or medium-DM silage had the fastest and most efficient gains. Hay had the highest intake; low-DM silage, the lowest. Adding corn to the ration improved calf performance slightly, but feed costs per lb of gain were similar for all three levels of corn supplementation. Low- and medium-DM silages were better preserved than high-DM silage, which contained considerable spoilage ...


Stocking Rate And Supplementation For Steers Grazing Intensively On Early-Stocked Bluestem Pasture, R. Held, E.F. Smith, Jack G. Riley, Clenton E. Owensby Jan 1982

Stocking Rate And Supplementation For Steers Grazing Intensively On Early-Stocked Bluestem Pasture, R. Held, E.F. Smith, Jack G. Riley, Clenton E. Owensby

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Native bluestem pastures were grazed by 520-lb steers from April 30 to July 14 at stocking rates of 1.7, 1.3 and 1.1 acres per steer. Daily gain of the steers was about the same for the two heavier stocking rates, but was slightly lower for the lightest rate (1.7 acres/steer). The gain per acre increased with each increase in stocking rate. Half of the steers were self-fed a salt-limited sorghum grain-rumensin mixture. Each steer consuming approximately 1.5 pounds per day of this mixture gained about a half a pound more per day (P<.05) than did each steer not fed the supplement (1.77 vs 1.27 lbs.). Gain per acre was increased by 33 lbs. with the supplementation.


Effect Of Bovatec And Ralgro Implants On Finishing Steer Performance, Lyle W. Lomas Jan 1982

Effect Of Bovatec And Ralgro Implants On Finishing Steer Performance, Lyle W. Lomas

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Cattle fed Bovatec consumed 17.4% less feed and were 17.7% more efficient than controls, with no effect on gain. Ralgro implants improved gain 12% and feed efficiency 6.9%, with no effect on feed intake. Bovatec and Ralgro combined had an additive effect on feed efficiency.


Effect Of Lasalocid On Performance Of Grazing Steers, L.R. Corah, Jack G. Riley, Ronald V. Pope Jan 1982

Effect Of Lasalocid On Performance Of Grazing Steers, L.R. Corah, Jack G. Riley, Ronald V. Pope

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Steers fed 200 mg of Lasalocid per day while grazing bromegrass pasture gained 7.6% faster than non-medicated controls; however, this difference was not statistically significant.


Forage Sorghum Silage And Summer Annual Silage And Hays For Growing Steers And Heifers, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg, M. Nuwanyakpa, Gerry L. Posler Jan 1982

Forage Sorghum Silage And Summer Annual Silage And Hays For Growing Steers And Heifers, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg, M. Nuwanyakpa, Gerry L. Posler

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Sorghum-Sudan hay and silage and sudangrass hay were compared with forage sorghum silage in an 80-day growing trial involving 60 calves. Calves fed forage sorghum gained 14% faster than those fed sudangrass hay (P<.05). Calves fed either of the two silages consumed less feed (P<.05) but were more efficient (P<.05) than those fed either of the two hays. This and two previous trials indicate that early-harvested summer annual silages and hays produce similar rates of gain but that silages are used 10 to 20% more efficiently by growing cattle. These forages have 75 to 90% of the relative feeding value of average-quality forage sorghum silage. With crude protein content of 12 to 15%, our summer annuals required little, if any, supplemental protein.


Estrus Synchronization Of Cattle In Kansas, D.D. Simms, L.R. Sprott, Kenneth G. Odde, L.R. Corah Jan 1982

Estrus Synchronization Of Cattle In Kansas, D.D. Simms, L.R. Sprott, Kenneth G. Odde, L.R. Corah

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

In 22 field trials involving 1,692 cattle, we evaluated Lutalyse as an estrus-synchronization agent for both natural mating and artificial insemination. Only 52.7% of the females in all 22 trials were cycling at the start of the breeding season. Both body condition and days postpartum at the start of the breeding season influenced the response to Lutalyse. First-service pregnancy rate in the 2 or 3 days of synchronization was 38.4% for all 453 females bred artificially in 12 trials in northwestern Kansas. The rate was 59%, however, if only females observed to be in heat were counted ...


Kansas Survey: What Do Commercial Cow-Calf Producers Consider When Buying Herd Sires?, R. Bolze, C. Lambert, S. O'Neill, L. Corah Jan 1982

Kansas Survey: What Do Commercial Cow-Calf Producers Consider When Buying Herd Sires?, R. Bolze, C. Lambert, S. O'Neill, L. Corah

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Recently, Kansas State University surveyed the factors a commercial cowman considers when he buys Angus, Simmental, or Hereford bulls. A mail survey of the customers of 29 purebred breeders of those three breeds was conducted. We attempted to include a reasonable cross section of both performance and show-ring-oriented breeders. A total of 1,447 survey forms were distributed and 613 (42%) were returned.


Little Things That Mean A Lot In Managing Beef Cattle, D. Pretzer Jan 1982

Little Things That Mean A Lot In Managing Beef Cattle, D. Pretzer

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Survival in the beef cattle business for the next year or so will depend on doing little things well, says Don Pretzer, extension farm management specialist at Kansas State. "Doing enough little things right will add up to big differences in profitability. no matter whether you're a cow-calf operator, a backgrounder or a cattle finisher." He offers some interesting ideas for cattle ranchers. The economist says cow herd costs are running around $375 per cow-calf unit per year. This includes $178 for feed, including pasture for 15% replacements. 15% interest on the value of the cow ($450) and $32 ...


Insecticide-Impregnated Ear Tags For Range Cattle, G.L. Lynch, K.O. Zoellner, A.B. Broce, Jack G. Riley Jan 1982

Insecticide-Impregnated Ear Tags For Range Cattle, G.L. Lynch, K.O. Zoellner, A.B. Broce, Jack G. Riley

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

When both cows and calves were double-tagged (one tag per ear) with ear tags impregnated with fenvalerate (Ectrin) or permethrin (Atroban), the calves gained faster (P<.01) than when neither cows nor calves were tagged. Double-tagged yearling heifers gained faster (P<.05) than did heifers without tags. When all cows had been double-tagged, tagging the calves did not increase calf weight gain.


Silo-Best And Sila-Ferm Additives For Corn Silage And Drought-Stressed Corn Silage For Yearling Steers, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg Jan 1982

Silo-Best And Sila-Ferm Additives For Corn Silage And Drought-Stressed Corn Silage For Yearling Steers, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Normal corn silage, with and without additives, and drought-stressed corn silage were evaluated in a 77-day growing trial using 64 steers. Steers fed drought silage had slowest and least efficient gains. Additive-treated silages were used more efficiently than the control silage. Dry matter recovery from the silos was consistently improved by the enzyme additive but not by the microbial inoculant additive. Steer gain per ton of corn crop ensiled was increased by 7.2 and 4.4 lb for enzyme and inoculant silages, respectively, compared with that for the control silage.


Effects Of Rumensin Or Rumensin-Tylan Combination On Steer Performance And Liver Abscess Control, Jack G. Riley, Ronald V. Pope Jan 1982

Effects Of Rumensin Or Rumensin-Tylan Combination On Steer Performance And Liver Abscess Control, Jack G. Riley, Ronald V. Pope

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Combining Tylan with Rumensin dramatically reduced abscessed liver incidence, compared with that of steers fed a non-medicated control ration or Rumensin without Tylan. Only one steer out of 50 on the Rumensin plus Tylan combination had an abscessed liver, whereas livers from 16 of the control steers and 27 on Rumensin were condemned. There were no significant differences in daily gain among treatments; however, Rumensin plus Tylan improved feed efficiency by 9.4% compared with that of the control. Rumensin alone improved efficiency by 6%.


Natural Mating Of Estrus-Synchronized Heifers And Indicators Of Bull Fertility, R.J. Pruitt, L.R. Corah, D.D. Simms, M.F. Spire Jan 1982

Natural Mating Of Estrus-Synchronized Heifers And Indicators Of Bull Fertility, R.J. Pruitt, L.R. Corah, D.D. Simms, M.F. Spire

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

In six trials involving 486 heifers and 23 bulls, we studied factors affecting pregnancy rates of estrus-synchronized heifers mated naturally and evaluated indicators of bull fertility. Heavier heifers and those in fleshier condition had a higher response to estrus synchronization with Lutalyse. Heifers serviced more than once did not have higher pregnancy rates. Pregnancy rates achieved by bulls ejaculating up to 32 times in 2 1/2 days decreased only slightly as the number of ejaculations increased. There was considerable variation in pregnancy rates and the number of ejaculations achieved by individual bulls. Sex drive measured by a 3D-minute serving-capacity ...


High-Moisture Corn With Additives For Finishing Rations, B. Young, H. Ilg, K. Bolsen Jan 1982

High-Moisture Corn With Additives For Finishing Rations, B. Young, H. Ilg, K. Bolsen

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Dry corn (dry), Harvestore ensiled high-moisture corn, stave silo ensiled high-moisture corn (stave H.M.C.) and stave H.M.C. ensiled with NaOH, Cold-flo ammonia, or Silo-Best additives were evaluated in steer and heifer finishing trials. Cold-flo and NaOH H.M.C. gave slowest gains; NaOH had the highest intake and Harvestore H.M.C. the lowest, efficiency of gain favored the Harvestore H.M.C. All H.M.C. corn except NaOH was unstable in air because of high dry matter at ensiling, slow corn use, and warm temperatures. Dry matter losses and temperature rises during air exposure ...


Fed Cattle Market Is Guardedly Optimistic, Says K-State's Sands, M. Sands Jan 1982

Fed Cattle Market Is Guardedly Optimistic, Says K-State's Sands, M. Sands

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Returns to cattle feeders should move back into the profit column during most of 1982. but feeding margins will remain narrow, says Mike Sands, extension economist specializing in livestock marketing at K-State. "Most of the improvement in profitability compared with last year will result from lower feed and feeder prices, rather than a dramatic rise in fed cattle prices." he points out. With Choice steer prices expected to average in the $64-66 cwt. range during January-June. feeding returns should average on the positive side, in sharp contrast to the average $95-per-head losses suffered during the first half of 1981. Sands ...


Trials On Commercial Silage Additives, K. Bolsen Jan 1982

Trials On Commercial Silage Additives, K. Bolsen

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Numerous commercial silage additives, manufacturers of which make various claims for their improving silage quality, are available to Kansas farmers and ranchers. In 2 previous years (1980 and 1981), we reported on nine trials involving six additives (Progress Reports 377 and 394). Each additive improved the silage in at least one of the four criteria we evaluated: 1) ensiling temperature, 2) dry matter recovery, 3) feeding value, and 4) aerobic stability. Two more trials with additives are reported on in this Progress Report (pages 6 and 11 ).


The Effect Of Avoparcin On The Performance Of Grazing Steers, L.R. Corah, W.D. Busby, Jack G. Riley Jan 1982

The Effect Of Avoparcin On The Performance Of Grazing Steers, L.R. Corah, W.D. Busby, Jack G. Riley

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

One hundred two steers were used to study the effect of Avoparcin on the performance of grazing steers. Four desired dosages -- 0. 200, 400. and 600 mg/head/day -- were compared in a self-fed mineral mix. Feeding Avoparcin at the desired level of 400 mg/head/day increased steer gains By 22%.


Effect Of Rumensin On Legume Bloat In Cattle, M.P. Katz, E.E. Bartley, E.S. Pressman, Tiruvoor G. Nagaraja Jan 1982

Effect Of Rumensin On Legume Bloat In Cattle, M.P. Katz, E.E. Bartley, E.S. Pressman, Tiruvoor G. Nagaraja

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Rumensin with or without Bloatguard was fed to rumen-fistulated cattle grazing lush alfalfa pasture. Although Rumensin alone or in combination with low doses of Bloatguard reduced bloat, it was not completely effective. Hence, Bloatguard at the recommended dose is still necessary for full bloat control.


Effect Of Bovatec On Grazing Steer Performance, Lyle W. Lomas Jan 1982

Effect Of Bovatec On Grazing Steer Performance, Lyle W. Lomas

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Steers fed 100 mg or 200 mg of Bovatec per head daily while grazing bromegrass gained 16.4% and 23.9% faster, respectively, during 112 days of grazing than did controls.


Naoh Wheat Silage And Alfalfa Haylage For Growing Steers And Heifers, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg, M. Nuwanyakpa, J. Hoover Jan 1982

Naoh Wheat Silage And Alfalfa Haylage For Growing Steers And Heifers, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg, M. Nuwanyakpa, J. Hoover

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Wheat silage, with and without sodium hydroxide (NaOH), was fed, with or without alfalfa haylage, in an 80-day growing trial. Calves fed NaOH-silage consumed 18% more feed and gained 16% faster than those fed control silage, but feed efficiencies were similar. When 50% of the wheat silage was replaced with alfalfa haylage (DM basis), gains decreased 3.1 and 3.7%, feed intake increased 12.3 and 9.7%, and feed efficiency decreased 23.7 and 14.4% for calves fed control and NaOH silages, respectively. NaOH increased ensiling temperatures by 9 to 12° C during the first 6 weeks ...


Sila-Bac And Molasses Additives For High Moisture Sorghum Grain, J.I. Heidker, H. Ilg, Keith C. Behnke, K. Bolsen Jan 1982

Sila-Bac And Molasses Additives For High Moisture Sorghum Grain, J.I. Heidker, H. Ilg, Keith C. Behnke, K. Bolsen

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Sila-bac, molasses, or both combined were evaluated as additives for ensiled high moisture sorghum grain. Control grain had the greatest increase in temperature during ensiling. Grain treated with Sila-bac had the highest lactobacilli count but control grain had the fastest drop in pH. Sila-bac grain was the most stable in air and remained stable for 30 days. Control grain was stable for 21 days; grain treated with molasses or molasses plus Sila-bac was stable until day 5. Group-fed steers receiving Sila-bac grain gained faster and were more efficient than steers fed control or molasses-treated grain. Individually fed steers gained fastest ...


Effect Of Bovatec® And Synovex-S® Implants On Finishing Steer Performance, Lyle W. Lomas Jan 1982

Effect Of Bovatec® And Synovex-S® Implants On Finishing Steer Performance, Lyle W. Lomas

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Cattle fed Bovatec consumed 18.3% less feed and were 19.4% more efficient in feed conversion than controls, with no effect on gain. Synovex-S implants improved gain by 8.2% with no effect on feed intake and feed efficiency. The effects of Bovatec and Synovex-S were additive.


Inoculant And Urea-Molasses Additives For Forage Sorghum Silage, M. Hinds, J. Brethour, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg Jan 1982

Inoculant And Urea-Molasses Additives For Forage Sorghum Silage, M. Hinds, J. Brethour, K. Bolsen, H. Ilg

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

An inoculant (Sila-bac) and a non-protein nitrogen (LSA-100) silage additive were evaluated with whole-plant, forage sorghum silage. Sila-bac silage had the fastest temperature rise and peaked at 10 C above its initial temperature. LSA-100 silage had a slow, steady temperature rise and reached a maximum of 22 C above its initial. Control silage peaked at 15 C above its initial. Steers fed LSA-100 silage gained 7 to 9% faster than did those fed control or Sila-bac silages. LSA-100 silage was consumed in greatest amount; Sila-bac silage, in the least. The two additives improved feed efficiency by 3% over the control ...


Whole Sorghum Grain Stillage For Beef Cattle, S. Soderlund, K. Bolsen, B. Brent, Ronald V. Pope, Jack G. Riley Jan 1982

Whole Sorghum Grain Stillage For Beef Cattle, S. Soderlund, K. Bolsen, B. Brent, Ronald V. Pope, Jack G. Riley

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Trials were conducted to evaluate the storing, handling, and feeding of whole sorghum grain stillage from a farm-scale still. Stillage varied in dry matter among batches and had to be agitated to keep solids suspended. Whole stillage kept for 10 days to 2 weeks, even during warm weather, with mold growth occurring only on the surface. However, when stillage was mixed with either grain or forage, it spoiled rapidly and required close bunk management. Although whole stillage was still palatable to cattle after 2 weeks, intakes were best when it was less than 3 days old. When whole stillage was ...


Ruminal Effects Of Rumensin During Cold Stress, J.B. Robinson, D.R. Ames, David A. Nichols Jan 1982

Ruminal Effects Of Rumensin During Cold Stress, J.B. Robinson, D.R. Ames, David A. Nichols

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Two trials were conducted to determine the effects of Rumensin in cold-stressed cattle. Steers fed diets with and without Rumensin were exposed to cold stress (0 C) and thermoneutrality (20 C). Rumen volatile fatty acids and rumen vault gases were sampled to monitor rumen fermentation. Although not statistically significant, Rumensin decreased rumen acetate to propionate ratios and increased CO2/CH4 ratios in both thermal environments. Such a methane decease should improve feed efficiency because less energy is wasted. Thus, Rumensin appears to support a more efficient rumen fermentation in cold stress as well as thermoneutrality.


Using Sprinklers To Improve Performance Of Heat-Stressed Feedlot Cattle, D.R. Ames, J.B. Robinson, David A. Nichols Jan 1982

Using Sprinklers To Improve Performance Of Heat-Stressed Feedlot Cattle, D.R. Ames, J.B. Robinson, David A. Nichols

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

During a 56-day test, four pens of finishing cattle were sprinkled when dry-bulb temperatures exceeded 80 F. The performance of the cattle was compared with that of cattle in pens not sprinkled. Cattle in sprinkled pens gained faster (2.83 vs 2.44 lbs per day, P<.05) and more efficiently (4.45 vs 5.20 lbs feed per lb gain) than did those in the nonsprinkled. Feed intakes of all cattle were similar.


Effect Of Ralgro And Compudose On Grazing Steer Performance, Lyle W. Lomas Jan 1982

Effect Of Ralgro And Compudose On Grazing Steer Performance, Lyle W. Lomas

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

COMPUDOSE (an estradiol removable implant) increased steer gains during 202 days of grazing by 11.4%. Ralgro implants (once at the beginning of the study) increased gain 8.5%. Steer performance on the two implants was statistically similar.


Feeding Rumensin To Yearling Heifers On Late-Summer Grass, M. Jensen, R. Held, E.F. Smith, Jack G. Riley Jan 1982

Feeding Rumensin To Yearling Heifers On Late-Summer Grass, M. Jensen, R. Held, E.F. Smith, Jack G. Riley

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Rumensin was self-fed in a loose salt mixture to yearling heifers on late-summer bluestem pasture (August to November). They ate 0.036 lbs. of salt mixture (124 mg of Rumensin) daily, but performance did not improve.


Reproduction And Production Of Heifers Implanted With Ralgro Before Weaning, D.D. Simms, F.L. Schwartz, L.R. Corah Jan 1982

Reproduction And Production Of Heifers Implanted With Ralgro Before Weaning, D.D. Simms, F.L. Schwartz, L.R. Corah

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Over a 3-year period (1976-1978), heifer calves either were not implanted or were implanted between 2 and 5 months of age. In 1977, the study also included heifers implanted at birth. Implanting at birth increased the percentage of heifers open as yearlings. More implanted heifers tended to be open as 2- to 5-year-olds than control heifers, but the differences were not statistically significant. Implanting of the heifers had no effect on weight gains of their calves.


Effect Of 48-Hour Calf Removal, D.D. Simms, Kenneth G. Odde, L.R. Corah Jan 1982

Effect Of 48-Hour Calf Removal, D.D. Simms, Kenneth G. Odde, L.R. Corah

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

In three field trials, we removed calves from 187 beef cows for 48 hours at the beginning of the breeding season to determine the effect on the cows' cycling activity, conception rate, and pregnancy rate. When calves were removed, the cows were injected with Lutalyse. Removing calves for 48 hours did not change weight gain or sickness incidence of calves, but neither did it facilitate the cows' rebreeding.